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How would you gang cut these pickets?

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Forum topic by John posted 06-08-2009 03:05 PM 2452 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John

341 posts in 2521 days


06-08-2009 03:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: fence picket cut bandsaw circular saw help advice williamsburg

need to cut about 200 pickets… each has a double point at the top (like these: http://www.history.org/publications/books/images/wmsbgglgardens.jpg) – how would you do the valley cut in the center? would you do 5-6 at a time on the bandsaw, line them all up end to end and use a circular saw?

the pickets are 40×6 x 3/4 inches, they will have a double point at the top, like an upside down “W”

appreciate any thoughts!

thanks:
JC

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com


43 replies so far

View Rustic's profile

Rustic

3152 posts in 2319 days


#1 posted 06-08-2009 03:19 PM

you could cut them on a bandsaw. Your best bet is to do what you feel comfortable.

-- www.carvingandturningsbyrick.com, Rick Kruse, Grand Rapids, MI

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ellen35

2589 posts in 2156 days


#2 posted 06-08-2009 03:27 PM

I would cut a single point on a miter saw, then cut the v groove with either a band saw or saber saw with a jig…you make the jig.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

5933 posts in 2152 days


#3 posted 06-08-2009 04:45 PM

I’d probably cut single pickets from 1X3s and hold two together with the horizontal rails. That appears to be how they were done in the link/picture you provided.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 2091 days


#4 posted 06-08-2009 04:54 PM

I’m with Gene, 1×3’s and do your points on the miter saw.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2521 days


#5 posted 06-08-2009 04:55 PM

Thanks for your replies so far – I keep picturing lining them all up and cutting the valley along the top with a circular saw, then I can get large batches at one, and I can follow up with the miter saw to quickly clip the corners.

Ellen I like the sabersaw/jig idea, might be a good excuse to finally get a good saber :-)

Gene they are single boards, the one on the right in the pic is slightly split which makes it look like two. I want single boards. There are several fences just like this in Colonial Williamsburg, and while they may not be the most practical, I want an authentic look (i.e. it’s what the wife wants!)

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2249 days


#6 posted 06-08-2009 05:04 PM

I’d just use a jigsaw and be done with it. A decent jigsaw like a bosch or dewalt with a good blade will cut those very easily.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

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patron

13146 posts in 2064 days


#7 posted 06-08-2009 05:20 PM

yes to the above ,
or you could make a jig for the router and use a spiral cutter and bushing to follow it,
any way you decide , it is patience and repetition .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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lew

10129 posts in 2479 days


#8 posted 06-08-2009 05:21 PM

Definitely the jig saw.

Why?- every project requires a new tool purchase. This is Woodworkers Unwritten Rule #2!

It would probably be the fastest method, also

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View John's profile

John

341 posts in 2521 days


#9 posted 06-08-2009 06:37 PM

Thanks again – keep ‘em coming!

I’m putting my money where my mouth is on this question – offering a ONE DOLLAR reward on tweetbrain! https://tweetbrain.com/answers/to/218340—so post your answers there too please!

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2451 days


#10 posted 06-08-2009 06:42 PM

why not tilt your tablesaw blade to 45 degrees and clamp a few of these boards (however many you can comforatbly support) and slide them accross the blad with a mitreing jig. Flip and repeat. Then you’ve got a whole bunch done quickly and in an easy to repeat fashion? not sure if you have a crosscut sled or tablesaw capable of handling the length of the stock though.

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2451 days


#11 posted 06-08-2009 06:43 PM

oops, bently beat me to it

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2057 days


#12 posted 06-08-2009 08:20 PM

I like a tablesaw solution best providing you can stand them vertical. I would clamp a bunch together. Two of the angles are the same from each edge. You can register the first edge against a spacer when you do the first cut, then remove the spacer and run it through again registering the same edge to cut the 2nd angled in the same direction. Then register the other edge again with the spacer inserted and do the same procedure again. Of course the blade will be set at 45 degrees.

Hope this is a little clearer than mud. Don’t hesitate to ask for clarification if your interested in this method. This is the same solution as bently but with the addition of the spacer.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2589 posts in 2156 days


#13 posted 06-08-2009 08:25 PM

Can you really stand a 40” picket vertically on a table saw…and do it safely??
I’m curious!
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2451 days


#14 posted 06-08-2009 08:31 PM

i assume when people say vertically, they mean:
not on its face, but up on its edge

I could be wrong, but thats what I was trying to suggest.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2057 days


#15 posted 06-08-2009 08:31 PM

Don’t see why not Ellen. A bunch clamped together should be plenty stable. The pickets would have their top edge on the table with the width of the picket 90 degrees to the fence. I would make some trial cuts first to ensure accuracy, but once set up it should go great. you might want a scrap piece on the back to prevent tear out on the last piece.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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