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Short stop electric motor brake

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Forum topic by daddywoofdawg posted 03-07-2015 04:39 AM 1309 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1040 days


03-07-2015 04:39 AM

I’m looking at a table saw that has a Short stop electric motor brake.Is that like a saw stop function or something diffrent?


10 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 03-07-2015 06:46 AM



I m looking at a table saw that has a Short stop electric motor brake.Is that like a saw stop function or something diffrent?

Different. It’s just an electronic brake that works by injecting DC voltage into the windings.. it will stop a motor faster than what it would normally take just free wheeling to a stop, but not instantly. It’s primary usefulness is to replace mechanical brakes which need routine maintenance and the resulting down time from that maintenance; typically in a production environment where down time is lost productivity. For the technical info on them, you can visit their web site: http://www.saldet.com/

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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skatefriday

380 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 03-07-2015 06:56 AM

Not at all the same. Nobody but SawStop has flesh detection, which
is really a current change, we are sending voltage thought the blade,
oops something suddenly went to ground, stop the saw within milliseconds!

As I watch the saw on my Grizzly wind down however, I often wish
I had a brake on it. If I’m ever looking at a finger laying on the table
I’m pretty sure I’d wish I had that flesh detection.

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JeffP

573 posts in 857 days


#3 posted 03-07-2015 01:52 PM

There are lots of potential uses for one of these DC brakes in a woodshop.

Unfortunately, a little bit of googling suggests that nobody is making a good business of it. The link provided by Brad above didn’t yield any pricing info at all or even a visible link to find dealers.

Further googling did not turn up any viable retail solutions for a typical woodworker. One does not simply go to woodcraft or amazon and click “buy it now” to order up a DC injection brake for a piece of WW equipment.

That’s unfortunate, as it would be both a time-saver and (while not in the same league as Saw Stop), a significant safety improvement for any tool with a rapidly spinning blade.

Any of you been more successful at finding a turn-key and retail-available implementation of this tech?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 688 days


#4 posted 03-07-2015 03:56 PM

I wish my BS has an elect brake it takes forever to stop and sometimes I forget about it to keep working and neglect to release tension on the band.

-- I meant to do that!

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MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#5 posted 03-07-2015 05:14 PM

Unfortunately, a little bit of googling suggests that nobody is making a good business of it. The link provided by Brad above didn’t yield any pricing info at all or even a visible link to find dealers.

A quick google turned up a few sources:
https://www.google.com/search?q=short-stop+motor+brake

There are actually a few available from Amazon in the $600-$1000ish range depending on voltage and current ratings, but they all appear to be 3-phase units. More can be found on e-bay, in the same basic price range. Kind of pricey for a home shop though, where a 3-phase motor and VFD would be a cheaper solution with more advantages than just the braking. However, if the saw in question does have one of these things, it might be worthwhile (depending on asking price) to get the saw, remove the short-stop device and sell it on e-bay to recover the money paid for the saw (and maybe even make some in the deal!).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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JeffP

573 posts in 857 days


#6 posted 03-07-2015 05:36 PM

“neglect to release tension on the band.”

Really? Is one supposed to do that between uses?


I wish my BS has an elect brake it takes forever to stop and sometimes I forget about it to keep working and neglect to release tension on the band.

- Ghidrah

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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Bobbal

27 posts in 653 days


#7 posted 03-07-2015 11:51 PM

When I was in junior high school (post Jurassic) we had a Rockwell Delta RAS that ran on 220. The blade would spin for close to 2 minutes before stopping. They installed one of those brakes on it. It worked like a charm. That was one sweet saw.

-- Why measure twice when you can cut twice?

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exelectrician

2327 posts in 1893 days


#8 posted 03-08-2015 12:28 AM

If you did this, would the nut that holds the blade loosen, seeing that it would repeatedly have start torque and then hard braking torque?

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#9 posted 03-08-2015 12:35 AM

If you did this, would the nut that holds the blade loosen, seeing that it would repeatedly have start torque and then hard braking torque?

It’s not hard breaking and the slow down period is adjustable.. same situation as using a VFD where you can specify how slow you want it to stop. Stop too fast and yes, you can spin off whatever it is you are using; saw blade arbor nut, lathe chuck, etc..

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1061 posts in 3079 days


#10 posted 03-08-2015 01:44 AM

“neglect to release tension on the band.”

Really? Is one supposed to do that between uses?

Opinions on this are mixed. My grandfather had a huge bandsaw (>30”) and never released tension. I have a much smaller bandsaw (10”) and never release the tension. my grandfather had no problems in 25+ years.. I have no problems in 4 years.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

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