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Delta/Rockwell 4'' planer or a jointer?

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Forum topic by chickenhelmet posted 05-29-2009 04:41 PM 11672 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chickenhelmet

99 posts in 2772 days


05-29-2009 04:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question planer jointer deltarockwell

I’m looking at an old Delta/Rockwell 4” planer on craiglist. That’s how it’s listed anyways. Looks like a jointer. Planer or jointer, I need them both.Any thoughts on weather or not this would be a good way to get in? Might this be a good unit to learn on? Also does this look like a “planer/jointer”? Here’s a link: http://denver.craigslist.org/tls/1194677980.html Thanks all!

-- Larry , Colorado www.coloradorecordcrates.com


13 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#1 posted 05-29-2009 05:38 PM

It Looks like an older joiner but it will do the job ,if its has a flat bed , runs and still adjust OK

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View 747DRVR's profile

747DRVR

199 posts in 2817 days


#2 posted 05-29-2009 06:27 PM

Unless you are only making small boxes I would pass on that jointer.A 6” is minimum for normal use.Also the longer the bed the better.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#3 posted 05-29-2009 06:27 PM

4” should be fine for edge jointing, but is pretty narrow for face planing…which is one of the key functions of a jointer. Many folks with 6” jointers wish they had an 8” (like me!)....I’m wondering if 4” will be too limiting. If price is the driving factor, I’d be inclined to find a good used 6” jointer or possibly look into the HF 6” jointer, which many claim to be fairly functional, and goes on sale in the $180-$200 range often.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#4 posted 05-29-2009 07:14 PM

Id hold off for at least a longer bed 6” jointer if I were you, although , if you need both jointer and planer – you might be better off getting the planer/thicknesser FIRST – roughly handplane 1 face of a board, then run it through the planer on both faces…. joint by hand one edge, then run the 2nd edge by table saw.

I got my 6” delta jointer (for $70) FIRST, and had to hand plane all my 2nd faces by hand which is a real pain sometimes when you want to speed things up.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View chickenhelmet's profile

chickenhelmet

99 posts in 2772 days


#5 posted 05-29-2009 10:38 PM

Thickness planer first? Maybe I should go that route. Seems to make sense. I’m just a sucker for niffty old stuff. Thanks everone! You too Jim. LOL

-- Larry , Colorado www.coloradorecordcrates.com

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 2828 days


#6 posted 05-29-2009 10:51 PM

chickenhelmet, 4’’ is a wee bit small. I’d opt for a 6” like this one listed in your nik of the woods $50 more…
http://denver.craigslist.org/tls/1179713027.html

View 747DRVR's profile

747DRVR

199 posts in 2817 days


#7 posted 05-30-2009 02:19 AM

That 6” is a much better buy.It should last you a long time,or at least till you decide you want an 8”

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1488 posts in 2813 days


#8 posted 05-30-2009 04:45 AM

That looks like a Delta Homecraft 4” Jointer from the ‘50’s maybe 60’s, Rockwell era, 37-290 I think. Should clean up nice if you’re willing to spend the time doing it. $50 to $75 would make it worth it. But as has been stated, your limited in the width of a board you can face. I’d consider buying it and restoring it for the price I mentioned but not to be my primary jointer.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Durnik150's profile

Durnik150

647 posts in 2782 days


#9 posted 05-30-2009 08:38 AM

While it looks like a decent price for what it is, what it can do is limited. It csn joint wood up to 4 inches wide meaning it can put a flat place on the wide part of a 4” noard. Usually this is only half the battle since you walso want to be able to thickness plane. I don’t foresee this equipment serving that need. I’m sure you could get a lot closer than most people could get with a hand plane and the surfave may be more comsistennt but it may leave you with a false sense of accuracy where there isn’t any.

For $100 you could save up another 125 or so and get a descent Delta jointer. About the same $225 or a little more will get you a Ridgid thickness planer. I know this just jumpred from $100 to $450 but buying old steel is a gamble and since some newer tech is no too much more ecpensive, it may be worth considering the long run payoff.
I personally would hold off unless you are willing for this machine to only be a jointer and nothing more. It’s a pretty decent price even being onlly a jointer.

Best of luck.

-- Behind the Bark is a lot of Heartwood----Charles, Centennial, CO

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Durnik150

647 posts in 2782 days


#10 posted 05-30-2009 09:16 AM

Sorry about typos. Getting tired

-- Behind the Bark is a lot of Heartwood----Charles, Centennial, CO

View chickenhelmet's profile

chickenhelmet

99 posts in 2772 days


#11 posted 05-30-2009 04:04 PM

Thanks everyone! I think I’ll pass here and save for the thickness planer first. It seems as if that’s the way to go. I think you are able to do both, planing and jointing, in some applications. I think I should get some good working machines and then get into the restoration. I do like to bring the life back out of an older machines. Kinda like older cars, there’s got to be a reason there still around. Thanks again!

-- Larry , Colorado www.coloradorecordcrates.com

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1488 posts in 2813 days


#12 posted 05-31-2009 08:43 PM

One of these 4” jointers popped up on craigslist here today, they’re asking $175.

Keep in mind a planer won’t flatten a board that has a curve to it, it will just make the board the same thickness all along the curve. That’s where the jointer comes in, it allows you to flatten one side of a curved board before planing it, then you’ll have a flat board.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View chickenhelmet's profile

chickenhelmet

99 posts in 2772 days


#13 posted 05-31-2009 09:29 PM

I’ll keep it mind now that I know it. Thaks Curt! Thanks so much for clearing that up before I buy any tools. I love this place!

-- Larry , Colorado www.coloradorecordcrates.com

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