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Unscrew super tight screws Dewalt 611PK baseplates

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Forum topic by sportflyer1 posted 03-08-2015 07:37 PM 666 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sportflyer1

24 posts in 668 days


03-08-2015 07:37 PM

The base plate screws are super tight so much so I cant simply unscrew them with just a Phillips head screw driver. Afraid to strip the screw head. I managed to remove the screws in the fixed base only by using WD 40 on the screws on the top side ( the housing side) so the WD 40 does not touch the plastic plate.

However for the plunge base I can only apply WD 40 to the screw head side. So my question is whether WD 40 will attack the plastic base?

I dont have an impact crew driver to help me. Any other ideas? Tks


8 replies so far

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#1 posted 03-08-2015 07:40 PM

Cheers,
Brad

PS: WD-40 will not harm the plastic.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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gwilki

121 posts in 940 days


#2 posted 03-08-2015 11:42 PM

You would be better off with a true penetrating oil, rather than WD40. Buy something specific to loosening stuck screws, spray liberally, and let it set over night.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1418 days


#3 posted 03-09-2015 12:51 AM

Hey Brad-Unix

Can you elaborate on how your picture solves the problem?

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#4 posted 03-09-2015 01:03 AM

Can you elaborate on how your picture solves the problem?

Phillips bit in a rachet.. I’ve broke loose many a screw that was otherwise impossible short of using an impact driver. You get a LOT more torque. Just make sure the bit fits properly.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You can either use a phillips bit socket, or use a 1/4 socket and one of those 1/4 bits that are used in the multi-tip screwdrivers. Either will work.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#5 posted 03-09-2015 01:13 AM

I would buy/borrow a small impact driver (you need one anyway!) as my first option with Brad’s option being my second choice. Use a NEW bit with no wear on it that fits the screws perfectly!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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firefighterontheside

13512 posts in 1323 days


#6 posted 03-09-2015 01:22 AM

Also you may want to tap the screw bit into the screw with a hammer first and then put the driver on the bit and turn. The tap may also free up the screw, but mainly it gets the bits seated into the screw head.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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sportflyer1

24 posts in 668 days


#7 posted 03-09-2015 03:17 AM

I will try Brad’s idea of increasing the applied torque . I will also get an manual impact driver.

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sportflyer1

24 posts in 668 days


#8 posted 03-09-2015 03:29 AM


I will try Brad s idea of increasing the applied torque . I will also get an manual impact driver.

- sportflyer1

I am happy to report that increasing torque with a ratchet worked like a charm :) Tks

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