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WTB - Walker Turner 16" bandsaw trunnions

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Forum topic by ronkellison posted 03-03-2015 05:05 PM 969 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ronkellison

8 posts in 1265 days


03-03-2015 05:05 PM

I have acquired a 1940-41 bandsaw, Model # BN1135. Trunnions from the BN1105 will also work. The pot metal trunnions are all cracked or split and these things can’t be welded. A good friend referred to the metal as “melted down floor sweepings”!

Thanks for any assistance you may be able to offer!

Ron

-- You haven't really been lost until you've been lost at Mach 2!


11 replies so far

View bobkberg's profile

bobkberg

420 posts in 2538 days


#1 posted 03-08-2015 06:19 PM

Hi Ron,

When something is referred to as “pot metal” it’s usually cast aluminum or zinc, or an alloy of one of those.

Joe McDonald posted an interesting item here titled “Anyone have the lost old Powermatic motor cover blues?” where he says that he came up with a CAD drawing, and then had the cover made from that.

If you can turn the dimensions of the trunnions into a CAD drawing, you might be able to have a machine shop produce one for you. I have no idea what it might cost, but asking questions costs very little.

-- Bob www.singularengineering.com - A sideline, not how I earn a living

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 03-08-2015 07:02 PM

Post a WTB ad over in the BOYD section of owwm.org.. lots of vintage walker turner owners over there and I’m sure you will find what you are looking for.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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ronkellison

8 posts in 1265 days


#3 posted 03-08-2015 07:53 PM

Bob; I think the trunnions may be cast aluminum, although it puzzles me as to why the rest of the machine is such nice cast iron and they picked a weak metal for the one area that gets a lot of stress. I’ve got a line (lines) on various replacement pieces but nothing has come together yet.

Brad; I have posted on the BOYD forum and had a few replies but nothing has really come together yet. Considering that the saw is currently in pieces in the shop and my wife has insisted that we replace about 150 feet of baseboard and roughly the same amount of door casings I suspect it will be awhile before I actually get to the job of removing rust, etc.

-- You haven't really been lost until you've been lost at Mach 2!

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bobkberg

420 posts in 2538 days


#4 posted 03-11-2015 02:48 AM

Hi Ron,

Thanks for the update! I didn’t see the picture the first time I looked at your post. Have you tested the trunnions with a magnet to verify that they’re not iron or steel? Also, given the age of the machine, is it possible that someone else swapped out the originals for some reason?

The amount of rust there makes me wonder if it was exposed to any corrosive environments that could have affected anything.

All speculation, and possibly worth every penny you paid for it!

Regards,

-- Bob www.singularengineering.com - A sideline, not how I earn a living

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ronkellison

8 posts in 1265 days


#5 posted 03-11-2015 01:02 PM

Bob, the trunnions are the notorious weak point of these bandsaws. I’ve read through most of the restoration threads available on various forums and it’s quite common to find that they are cracked or completely broken. Whatever the “metal” is made from, it is not a ferrous material because the magnet just falls off.

With respect to the rust, the only area I’ve found that has actually rusted is at the bottom of the base. The brown color on the rest of the saw seems to be a combination of age and dust. It comes off easily with a wire brush and I usually find faded paint underneath. It should clean up relatively easily with a pressure washer, wire brush and some solvent for the stubborn bits.

Thanks for the reply!

Ron

-- You haven't really been lost until you've been lost at Mach 2!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#6 posted 03-11-2015 01:19 PM

I have to ask, if it’s very common that those parts are cracked what are the odds of finding good used that won’t eventually crack? It would be interesting to see if you could make molds and recast what you have in iron.

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 915 days


#7 posted 03-11-2015 03:08 PM

You’ll probably need to make a wood mold (including a core), cast the parts out of aluminum, and make friends with someone who has a mill and lathe. I’m not exactly sure how the radius would be cut on the trunnion.

-- Nicholas

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ronkellison

8 posts in 1265 days


#8 posted 03-11-2015 03:57 PM

According to my local contacts there is a very skilled artisan here in Eastern Ontario who would cast the pieces for me in bronze. I haven’t pursued that route yet but it’s certainly an option.

Thanks for the replies!

Ron

-- You haven't really been lost until you've been lost at Mach 2!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#9 posted 03-11-2015 07:02 PM

I hate to say I would live with it, but I have never needed to tilt a table on a band saw. If you think of how you use it cracked trunnions may not present any issues. If they really are aluminum then someone with tungston gas and a spool gun on a welder should be able to fuse it back together. Or you could try this product:

http://www.amazon.com/BAC-Industries-AP-201-Alumi-Pro-Welding/dp/B0001YWCE2

View ronkellison's profile

ronkellison

8 posts in 1265 days


#10 posted 03-12-2015 02:53 AM

I, too, will probably live with what I have provided I can get the table set at a perfect 90° to the blade. I’m confident that will satisfy 95% (or more) of my needs. It gives me a bit of time to continue searching before I make any decision regarding casting replacement parts. I really would prefer to keep it “original” but that may not be an option.

-- You haven't really been lost until you've been lost at Mach 2!

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#11 posted 03-12-2015 05:01 PM

Just a wild thought here, I did a quick search and quite a few new saws come with cast iron trunnions.
the cost of machining new trunnions would be rather high, it might be possible to buy a new set of trunnions
as parts and adapt them to your machine. If there are any woodworking showrooms or possibly bandsaws
of friends you could check to see if any might be close to the correct size and easy to adapt.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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