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Forum topic by MyFathersSon posted 06-02-2009 12:08 AM 1661 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2776 days


06-02-2009 12:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question router

PATIENT Craftsman 17542 1/2” router mounted in table.

SYMPTOMS
Has worked GREAT for over a year. Had not used it in a while.
This weekend it sounded fine as it fired up – but I noticed what seemed like a strange ‘grinding’ sound when I turned it off.
SO—I blew it out top and bottom even lifted it out of of the table so I could blow it out ‘upright’.
All I was doing was some beading (radius groove bit in soft pine – no real load)
But as I worked I noticed it getting MUCH hotter than normal centering near the base and just not sounding right. Even the handles would have been too hot to hold.
SO – I stopped. Hopefully before I killed it entirely.

QUESTION——I don’t expect any solid solutions from such general symptoms but—-
Before I open her up—- any recommendations wheter there is a common cause for such symptoms that are ‘user serviceable’? Or should I just turn it over to Sears service?

Unfortunately – it is out of warranty so if they work on it – I am looking at minimum $60 to repair a $90 router.
Something I normally wouldnt even consider—but its less than 2 years old and until now has been fine.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.


19 replies so far

View olddutchman's profile

olddutchman

187 posts in 3398 days


#1 posted 06-02-2009 01:11 AM

I can only guess that the brushes are dirty, or need to be replaced. I have worked with buffers for many years, and the symptom is as you described. You will have to look for the screw cap that is 180 regrees from the other, remove the brush which should be attached to a wire and a thin washer with the wire where the hole should be. Clean it very carefully. I believe that alkacahol will leave no deposit carefully clean the armature with clean lint free cloth. the brushes are the blocks attached tp the wire, and one normally wears more that the other. replace if more than 1/2 is there, or there is evidence of the wire mount is showing. Hopefully, you will be able to take care of it. If you can see the brush area when it is runninf, there should be little spark showing. when dirty, or worn you will see a much larger spark trailling. this will be the sign to replace, or repair. I wish you well. It is not very hard to do, normally. altho some are much harder than others.

-- Saved, and so grateful, consider who Created it ALL!!!

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3024 days


#2 posted 06-02-2009 02:15 AM

My guess is the bearing closest to the base has gone bad, since that is where the heat is hottest. Brushes are on the opposite end and don’t normally get that hot or make bad noises even when worn out.

-- Joe

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#3 posted 06-02-2009 03:43 AM

My guess would be the bearing too.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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John Gray

2370 posts in 3349 days


#4 posted 06-02-2009 05:25 AM

Bearing

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3485 days


#5 posted 06-02-2009 05:31 AM

Get a new set of brushes and a couple of bearings and you should be good for a while.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2776 days


#6 posted 06-02-2009 05:43 AM

Thanks guys—I had pretty much guessed bearings too.
The sound was very much like bad wheel bearings.
Also —I pulled it out of the mount and held it while it ran under no load and felt exactlywhere the heat was starting—opposite end from the motor.
The brushes on this one are very easily accessible – for lack of anything else to try I checked them and they looked fine.
I guess the heart of my question was—whether these bearings were considered a ‘user serviceable’ part.
I’ve taken lots of things apart over the years – and gotten MOST of them back together.
Just had never popped the case on a router.
Wanted to be sure from some who probably had—- that I wasnt also opening a can of worms.

Secondary question would be wondering what I did to kill them and how I can NOT do it again.
Heaviest bit I use is an interlocking miter—and that is in pine and poplar.
I do some work in Oak – but that is mostly rabbets and dadoes.
This is my 4th router in over 20 years—I tend to get a LOT more than one years use out of them.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#7 posted 06-02-2009 05:53 AM

I’ve never popped the case on a router either, so I don’t know if it is user friendly on that or not. If the bearings are that bad, I wonder if the shaft is damaged too??

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View olddutchman's profile

olddutchman

187 posts in 3398 days


#8 posted 06-02-2009 12:25 PM

You may have found the problem. The place of most consern is the brushes and commutator. The next thing is to hope that the bearing will slide out. I would think that it is worth your time to try, By the time that a professional is done, the router may be better replaced.

-- Saved, and so grateful, consider who Created it ALL!!!

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3024 days


#9 posted 06-02-2009 12:39 PM

Re: taking it apart, etc. – I’d go for it. There isn’t that much stuff inside, and what do you have to lose? It is junk now, taking it to a pro would cost more than it’s worth, and you might be able to fix it! (If it can’t be fixed, it would be an interesting paper weight. ;).

Re: Why was the life so short – Who knows, could have been a random failure. What you are doing doesn’t seem to be abusive, unless you are making cuts that are too deep with a lot of side load on the bit. The main reason might be that it was a “cheap” router to begin with. Next time I’d go with a PC, Dewalt, etc. (Check the “My Router Died” thread to see what’s popular.

-- Joe

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Steelmum

355 posts in 3426 days


#10 posted 06-02-2009 01:26 PM

Give it a try. What can you hurt? It is already broke, if you fix it, great, if not, SHOPPING! Looks like a win, win to me.

Gotta have fun

-- Berta in NC

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2776 days


#11 posted 06-02-2009 02:44 PM

ajose—you are right about the use—
I DID make about 20 kitchen doors in April—LOTS of rabbets—but always in 2 passes.
Nothing I haven’t done before with routers half this size.
Oddly it was still running fine.

Guess that means you may be right on the quality
I was raised on Craftsman, Black and Decker, Stanley and Skil.
And I was rarely if ever let down by any of them.
I tend to stick with what has worked for me in the past.
But – sadly—times change—and not always for the better.

Thanks for the encouragement.
You are right—it cant be much worse than a motorcycle clutch or a strarter.
I am a tinkerer by nature. A trait that has gotten me into about as much trouble as it has gotten me out of.
Just getting cautious in my old age – wanted to be sure there wasn’t something specific to routers that make self-help hazardous.

Fortunately – I have a spare that will get me through this current project.
Then I can tear into it.

Thanks again.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3048 days


#12 posted 06-02-2009 03:26 PM

my 2 cents toss it out and buy a new one I woudn’t waste 60 bucks fixing this if it’s so badly worn out.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View olddutchman's profile

olddutchman

187 posts in 3398 days


#13 posted 06-19-2009 08:31 PM

Let us know how the router is turning out. It’s nice to follow the results, it gives us all something to check if ours heads south.

-- Saved, and so grateful, consider who Created it ALL!!!

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2776 days


#14 posted 06-26-2009 04:01 AM

Thanks for asking—managed to get everything done that required table before the router died—been busy with other parts of the project—oh and my ‘real’ job.
Sitting here now—I managed to get the top off revealing the shaft—
Upper bearing is fine—turns smooth and quiet—that leaves the only other source of friction the lower bearing – and you can definitely hearing it grinding—-
TROUBLE IS—I cant figure out how to remove the shaft to get to the lower bearing.
Yes – I removed the lock ring from the outside of the housing
Looking at the base of the housing I see what appears to be the end of three screws screwed into the base
But looking down inside the housing – I see no way to get to them—just a black shield of some kind around the shaft.
Any suggestions would be welcome.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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olddutchman

187 posts in 3398 days


#15 posted 06-26-2009 12:36 PM

You may find some help from this site: http://powertool.manualsonline.com/

-- Saved, and so grateful, consider who Created it ALL!!!

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