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Pattern routing -- what went wrong?

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Forum topic by Bret posted 1883 days ago 4763 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bret

162 posts in 2091 days


1883 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question oak

Okay, so I decided to try pattern routing the feet for my quilt racks today. The first one was going very well (apart from the fact that the pattern i’d clamped to the foot kept shifting slightly, but I managed to compensate for the most part), as can be seen in the photos below.

The good

Then I switched to the other side and it all came apart.

The bad

I was working from untrimmed, rectangular blocks and using the router table to get close to the template—what should I have done, and is there a right way to have done this so that my precious foot blank wouldn’t have splintered so badly?

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...


27 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15648 posts in 2815 days


#1 posted 1883 days ago

Hard to say for sure since your photos aren’t coming up, but from your description I’m guessing the problem is the word untrimmed.

When pattern routing, the blank should be trimmed with a bandsaw to the approximate shape so that you are not taking off too much material with the router. Trying to take out large chunks of material with a pattern bit will result in grabbing and tearout.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2585 days


#2 posted 1883 days ago

Try taking smaller passes and not all at once.

The piece could have also had a crack already.

Also pay attention to the direction your router bit rotates.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2245 days


#3 posted 1883 days ago

what He (Charlie) said. also good for your router bit as it’ll prolong it’s life as it doesnt subject it to heavy impacts, and make it take light passes, and obviously less material to pass by it’s blades.

compare that scenario with a jointer… now consider that you’d lower the infeed table to 2” below the cutterhead (theoretically).

you can argue that you’re taking light passes each time. but it only takes 1 bite of the bit to grab onto the wood deeper, and it’s too late.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2589 days


#4 posted 1883 days ago

i would also add insted of clamping your pattern or templet to the piece use good double sided tape to keep it from moving

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#5 posted 1883 days ago

All good approaches besides destroying your work its dangerous not to due what Gary,Charles,purp and doyou said

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TheCaver's profile

TheCaver

288 posts in 2436 days


#6 posted 1883 days ago

Definitely trim to within 1/16 or so of your line, but one thing which has not been mentioned is grain direction…..make sure you are routing downhill….sometimes that means switching bits from top to bottom bearing or vice versa…..

JC

-- Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known. -Carl Sagan

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 1990 days


#7 posted 1883 days ago

what Gary said is crucial, your router bit is rotating AGAINST the wood fibers.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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patron

12955 posts in 1937 days


#8 posted 1883 days ago

i see some bandsaw marks ? that is good to remove as much stock as possible leaving cut proud ( over ) by
1/16 to 1/8 then use router .
it also appears that you routed 1 side and then put pattern on other side to compleat ?
. a router bit spins in a clockwise direction when held by hand looking down ,
but upside down in the table it spins counterclock wise . if you clamped your pattern to the piece you could not get it close enough to the end because of the table . when you route curves ,youhave to watch for grain changes .
climb cutting is when you have to push the router into the work ( prefered) and downhill cutting , when the cutter wants to pull itsef along the work ( this is not good , unless under firm control ) .
the chip that broke was because the bit was climbing across the grain , and at the end it broke the wood with no support . 1, shape ends first and redimension to remove splinters
. 2. make multiple passes with bit a little at a time
. 3. clamp sacrifice board on sides for bit to follow , then remove
. 4 attach patern with nails / screws and fill holes later .
.
personaly i hate working with oak for these reasons and it also splinters in my hands , i hope i didn’t confuse to much , im getting tired and grogy . good luck and safe woodworking

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Bret's profile

Bret

162 posts in 2091 days


#9 posted 1883 days ago

Sounds like I’m going to have to get another bit—I’ve got a top-bearing 2” bit (the feet are 1 1/2” wide) and I guess my jigsaw could get me pretty close to the layout line since I don’t have a bandsaw yet.

I strongly believe that the chip that broke loose (but not completely detached) from the top can be glued back into place—is there a good way to get glue in there without further damage?

There really is a lot to remember—thanks all for not making me feel like a moron!

(I tried to figure out how to paste in the photos from Flickr but I couldn’t for the life of me get them to embed. And I’m a software engineer by day!)

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2585 days


#10 posted 1883 days ago

Just squeeze the glue in there. It doesn’t have to get all the way in just as much as you can. Then clamp it for a couple of hours.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Bret's profile

Bret

162 posts in 2091 days


#11 posted 1882 days ago

Okay. I repaired the damage and got some carpet tape at Home Depot to affix my template to the block. Took my jigsaw out and trimmed the foot close to the template. Re-routed the damaged side using a pattern bit instead of the flush trim bit I used on the other side. Worked like a charm.

Then I went to remove the template and realized that the carpet “tape” I had wasn’t tape at all—it was a thin layer of rubber cement-like substance with some fibers in it for structure. I got it all off the template, but does anyone have any ideas how to get it off the workpiece without damaging it? I thought about goo gone and other solvents but wasn’t sure whether they’d damage the wood. I tried using a putty knife to scrape it off and that didn’t work so well. I tried rubbing it off and that kind of worked, but I was concerned that I might be forcing something into the wood that would interfere with later finishing.

What would you all try to get this gook off? (I’ve ordered some proper double-stick tape from a woodworking supplier online and will be using it, not the carpet tape, in the future).

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

View patron's profile

patron

12955 posts in 1937 days


#12 posted 1882 days ago

try mineral spirits ( let it work for a bit ) then sanding ?
we learn patience in woodwoorking .
don’t teach the wood ,
let it teach you .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2350 days


#13 posted 1882 days ago

First I would try mineral spirits then denatured alcohol after that maybe acetone.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2123 days


#14 posted 1882 days ago

...and don’t forget to use your scraper, it’s the hand tool gem of the shop!

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2245 days


#15 posted 1882 days ago

usually most of it just peels off, and if any goo is left – a scraper will take care of that without damaging your piece (on the contrary – it’ll leave it glass smooth)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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