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Forum topic by Jen posted 05-29-2009 08:28 PM 1478 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


05-29-2009 08:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tools rustic mission style arts and crafts newbie michigan imlay city first tool suggestions

Hi everyone! I’m new to this site and appreciate all of the great posts I have received. It’s very welcoming indeed. I feel so at home, even as one of the rare “Jockettes”! :-)

So, I have big plans and need some guidance if you will. My first project I think, will be a log bed. King size. I don’t believe I will need many specialized tools for that. I have an e-mail in to one of our fellow LumberJocks for the plans for the log bed he had made (he offered the plans to anyone who asked) and I’m just waiting on them to begin. If anyone else has plans for an all log Log Bed, I would appreciate getting those as well.

I have desired to do woodworking for a very long time. I have two problems. I need Ty Pennington to come over and re-do my very unorganized and overwhelming (large) shed into a workshop (there are already some nice, old cabinets in the back of the “shed”. Or, I could use my VERY large barn as well. Hmmmmm, that’s an idea!

So, the other issue I have is no woodworking-specific tools. I have a circular saw, which I hate using. I used to use a table saw and what I think is called a radial arm saw, and I like those but I don’t own them. I think what keeps me from really getting into woodworking is having good tools and the proper tools for the job which makes it much more enjoyable. Now, my question is: what would you suggest I get first? If I do any kind of wood working, my first projects would be rustic and perhaps mission-style furniture or things that are for function (things I need around the house). Later on I would like to dabble in fun things like boxes, toys, chess sets, etc.

If all goes well and I enjoy this like I think I will, I would like to sell some projects.

Thanks for reading!!!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.


43 replies so far

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 2834 days


#1 posted 05-29-2009 08:51 PM

Hi Jen, a table saw would be my first choice followed by a jointer. The table saw with a good fence such a a Biesmeyer or similar will give you solid and square ripping and cross cutting capability in one tool. A good sharp combination blade with a good miter gauge would start your shop off on the right foot. A modest contractor saw would be a good start. All the manufactures have great selections. My first saw came from Craigslist for a song. Good luck in bringing your shop to life.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2724 posts in 2899 days


#2 posted 05-29-2009 09:02 PM

Hi Jen, I agree – my most valuable tool right now is a table saw. I got a Grizzley 0575 (I think) and it came with a nice Shop Fox fence thus saving me the $$ for the Biesmeyer. A good router is a must. I also use my mitre saw and band saw a lot. I also have a small lunch box planer and a 6” jointer that isn’t the top of the line but works well. I do think the most important part of the workshop are the blades – good blades are worth the extra $$.
I think there are more than a “few” women on this site. Everyone is very welcoming and very helpful.
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3685 days


#3 posted 05-29-2009 09:07 PM

I agree with kerfless that a table saw shouid be at the top of the list, followed by a band saw, in my opinion. On the hand tools side, of course, hammer, mallet, chisels, scrapers, a couple of planes….

This question comes up a lot, and I think the best answer is probably to let your needs dictate your purchases. As you decide what project you want to make, and start making it, you will find out what tools are a necessity for that project. Some future project will require something else, so you’ll want to buy one of those (whatever it happens to be).

To some extent, you can adjust your construction methods to fit the tools you have on hand. But you will always be running into a situation where you just can’t do something without an “xyz”. Then that becomes the next tool you should purchase.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#4 posted 05-29-2009 09:24 PM

Kerflesss,

Thanks for the advice!!! I will definitely check out Craig’s List for this. I have been on there a lot, but didn’t think of using it for this. (duh!) lol :-) Thanks for your recommendation!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#5 posted 05-29-2009 09:24 PM

Kerflesss,

Thanks for the advice!!! I will definitely check out Craig’s List for this. I have been on there a lot, but didn’t think of using it for this. (duh!) lol :-) Thanks for your recommendation!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#6 posted 05-29-2009 09:27 PM

Ellen,

Thanks so much for your suggestions! Also, I wouldn’t have thought to put more money into the blades, but that makes a lot of sense. Glad to see I’m not the only woman here!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#7 posted 05-29-2009 09:32 PM

That makes sense Charlie. I agree that this is probably what I’ll end up doing. I’m just so “green” at this, that I wouldn’t know what to get first. Besides, I have this terrible habit of not being so patient (sorry Charlie!) so I may not realize that I could be using some other tool to help me better. Then it would be firewood!!!

Thanks everyone. Just that little bit of advice causes me to feel more confident going into this. Now to go and check Craig’s List and re-do my barn!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3052 days


#8 posted 05-29-2009 09:32 PM

Jen my dear A hearty welcome most of us have many many tools, as said a table saw is number 1 followed by a bandsaw, then a plane,r and thicknesser, or as you say jointer. Anyway it really depends after that, if you want to be highly mechanised or do much hand work, in which case hand saws, planes, etc would be welcome .We have a lot of very gifted women in this world most of them smarter than we boys if we are honest, so a hearty welcome and please ask for guidance whenever you feel the need, as there are many great people here who are very generous with their time etc yours Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#9 posted 05-29-2009 10:03 PM

Hi Alistair! Thank you so much for writing to me! Warm welcomes are always—- well, welcome! I will be sure to ask if I need anything. It’s not always easy though, cuz even us girls have egos! haha Actually, I will be asking a lot of questions in the coming months or so. You may regret telling me that! :-)

Have an awesome day!

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3052 days


#10 posted 05-29-2009 10:10 PM

we need more ladies here the more the better.I think there still exists an old fashioned attitude here in the uk towards women and their capabilities .Let me make it clear I worked in a dental surgery for five years in Germany then west Germany and worked with mostly 50% women and men and the girls were very very good at their work so I am an emacipated man and find that we guys need to wake up look at Alisons work first rate and no mistake welcome welcome welcome my dear lady.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#11 posted 05-29-2009 10:14 PM

Thank you!!! You’re a dear, sweet gentleman. It’s an honor to know you.

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3115 days


#12 posted 05-29-2009 10:14 PM

Welcome aboard Jen.

I agree with Charlie. Table saw as a fundemental tool to get your lumber straight and cut, and a bandsaw for the curves, resawing, and the safer rip cuts of rough lumber. accompanied with several handtools like planes and chisels and a hammer will take you a long way -

for milling lumber – you can start by getting milled lumber at the local lumberyard, which will reduce your overhead on that part, or you could use handplanes to start up. of course- if you are going to be doing log construction – milling will be the least of your worries.

once you feel comfortable and want to mill your own lumber – you could go the planer, and then jointer route (and yes – a router should also be in the top of the list) and then you could buy your rough lumber, and mill it to your needs.

Have fun. and dont really make Ty THAT big of a deal – you can do it better then him… just give yourself the time.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Jen's profile

Jen

28 posts in 2752 days


#13 posted 05-29-2009 10:26 PM

Thanks Purp! I guess you’re right about milling. I will be doing a lot of log construction at first, so I won’t really need to consider that right away. I’m still learning about what all these tools are for!

As for Ty, well, let’s just say I’m not very patient and would like someone to come in and redo the space right quick! :-) I do know that I could make the space more personal than he could. Better? I’ll have to wait and see on that one! lol

Thanks again.

-- Jen - Imlay City, MI ~~ People laugh at me because I am different, I laugh at them because they are all the same.

View kimball's profile

kimball

323 posts in 2764 days


#14 posted 05-29-2009 10:52 PM

Hi Jen,
One of the most important of all tools you already have, SPACE!
he tablesaw is the key to any woodshop. A well made and accurate crosscut sled increases the tablesaw’s usefullness many fold and can delay the purchase of a radial arm saw or miter saw (Mr. Marks uses his cross cut sled almost to the exclusion of those two saws).
Jointing is possible on the table saw as well as the router table.
A jig saw can delay but not eliminate the purchase of a band saw.
A planner is a must if you go beyond the rudimentary.
Good luck and welcome,
Kimball

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#15 posted 05-29-2009 11:08 PM

Hey Jen
Welcome to Ljs I’ll chime in with the table saw first but second I would recommend a chop saw.
Most importantly get some instruction on use of these tools before using them as a guy I know says”to read,understand.and follow the instructions of your tools’ and most important were saftey glasses.”
There are a great number of how too’s on you tube especially Charles Neil (a member here) that are free and very helpful for someone new to woodworking and woodworking tools. Even better sign up for a beginning wood working course if you can. Many collages have them nation wide. If in doubt always get help, There are lots of first class woodworkers right here ready to help.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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