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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 03-12-2015 12:23 PM 583 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


03-12-2015 12:23 PM

I’m sure its been addressed here but there’s not a whole lot of people out there talking about warping wood. The only one I’ve seen is Charles Neil.

So guys—here’s the deal. I live in NE FL. Humidity is the enemy, both for our woodworking and our machinery.

What I’ve been doing lately is after I mill wood I keep it sealed in plastic, either wrapping it with plastic wrap or bagging it, until I need it next or at least every night during a project. This seems to have greatly reduced the problems for me.

Yesterday was a perfect example. I have several pieces of hickory milled and stickered. Inplastic for a few days, then on the bench. Checking it each day, perfectly flat and no major cupping.

In comes a late afternoon storm. Got distracted and forgot to wrap. Up early this AM, foggy and 100% humidity.
One of the stiles for a door had a 1/8” warp lengthwise. Another about 1/16 and the wide board was almost 1/8.

I re-jointed one stile and hand planed a little off the opposite side, but now I have a 11/16” board instead of 3/4 (and I think it will get worse.) I’ve re-wrapped in plastic and will leave till tomorrow.

Short of a climate controlled shop (not an option for me) I don’t know what else to do.

What do you guys do after milling lumber?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


4 replies so far

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1035 days


#1 posted 03-12-2015 12:55 PM

If you wrap your boards or projects,check U-line they have some big bags and other items you can use to wrap projects and there prices are pretty good.I use then when I need something that isn’t run of the mill in my local store.This is just a tip I have nothing to do with them.

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Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#2 posted 03-12-2015 01:58 PM


Yesterday was a perfect example. I have several pieces of hickory milled and stickered. Inplastic for a few days, then on the bench. Checking it each day, perfectly flat and no major cupping.

In comes a late afternoon storm. Got distracted and forgot to wrap. Up early this AM, foggy and 100% humidity.
One of the stiles for a door had a 1/8” warp lengthwise. Another about 1/16 and the wide board was almost 1/8.

I re-jointed one stile and hand planed a little off the opposite side, but now I have a 11/16” board instead of 3/4 (and I think it will get worse.) I ve re-wrapped in plastic and will leave till tomorrow.

- rwe2156

rwe, I believe, if the board warped as a result of changing weather, once the weather returns to the condition of when you milled it, the board will return to it’s milled shape. I don’t know that for sure but that’s the theory I understand from some reading on the subject.

The idea is, then, of course, that the board should be stabilized by the project design when it’s in it’s flat state, otherwise it will always warp in changing weather conditions, even when the finished item is in use.

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#3 posted 03-12-2015 09:47 PM

My experience is once it’s cupped its cupped.
To my knowledge cupping and warping occur due to 2 things: internal stress relieved by cutting, and moisture differentials between 2 surfaces.

My theory is minor stress is accentuated by unequal moisture content when you open up a board by ripping or especially, re sawing.

I have wet surfaces and used lamps in thin stock but never had luck (or patience?) with thicker.

The wood I’m using is from a reputable lumber supplier and is supposed to be kiln dried.
It’s all rift sawn wood hate to make stiles out of that but couldn’t find any wide boards to get some 1/4 sawn.

What I’m confused about is why it went so quick seemed like the wood would be stabilized after sitting almost 2 weeks.

I’ll get her done…... Doors will just end up a little thinner.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#4 posted 03-12-2015 10:04 PM



What I m confused about is why it went so quick seemed like the wood would be stabilized after sitting almost 2 weeks.

- rwe2156

I think you answered it when you said it was when the weather changed that the boards changed.

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