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longworth chucks

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Forum topic by 3285jeff posted 03-06-2015 02:53 AM 1159 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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3285jeff

152 posts in 1182 days


03-06-2015 02:53 AM

I have been thinking about getting a longworth chuck ,,,I have been looking at the cole jaws also,, you can get the cole jaws a lot cheaper,,,can anyone tell me the different in the two,,both appears to do the same thing,,,and for what the longworth chuck costs,,,you could actually buy another chuck and add the cole jaws for not much difference in the price of the longworth,,I know you can build the longworth chuck and there is plans to do that,,but I don’t have the time,,,i work everyday,,so if anyone could give me a few comments on this I would appreciate it,,thank you


9 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1885 posts in 1599 days


#1 posted 03-06-2015 01:46 PM

Not sure what inexpensive chucks & jaws you are looking at but no way cheaper than commercial Longworth Chuck. You can a quality chuck body, threaded insert, and any jaws you want!

Oneway Talon chuck body $143, threaded adapter $25, jumbo jaws for talon; 9” jaw set $90 and 11” jaw set $100.

Nova SN2 chuck body $180, threaded insert $26, Cole jaws; mini 8” $74 and larger one $95

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=chuck-fourjaw

You can buy a 10” Longworth chuck for about $139-$140 without shipping cost. A quality chuck plus Cole or Jumbo jaw set going to cost lot more. Do the math!

http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/103/4604/RMWoodCo-Modern-Longworth-Chuck

Everything has its advantages and disadvantages Cole-jaws depending upon the chuck simpler to set up (single key verus tommy bar chuck). That advantage might go away with commercial Longworth chuck verus homemade. Have to watch which version Longworth chuck you buy one model out there does not work with Oneway jaw set.

Have to watch lathe speed because neither cole jaws nor Longworth chuck that great in either compression or expansion mode if you are prone to catches while turning! Also if your bowl blank has gone oval or rim no longer flat.

Donut Chucks far safer even if have to fuss a bit to get aligned properly. Jam chucks with or without tailstock support even simpler and safe! No do not want to turn lathe speed up to R-for race without tailstock support using a jam chuck!

-- Bill

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1194 days


#2 posted 03-06-2015 02:50 PM

Or, you could get this for $150, and all you need is a face plate to make Rim or Jamb Chucks or friction plates. Chucks aren’t an issue as this mounts into your tail stock. It holds at any speed, but so far all I’ve done is up to 1725 rpm. If your tail stock doesn’t creep, you can’t loose pieces unless they explode.
If you had a vacuum, Longworth Chuck of Cole Jaws, this would be extra security. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 765 days


#3 posted 03-06-2015 03:27 PM

Between the two (Longsworth or Cole) I would go with the Longsworth as you do not need to unscrew and move the pins. That said, I do not use either because I have read enough of items being orbited and the jaws sitting in a drawer collecting dust. I’m sure lots of folks love and use them.
I just use a friction chuck. Yes I do have to clean off the little nub off of the lathe but that only takes a couple of minutes. I did get Vinces 1” disc set for when I have a small base and the 2” will not fit.
The one Jerry shows looks real nice and easy.
If I had/made one it would be the donut chuck as Bill brought up.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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OSU55

1058 posts in 1454 days


#4 posted 03-06-2015 04:53 PM

PSI has a cole jaw/jumbo jaw/chuck set up for 14” for $130 http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LCJC14.html. No direct experience but I have read longworth style chucks tend to have excessive run out. I suspect most of the “orbiting” stories when using flat jaws or longworth chucks are folks attempting to do too much on the back side – they are intended for making light cuts and a little sanding to finish the bowl bottom, not cutting the backside of the bowl. There are many methods to accomplish this task.

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3555 posts in 2025 days


#5 posted 03-06-2015 07:45 PM

Jeff

You can do this two ways

A link below to making a Longworth chuck

http://www.woodworkersguide.com/2010/10/17/how-to-make-a-longworth-chuck/

Or even better is to get a vacuum chuck which is a very good price which I bought from a man called Bob

http://www.frugalvacuumchuck.com/

It comes with everything you need and just assemble. Bob is a terrific guy and I am so glad I got it. It is also about the same as buying a Longworth chuck at $220 when I got it. The Hg is at 27 and he also has a muffler with it too so you do not hear it

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3127 days


#6 posted 03-06-2015 10:18 PM

No direct experience but I have read longworth style chucks tend to have excessive run out.

Yes and no … depends on two things:

1) How carefully the chuck halves are cut. My first one was done in plywood with a router, and was okay at first but the cheap plywood warped creating a real problem. My current one was done in 1/2” thick plastic by a friend with a CNC machine … it runs dead on.

2) Leave the divot from your live center in the bottom of the bowl and use your tailstock to align the workpiece in the Longworth’s rubber stoppers. When rtightening the stoppers, I find it best to use the procedure Ron Brown details in his YouTube video: http://youtu.be/gMG58c_haqE

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2227 days


#7 posted 03-17-2015 04:23 PM

I bought one of “them” longworth chucks – wouldn’t do it again. They adjust on a sliding scale type mechanism. Once you get it adjusted to the size of the object to be turned/finished, it will slowly expand with centrifugal force, no matter how much excessive force the bolts/wing nuts are tightened. I even disassembled the thing and roughened the surfaces between the two mounting plates to produce some friction. Did not work! I also used some extra bolts, with locknuts and lock washers, which helped. Now, I only have to tighten 12 bolt/nut/washer combinations to keep it in place. What a hassle! The only thing good that came out of the whole process was the silicone bumpers that came with it, which I use on my cole jaws. I complained about it to the vendor at the AAW Symposium in Phoenix last year – response, none.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1194 days


#8 posted 03-17-2015 04:44 PM



I bought one of “them” longworth chucks – wouldn t do it again. They adjust on a sliding scale type mechanism. Once you get it adjusted to the size of the object to be turned/finished, it will slowly expand with centrifugal force, no matter how much excessive force the bolts/wing nuts are tightened. I even disassembled the thing and roughened the surfaces between the two mounting plates to produce some friction. Did not work! I also used some extra bolts, with locknuts and lock washers, which helped. Now, I only have to tighten 12 bolt/nut/washer combinations to keep it in place. What a hassle! The only thing good that came out of the whole process was the silicone bumpers that came with it, which I use on my cole jaws. I complained about it to the vendor at the AAW Symposium in Phoenix last year – response, none.
- Jimbo4

Thanks, Jimbo, that’s a real good argument for using my invention shown in reply #2…...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View jfoobar's profile

jfoobar

39 posts in 795 days


#9 posted 03-18-2015 04:59 PM



I bought one of “them” longworth chucks – wouldn t do it again.

We probably own the same one. I bought mine on a whim at a symposium a few years ago. It is the one usually sold as a “Modern Longworth Chuck” that has a black body and red nubs.

I do NOT recommend it, most especially considering what it costs. I haven’t had the creep issues that Jimbo4 describes but it does not really hold pieces well at all, even bowls with flared rims that it should hold well. I still use mine occasionally but always tape the piece to the chuck using several long pieces of painters tape to be sure. I would not buy it again.

I have never tried to make my own but have to feel that a donut chuck is a better bet.

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