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Best glue for prefinished plywood?

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Forum topic by eldercop posted 03-07-2015 01:37 PM 839 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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eldercop

58 posts in 973 days


03-07-2015 01:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glue kitchen cabinets question

Hi all
SWMBO is making some can storage for the kitchen cabs I’m building (ah togetherness) Her plan has gluing 1/4 in ply “ramps” to the sides which we cut from prefinished maple ply scrap. I use TB II and TBIII mostly but doubt the hold to the finished pieces. Epoxy? Gorilla? any experience out there? Thanks
Geo

-- "Experience is what you get the day after you needed it" Mark Twain


11 replies so far

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Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1116 days


#1 posted 03-07-2015 01:53 PM

TB will pop right off. Gorilla bonds perfectly. I did a little test when gluing my cabs together because I didn’t want to dado or sand through the finish. Just be careful of the foam.

-- -Dan

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eldercop

58 posts in 973 days


#2 posted 03-07-2015 02:02 PM

wow, thanks Dan. Never used Monkey stuff. is the foam like squeeze out?

-- "Experience is what you get the day after you needed it" Mark Twain

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Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1116 days


#3 posted 03-07-2015 02:14 PM

Gorilla glue foams as it dries. It will foam out from between cracks and it’s easiest to wipe it off while wet rather than cut it off after its dry.

-- -Dan

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eldercop

58 posts in 973 days


#4 posted 03-07-2015 02:23 PM

Thanks Dan, imaging paper towel and water? solvent? The unfinished parts 1/4 inch parts, birch ply, will be getting a clear finish as well.

g

-- "Experience is what you get the day after you needed it" Mark Twain

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3041 days


#5 posted 03-07-2015 02:44 PM

Most wood glues will hold if you do a light sanding on the glue joint to scuff off the finish, it takes about 10 seconds per joint with some 100 grit sandpaper.you just have to make sure you’re not sanding the exposed part of the cabinets. As Dan says you can use a polyurethane glue too.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2314 days


#6 posted 03-07-2015 02:49 PM

TOO Much poly glue & you’ll have a BOATLOAD of clean up and realize what a PITA poly glue can be, if you want a neat and clean install that you’ll be able to finish over, I strongly reccomend you go with a1Jim’s advice and sand the finish, make a small sanding block to fit the size of where you need to sand and remove the finish. Woud also reccomend brads or pins to help keep things in place

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2329 days


#7 posted 03-07-2015 03:37 PM

Shoo Goo, Household Goop, etc all of the varieties hold on glossy surfaces very good. You can stick a piece of polished stainless steel to glass with that stuff.

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Rick

8287 posts in 2497 days


#8 posted 03-08-2015 05:42 AM

What A1Jim said. I’ve done exactly that before and just used regular Carpenters glue and wipe off any ooze while it’s still wet.

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

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Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#9 posted 03-08-2015 03:21 PM

I use blue masking tape along glue joints to keep squeeze out glue from getting on the wrong places.

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kKirk

8 posts in 693 days


#10 posted 03-09-2015 08:15 PM

I’ve been researching for a melamine kitchen cabinet build I have coming up. I’ve found that Tightbond has a melamine glue (purple label) or ‘Roo Glue’ is recommended. I don’t know if either of those would work on a prefinished plywood like you are after.

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eldercop

58 posts in 973 days


#11 posted 03-09-2015 10:12 PM

Thanks! By the way I have used TB’s melamine glue and it works like a bandit. Used it in building shop cabinets. The only rule with it is that one surface must be melamine and the other must be raw wood or a cut edge of melamine,

-- "Experience is what you get the day after you needed it" Mark Twain

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