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Forum topic by lethentymill posted 06-03-2009 10:56 AM 1999 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lethentymill

61 posts in 3068 days


06-03-2009 10:56 AM

Topic tags/keywords: green woodworking woodturning courses education learning saw sharpening spoon carving pole lathe shaving horse lathe

We wondered if any other LumberJocks forum members had either organised or attended green woodworking courses in the past. If so, what were your experiences? At Lethenty Mill Furniture, we are planning our first green woodworking course, which will run from Monday 20 – Friday 24 July. We are hoping to include topics such as saw sharpening, spoon carving, the use and construction of pole lathes and shaving horses and woodturning using the treadle-operated cast iron lathe. The emphasis will be on green woodworking in the North East of Scotland; there is very little information on this topic so setting up the course has been a challenge!

-- Allan Fyfe, Lethenty Mill Furniture, http://www.lethenty-mill.com


8 replies so far

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tomakazi

684 posts in 2743 days


#1 posted 06-03-2009 08:51 PM

do you mean green wood or green as in save the planet?

-- I didn't go to college, I was too busy learning stuff - Ted Nugent

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lethentymill

61 posts in 3068 days


#2 posted 06-04-2009 02:21 PM

Both ! – as there is no tradition of green woodworking ( i.e. wood straight from the tree ) in this part of Scotland I think I have freedom to pick and mix

-- Allan Fyfe, Lethenty Mill Furniture, http://www.lethenty-mill.com

View chickenhelmet's profile

chickenhelmet

99 posts in 2772 days


#3 posted 06-04-2009 04:04 PM

How about educating people about the benifts of using recycled/reclaimed lumber.(such as shipping palets) This cuts down on “embodied energy” costs like gas, carbon emissions, and pollution in general. Not mention it’s already cut down, out there, and dimensioned. (for the most part) You may also be able to get a little something extra out of it by charging a fee to haul it away. I also use shellac and water based “eco-freindly” stains and finishes. Hope this helps! Keep us posted. I for one am very interested in this topic. Good luck!

-- Larry , Colorado www.coloradorecordcrates.com

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3587 days


#4 posted 06-04-2009 04:55 PM

Allan:

We have a Green (raw) woodworking tradition here in Kentucky.
Riven wood artisans are common in my neck of the woods.

I’ll try to upload some info when I get some free time.

-- 温故知新

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lethentymill

61 posts in 3068 days


#5 posted 06-08-2009 04:38 PM

Thanks Larry and Andy
Good to hear from both of you – Keep in touch – I look forward to hearing more about the Riven wood artisans of Kentucky
Regards Allan

-- Allan Fyfe, Lethenty Mill Furniture, http://www.lethenty-mill.com

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3587 days


#6 posted 06-08-2009 09:49 PM

Allan:

Here’s a link to a video of one of my favorite riveneers, Don Weber.
I recently met up with Don at an event in Cincinnati, Ohio a few weeks ago.
We spent hours discussing his craft.
Don is a Welsh bodger living in Kentucky.

Don Weber video

There were six wood crafters giving demonstrations at this event in the in the same tent.
All six were rivers, all six brought their shaving horses, and all six were marvelous artisans.
They were bowl carvers, barrel makers, furniture makers, basket makers and bark crafters.
All started with raw wood and took it through to the final product.

There were two pole lathes spinning and lot’s of vintage tools chipping away at wood.

My wife, to her credit, left me in that tent for most of the day, before collecting me and taking me home. I left peacefully, but smelled green wood in my dreams for several days.

-- 温故知新

View Catspaw's profile

Catspaw

236 posts in 3275 days


#7 posted 06-08-2009 10:14 PM

Being a professional millwright, I’ve learned that hands tools are, many times, easier to use than power tools. With that in mind and because hand tools require no electrical input, I would suggest including the importance of building a stock of the best quality hand tools and how to keep them sharp. (It never ceases to amaze me how a quality, sharp hand tool can out shine a power tool.)

Wish I could attend…. part of the Campbell clan, once removed. Would like to see where part of me came from.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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lethentymill

61 posts in 3068 days


#8 posted 06-17-2009 10:59 AM

Thanks for the Don Weber video – due to technological reasons beyond my control, it has taken some time to get to view it! If you’ve not already done so and have the time, take a look at my own blog on this site – the movie that accompanies part 5 shows my own efforts in this area.

-- Allan Fyfe, Lethenty Mill Furniture, http://www.lethenty-mill.com

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