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Forum topic by daviddoria posted 03-07-2015 09:21 PM 586 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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daviddoria

66 posts in 1399 days


03-07-2015 09:21 PM

I am looking to make something like these frames:
http://www.ginasbaskets.com/images/walnutandhickoryframesB.JPG

where it is kind of a “frame inside a frame”. I’ve done this before where the two species were both the same thickness, so I just glued up a lamination, planed it flush, then built a normal mitered frame from that laminated stock. However, in these frames the outer frame is thicker than the inner frame, so I am wondering what the procedure would be? Do you make the inner frame, then just glue the outer frame pieces around it? It seems like this would be tough to do and get the back perfectly flush. How would you guys do it?

Thanks,

David


5 replies so far

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MrUnix

4206 posts in 1659 days


#1 posted 03-07-2015 09:32 PM

Shape the the frame stock to the correct profiles.. both species individually, then glue them together. Once you have them glued into a single piece of stock, cut your miters and glue them up just like you would any other frame.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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daviddoria

66 posts in 1399 days


#2 posted 03-07-2015 09:36 PM

Hi Brad,

I guess I’m just concerned that the glue up has to be better than I usually get because it will be very hard to flatten the back of the frame since it will no longer sit flat on a bench for planing etc because of the raised outer frame. You know what I mean? If that’s the only option though I guess I’ll give it a try haha.

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MrUnix

4206 posts in 1659 days


#3 posted 03-07-2015 09:42 PM

Not sure what you are saying about ‘flattening the back’.. basically, you are just gluing two different species of wood together with their backs flat anyway.. side by side in one long piece. Once you have the long stock glued up, it is no different than making any other frame. Am I missing something?

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: Are you saying that you plane the back of the frame stock after you glue them up into a frame? If so, why? It’s so much easier to plane, profile and rabbit the stock when it’s all one long piece.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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daviddoria

66 posts in 1399 days


#4 posted 03-07-2015 09:46 PM

I just mean that the glue up almost never ends up perfect – it usually needs a pass through the planer to make it really flush, or at the very least to get rid of the squeeze out. Is my gluing technique really that poor? I thought it was a pretty standard practice to flush most glue ups before proceeding?

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MrUnix

4206 posts in 1659 days


#5 posted 03-07-2015 10:23 PM

Not sure why you would need to run it through the planer. But if you are really determined to do so, just take your two dimensioned pieces of each species and glue them up into one big long dimensioned piece of stock. Run it through the planer or jointer to make them perfectly flush and remove any squeeze out, then form the profile and rabbit. Once profiled, miter and glue as usual. Seems like it would be much harder that way though. Might want to try using less glue or using a jointer, card scraper, hand plane, chisel or whatever to clean up the glue lines, which would be simpler. What you are trying to do is really pretty simple.. don’t make it harder than it needs to be!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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