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Forum topic by SirIrb posted 03-09-2015 06:11 PM 720 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


03-09-2015 06:11 PM

I have to post this as a way of coming to terms with my being out of action for a bit.

I had tweaked my old craftsman saw in. Had it running as well as one could expect. I had plans on getting an old Unisaw from my former boss when I go back home in July. I figured I could make it. Dads old saw had lasted since the 70’s so what is a few more months?

Then the saw started throwing the GFIC. Hummm. I plugged it in another outlet and the motor had a thumping sound which was accompanied with some light works in the motor housing (not quite fire, not quite sparks, more like flame sparks).

I calmly placed my piece of cherry on the work bench and decided I was officially screwed. So I am on the sidelines till I can get my new beast.

Sure, new motor. I may. But how much should I dump in a saw that I wont be able to make back when I sell it? And not having the good ole boy network as strong here as I did back when I lived in South Ms. I dont have any strings to pull. (So if you live in Winston-Salem and have a motor….)

Services will be held Friday (though I dont miss him much, I just needed him for a few more months).

[Some sappy Whitney Houston song playing in the back ground]

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.


15 replies so far

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chrisstef

15672 posts in 2472 days


#1 posted 03-09-2015 06:15 PM

I think you just need some of this to put back inside the motor. Should be good to go after that.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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jusfine

2405 posts in 2391 days


#2 posted 03-09-2015 06:18 PM

Rest in Peace, you lived a long life, what a Craftsman!

My condolences.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 03-09-2015 06:21 PM

What kind of C-man is it?? Does it have a universal motor or a real motor hanging off the back or tucked up under the cabinet? Might just need a cleaning and a couple of new bearings.. an under $20 fix.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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DIYaholic

19179 posts in 2140 days


#4 posted 03-09-2015 06:24 PM

My condolences on you loss.
Your old saw lived a full and honorable life!!!

The motor on my C’man 113 TS gave up the magic smoke. ;^(
Rather than buying a new motor, or saw for that matter….
I picked up a used C’man 315 TS, off of Craigslist, as an organ donor.
The transplant surgery was as easy as it was successful.
I even plan to transplant the CI table extensions….

Should I get lucky…. I will snag a free or cheap motor off CL.
Then I’ll sell the 315-Frankensaw….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#5 posted 03-09-2015 06:32 PM

I dont know the model off hand. the motor does hang out the back on a hinge. 1hp I believe. I am embarrassed to admit (and dad is rolling in his urn) but I have never rebuilt a motor.


What kind of C-man is it?? Does it have a universal motor or a real motor hanging off the back or tucked up under the cabinet? Might just need a cleaning and a couple of new bearings.. an under $20 fix.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 03-09-2015 06:41 PM

I dont know the model off hand. the motor does hang out the back on a hinge. 1hp I believe. I am embarrassed to admit (and dad is rolling in his urn) but I have never rebuilt a motor.

Dirt simple.. 4 bolts and it pops apart. Since you have already written it off, it sure wouldn’t hurt to try. You might be pleasantly surprised and wind up with a working motor that will last another couple decades for just a few bucks and some of your time. As an added bonus, you might just learn a new skill that can be used again in the future :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#7 posted 03-09-2015 06:50 PM

can I get a rebuild kit for this?

I dont know the model off hand. the motor does hang out the back on a hinge. 1hp I believe. I am embarrassed to admit (and dad is rolling in his urn) but I have never rebuilt a motor.

Dirt simple.. 4 bolts and it pops apart. Since you have already written it off, it sure wouldn t hurt to try. You might be pleasantly surprised and wind up with a working motor that will last another couple decades for just a few bucks and some of your time. As an added bonus, you might just learn a new skill that can be used again in the future :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#8 posted 03-09-2015 07:03 PM

can I get a rebuild kit for this?

Only thing you need is a couple of new bearings. The centrifugal switch and it’s contacts can be cleaned up with an emery cloth or nail file once opened up. A compressor can get the built up sawdust and other crap out of it, and a good wipe down of the stator and windings would be a good idea as well. Bearings are standard off the shelf items and can be sourced just about anywhere.. But you need to get to the bearings to know which ones you will need; don’t rely on a parts list or other document as they are not always what may be listed. Most of those motors typically use pretty standard 6202 or 6203 bearings. For reference, I just replaced the bearings in a 3HP Baldor and they cost me a whopping $17 for both including shipping from Accurate Bearing. Those are pretty big bearings, and yours should be much smaller (and cheaper).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#9 posted 03-09-2015 07:05 PM

Thanks for the 101.
Come on July. Daddy wants a big saw.

can I get a rebuild kit for this?

Only thing you need is a couple of new bearings. The centrifugal switch and it s contacts can be cleaned up with an emery cloth or nail file once opened up. A compressor can get the built up sawdust and other crap out of it, and a good wipe down of the stator and windings would be a good idea as well. Bearings are standard off the shelf items and can be sourced just about anywhere.. But you need to get to the bearings to know which ones you will need; don t rely on a parts list or other document as they are not always what may be listed. Most of those motors typically use pretty standard 6202 or 6203 bearings. For reference, I just replaced the bearings in a 3HP Baldor and they cost me a whopping $17 for both including shipping from Accurate Bearing. Those are pretty big bearings, and yours should be much smaller (and cheaper).

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#10 posted 03-09-2015 07:13 PM

Come on July. Daddy wants a big saw.

Hate to break it to you, but you will most likely want/need to replace the arbor and motor bearings on that old Unisaw as well! Again, those are really simple to do, but the practice you get doing your C-man motor would certainly help :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#11 posted 03-09-2015 07:34 PM

The former boss did me a solid without even knowing it. He had the motor rebuilt and then closed the shop. So 500 and I am down the road. But i should try to rebuild the c-man, like you said, just for some hands on.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Shadowrider's profile

Shadowrider

183 posts in 674 days


#12 posted 03-09-2015 08:16 PM

Somewhat related, but an honest question.

My dad had a C-man that he bought new in the early ‘70s. It passed down to me and I have since given it to my brother in-law and bought a Unisaw. But in the ‘80s he had the magic smoke happen. I think it’s a 1.5 or 1.75 horse. He just took it off and had it rebuilt and it’s running fine today. Are there no shops that do this anymore? Seems that in my area they’ve all dried up except for very large motors. But I’ll be the 1st to admit I wouldn’t have a clue even where to look. I guess break out the old paper yellow pages? Same goes for alternators and starters. Used to be that you could drop them off most anywhere and come back and pick it up all fixed and ready to go.

My Unisaw came from a vo-tech, so it just has to have a ton of runtime on it. I was contemplating going through it while I had the top off, but it runs fine, and it’s easy enough to get off, so I didn’t bother. I’ll just do it when that time comes.

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#13 posted 03-09-2015 08:33 PM

LOL.. if the magic smoke escapes, it’s toast. Usually means that the windings have been fried or something else has worn to the point of shorting out. It can be rewound, but that is a pricey proposition. However, if it still runs, even if sparking a bit, it usually can be salvaged, and is usually a bad bearing that is letting things get out of tolerance. There really isn’t much that can go wrong with an electric motor except the bearings, and once they get too bad off, it can cause lots of damage/destruction. When they ‘rebuild’ them, usually all they are doing is cleaning it up and replacing the bearings.

As for motor shops, they still exist. We have one locally and I’m not in what most would consider a large city by any stretch. Most alternator/generator shops will also do electric motors. I have visited our local one a time or two, but looking for parts such as a replacement spring for a centrifugal switch or a spring washer. Usually, they will dig through their pile of old dead motors to find one and give it to me for free.

For the Unisaw, or any used machinery with an unknown past, it’s usually best to replace the bearings before doing anything else with it. Not knowing how much use/abuse it may have received over it’s lifetime or when the bearings were last replaced, if at all, can cause all sorts of damage down the road if they are questionable. It’s really cheap insurance, and worth the effort even if things appear to be just fine. In the Baldor that I just replaced the bearings on, it ran and sounded perfect.. no signs of any problem at all. But once I opened it up, this is what I found:

It was leaking grease big time; and while it still worked fine, it would have been toast pretty quickly with any kind of use. Had I left it alone, it may very well have caused some serious damage that would be much more expensive to fix than the $17 I shelled out for new bearings. Just saying.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View David_H's profile

David_H

90 posts in 783 days


#14 posted 03-09-2015 08:42 PM

Those 1 hp motors do not have regular bearings, they have sleeve bearings, hence the oil plugs in the case. You should open it up anyway and check out the inside make sure that it is not full of saw dust.

If it is truely dead, let me know I could use one of the end caps, as I destroyed the one on mine finding out that it was a sleeve bearing not a traditional ball bearing. This is what it looks like:

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MrUnix

4231 posts in 1664 days


#15 posted 03-09-2015 08:46 PM

Those 1 hp motors do not have regular bearings, they have sleeve bearings

Not all… many have ball bearings. But if you have oil caps, then yes, it has sleeve bearings and felt oilers (which actually will last much longer than a ball bearing if maintained properly). The cheaper fractional motors like you would find in HVAC units are where you will generally find them the most.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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