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Forum topic by SlimPickins posted 03-08-2015 01:33 PM 988 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


03-08-2015 01:33 PM

Just curious if anyone knows what kind of wood this light-brown wood is – when it’s wet it reveals a sort of orangy color so let’s say it’s light brown but with a slight touch of orange. I picked it up and borrowed it from a construction worker one day in an emergency – I can ask them tomorrow what kind it is – they might know.

So it’s not that important.

When water gets on it, it really brings out the color so I would probably put a nice oil finish on it to make it splash that nice orange (perhaps touch of reddish) color.

I’m guessing some sort of pine but it’s texture although loose-grained and roughish does not seem like cedar – I have not yet put my nose to it – I’ll smell it today some time.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood


37 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 03-08-2015 02:06 PM

Most likely yellow pine.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#2 posted 03-08-2015 02:45 PM

Funny, it almost has the color of aged/seasoned Douglas Fir, but it seems lighter than that, so it could be yellow pine.

I’m going to go outside right now and weigh and volume a piece so I can check it’s density.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#3 posted 03-08-2015 02:58 PM

The wood database lists yellow pine at 35lbs and doug fir at 32 lbs. I’m working with both in my shop right now. I’ve got some really old doug fir and older yellow pine. The pine is much heavier just based in moving it around. I’m also using some newly kiln dried yellow pine that is lighter than the older stuff. The growth rings are about twice the size of the old growth stuff. Where a re ou located? Judging by the picture, it’s not in the south.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#4 posted 03-08-2015 03:14 PM

Ok, so I picked up the piece of lumber on the shopping cart and with me it weighed: 270.8 lbs.
Subtracting my weight with my coat and shoes and all and it was: 217.6 lbs so it weighs in at 53.2 lbs.

Volume of board that’s 12’10” long x 11 3/4” wide x 1 3/4” thick
11.75” x 154” x 1.75” = .979’ x 12.8333’ x .1458’ = 1.83 cu. ft.

Now subtract the notch’s volume: 23” x 2.375” x 1.75” = 1.916’ x .1979’ x .1458’ = .055 cu. ft.

so the total cu. ft. = 1.83 – .055 = 1.775 cu. ft.

53.2 lbs/1.775 cu. ft. = 29.86 lbs./cu. ft. density

So the board is 29.86 lbs./cu. ft. in weight density (it’s actually quite dry due to the frigid weather).

So I’ll check my numbers on Southern Yellow Pine and other pine species. Some southern yellows are
heavier, some about this. One thing for sure, Douglas Fir (that’s not old-growth heartwood) is only a little over 20 lbs/cu. ft. So it’s probably not Fir based on it’s density – even it’s texture is not like Fir. It’s color is
very close to Fir.

Ok, Fir, according to Firefighterontheside is about 32 lbs./cu. ft. That’s a nice dense wood. I believe the beams I have that are only 21 lbs/cu. ft must have been Eastern White Pine. So the wood I just measured could in theory still be Douglas Fir. We’ll get to the bottom of it. I was speaking of some architectural decorative beams I have – that have the coloring also of fir but lighter so they are Eastern Pine.

So its probably Fir or Southern Yellow or some other fairly dense pine. We’ll find out.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#5 posted 03-08-2015 03:16 PM

Tomorrow, I’lll ask the construction workers where the wood came from – I like the color because it matches the color of a tall pine tree on my front lawn – a shortleaf pine (southern yellow? blue spruce?) I don’t know, but boy do the colors look to be the same as the pine tree on my front lawn.

Sheeit, out there in Mizzou, you’ve got Black Walnut all over the place!

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#6 posted 03-08-2015 03:30 PM

Here’s some pics of the old growth yellow pine and doug fir that I’m working with, next to a new piece of yellow pine, which I believe is shortleaf. The Doug fir looks kind of pink, where the old pine is a very dark amber color.the new yellow pine is, well…......yellow.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#7 posted 03-08-2015 03:35 PM

Yes, all of my Douglas Fir (particularly young sappy Fir) has that Pinkish color.. When it ages, it turns a nicer red-brown. The Fir you show there is darker and nicer-looking. So the piece I have could still be Fir – it’s not yellowish, it’s more like orange-brown in color. But I’ll have to look closer to see if it has pinkish in the cut parts – where the grain shows.

If it were white oak, I would run a chemical test. I don’t know of one for Fir. Well, I’ll keep this one open for a few days.

Thanks for the pics of your woodworking lumber.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#8 posted 03-08-2015 03:37 PM

Yes, I do have some walnut in the barn that was cut locally and several logs still to be milled. A farmer friend of mine had some big walnut logs sitting near his wood pile. They had been sitting there for years. He said, these are walnut do you want them. Yessssss.
My property on the other hand is covered with loblolly, shortleaf, Virginia a few white pines and lots of oak.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#9 posted 03-08-2015 03:41 PM

Most Yellow Pine is denser than these pieces. So it could even be Eastern Spruce perhaps. Spruce is 28 lbs./cu. ft. dry.
Yellow Pines are much heavier generally. Even Eastern Spruce can be as dense as 28 lbs/cu. ft.

One thing though – the density of wood depends on whether it’s heart or sap sometimes. The sap is almost always less dense than the deadwood at the center. But this gets complicated. A true old-growth pine is extremely dense at the center, not just a little bit denser. It’s probably as dense as oak.

I was just using this table, which is short but has some idea of desnities:
http://www.oocities.org/steamgen/woodweights.pdf

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#10 posted 03-08-2015 03:47 PM

You’ve got nice pine on your property. We have pine, but I’m still trying to figure out the species – I need to get good at counting the needles and checking them fro smooth or rough shape, etc.. And I make tea out of the long-needle ones – medicinal. Doesn’t taste too good but has lots of Vitamin A and C.

Funny, you mention getting walnut, there’s a landscaper who lives only 7 miles from me who has 3 giant logs of black walnut. I plan to buy them from him when I can get my car and trailer out to him. He doesn’t want them!

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#11 posted 03-08-2015 03:49 PM

Right. That piece of old yellow pine(closest in picture) is about 1 1/4” thick and 7” wide. It weighs more than a newer piece that I have that is 11” wide and 1 1/4” thick. You can see this in the growth rings. The old piece has a ring about every 1/8” where the new growth stuff has growth rings that are about 3/8”.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#12 posted 03-08-2015 03:54 PM

What part of the country are you located in? I’ve got a few books that I like to use. One is a book that I got as a kid which is knowing your trees and another called Sylvics of North America.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#13 posted 03-08-2015 05:23 PM

I forgot to mention though, that the density of rings (when closer) could mean that the tree is growing slowly, in competition with other trees – this is old growth pine – dense forests of slow-growing trees. So faster growth does NOT necessarily mean stronger wood – kind of counter-intuitiive.

But it’s complicated.

Yeah, right now, I live in the Northeast, and I have one old tree book about the trees in North America. I can’t remember it’s name right now but I’ll fetch it some time.

I need to study that inner ring vs. outer ring concept more – I don’t really understand it all that well.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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SlimPickins

121 posts in 1381 days


#14 posted 03-08-2015 07:49 PM

Not that it matters much, but I just rechecked the width of the lumber, it’s 11 5/8”, not 11 3/4”, so it’s density is actuallly based on a smaller volume of:

11 5/8/11 3/4 * 1.775 cu. ft. = 1.756 cu. ft.

So the density is scaled by 0.98936 (the ratio of 11 5/8/11 3/4). So I had a little less wood than I thought
so the wood is denser by 1/0.98936 (I should have used 53.2 lbs/1.756 cu. ft. = 30.156 lbs/cu.ft)

So since 29.836/0.98936 = 30.156 lbs/cu. ft., it’s in the realm of whatever wood has that density. Who knows – perhaps it’s a different kind of Fir than I’m used to. I’ll keep working on this one.

-- If a bug can't eat it, it isn't good wood

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Rick M

7933 posts in 1847 days


#15 posted 03-09-2015 06:03 AM

My first instinct was yellow pine and I’m sticking with that based on what I can see.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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