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Forum topic by bhacksaw posted 03-03-2015 07:29 PM 479 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bhacksaw

161 posts in 1289 days


03-03-2015 07:29 PM

I’m planning on building a bar with a textured look seen in the accompanying picutre and need some advice.

Option 1: Rip and cross cut 2×4s to end up with blocks of wood in varying thickness and length (all pieces will be the same height as the 2×4, 1.5”). The thickness will be 1/2”, 1”, 1 1/2” or 2” and the length will be 6”, 12”, 18” or 24”. This method will involve me gluing the pieces randomly (not TRUELY randomly, I will try to avoid having same thickness blocks right next to each other) to a 4’x8’ sheet of plywood. What would be the best way to secure these pieces so I can continue assembly as the glue dries? I thought of using 2+” nails in a nail gun nailing into the face, and then using a Dremel to trim the nails that have come through on the backside when done. Or, as I go from left to right in a row, I could nail in at an angle into the end grain of the right side of each block as I go along. This way, I could use shorter nails.

Option 2: I could fake the look by cutting dados of differing widths and depths all in one 2×4. I think it would save a LOT of time, I just don’t know if it’s practical.

Very excited to get started on this, my first large-scale project.


6 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#1 posted 03-04-2015 12:27 AM

I think you are better off with using a 3/4” backing to nail the 2×4’s to. I would’t ever want to dust and clean that.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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AandCstyle

2572 posts in 1722 days


#2 posted 03-04-2015 01:00 AM

bhacksaw, if I understand the process correctly, why not toenail the top of each piece. Hold the nail gun 3/4” back from the backer and nail at a 45* angle with a 1.5” nail and and it won’t poke through the backer. Also, stay a couple inches from the ends to avoid splitting. FWIW

-- Art

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Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#3 posted 03-04-2015 01:11 AM

Back in the day, over forty years ago, I built walls in my shop like this. I fashioned them after a wall in a house I rented years prior. Because the walls were built in place and stationary, I didn’t need any plywood. (I used 2x’s I got from a truss company for firing the shop stove.)

I just shot a couple nails in each block to secure it to the previous layer. Two nails, with the glue, and this thing should need plywood for little else than alignment. If the ones extending out the least were about 3/4”, I would think 3/8” ply would be sufficient.

I was thinking of building a chest using this approach, but was going to miter the corners.

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bhacksaw

161 posts in 1289 days


#4 posted 03-04-2015 02:15 AM

Art, that’s what I was thinking of, but doing so on the side of each piece rather than the top. Your method makes more sense, thanks.

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bhacksaw

161 posts in 1289 days


#5 posted 03-04-2015 03:25 AM

Mrjinx, I’m making it for my sister-in-law, so good news is I don’t have to dust it! ;)

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#6 posted 03-04-2015 04:02 AM

bhacksaw, lol… maybe put a shiny finish on it so all she have to do is vacuum or dust it.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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