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Outfeed table design--why not a grid?

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Forum topic by wildbill001 posted 03-05-2015 11:23 PM 1063 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wildbill001

111 posts in 2104 days


03-05-2015 11:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw outfeed

I need to add an outfeed table to my R4512. Every outfeed table I have seen so far is usually a solid top with slots that act as extensions for the miter-gauge slots. My question is why not use a grid instead (think lattice work)?

Seems like a grid would be lighter putting less stress on the back rail of the saw as well as less likely to make the saw more difficult to roll around. And I need to be able to move my saw around to allow SWMBO’s car into the garage.

Am I missing something or some reason why a grid would be a bad idea for an outfeed table?

TIA

Bill W.

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown


16 replies so far

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 689 days


#1 posted 03-05-2015 11:29 PM

I built a simple assembly table with 2×6 that have a 1 inch gap between them so I could get clamps down between them for glue ups and assembly. Found out just by accident its a hair shorter than the top of my TB table, so when I need an out feed table I just push it up to the out feed area of my TS ….. WAL LA!

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

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Mykos

102 posts in 1256 days


#2 posted 03-05-2015 11:32 PM

A solid table will work with any sized piece coming off. A grid will have gaps that stock can fall in or get hung up on. If that happens during the middle of cut it’s bad news.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#3 posted 03-05-2015 11:44 PM

What he said

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JeffP

573 posts in 853 days


#4 posted 03-06-2015 01:14 AM

Maybe a compromise between solid and “grid”...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K81qQofCeM

He made what he calls a “torsion box”. Basically two relatively thin sheets around a “grid” of thin support pieces.

You could also consider a pre-made one of these kind of table tops in the form of an interior grade door repurposed as a table-top. It would be light weight but stiff and strong and would not have any holes that wood can drop into.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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Tugboater78

2446 posts in 1654 days


#5 posted 03-06-2015 01:24 AM

How bout something like mike mertze made
https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=5esk9dgCzCQ

Based on Ron paulks workbench.

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

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MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#6 posted 03-06-2015 02:08 AM

When I use my planer, the boards will hang up on anything that is not dead flat and smooth. I would expect the same thing if you had a grid and the board was ever so slightly bowed downward when ripped on the table saw.

I wouldn’t do it.

My table does have clamp tracks in it but they run parallel to the boards and haven’t presented any problems.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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wildbill001

111 posts in 2104 days


#7 posted 03-06-2015 05:53 PM

I understand about the risk of material catching as it comes off the saw. But I see so many table-saws with grid-like wings that I thought that might work for the outfeed.

The idea of the torsion box is a good one although I don’t think I need to go to the level of detail that Mike Mertze went to.

Ok, so maybe back to the drawing board.

Thanks folks!

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#8 posted 03-06-2015 06:41 PM

The hgt of my work bench is the same as the TS the bench is 30” X 80” and had wheels at one end.

-- I meant to do that!

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Earlextech

1159 posts in 2152 days


#9 posted 03-06-2015 07:22 PM

My out-feed is a torsion box, built 30 years ago! It makes my table saw size overall – 6’ x 10’. I made the outside corner perfectly square to easily square up anything I need. Covered with white laminate that I might change out finally this year! It’s my workbench, assembly table, table saw all together.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2100 days


#10 posted 03-06-2015 08:28 PM

I think you could make something with a solid part in line with the blade and a grid farther to the left and right. Then, small stuff wouldn’t fall through or get hung up, and large stuff could slide fine on the grid. You could even make the parts of the grid in-line with the motion of the boards a trifle higher than the cross pieces – which basicly are only for structure.

... but, a torsion box with thin skin would be stiffer…

-Paul

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MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#11 posted 03-06-2015 09:22 PM

If I didn’t already have a good strong frame for my bench, I would make a table like Ron Paulk. I bought his plans for reference and used the idea on my miter saw station. Sometimes it is nice to have those holes available, sometimes not because they are in the wrong spot! :-)

My current work surface is a outfeed table, assembly table and anything else I need it for including clamping and gluing.

My worktable
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68635

Mobile Workstation. (Two thumbs u for this one!)
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/92907

Adjustable Height Work Table/Dual Router Station (Four Thumbs up!)
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/101964

Miter Saw Station (There are several blog entries on building the miter saw station…at least four.)
http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/36618

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#12 posted 03-06-2015 10:52 PM

I don’t have a picture but my outfeed is similar to a ladder except square and uses pvc spaced several inches apart. The pipe is cut in half and fixed to the “rungs”. The rounded edges prevent boards from getting stuck and pvc is very slick. It works great for my purposes.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Tugboater78

2446 posts in 1654 days


#13 posted 03-07-2015 12:49 AM

Mike, thanks for posting links to your mitersaw blog. I remember when you first started it, it caught my interest cause i was thinking of a similar setup, but couldnt follow at the time and slipped my mind.

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

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DaveHuber

43 posts in 2579 days


#14 posted 03-07-2015 01:10 AM

The grid presents a very good opportunity to pinch your fingers between work sliding across it and the grid.

DAMHIK

Nasty

-- Dave, Oak Park, IL

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redryder

2394 posts in 2564 days


#15 posted 03-07-2015 05:52 AM

I have this outfeed roller system on my saw and love it.
Put it up or put it down. Great space saver when needed….....................

-- mike...............

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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