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Forum topic by devann posted 03-03-2015 03:23 PM 1461 views 4 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


03-03-2015 03:23 PM

Below are pictures of some jigs I’ve made & used over the years. Has I post new ones I’ll provide a description of what each one is made to do & how it works. I have a boxes full jigs and fixtures because many of my carpentry & woodworking task require repetitive actions. I read through over half of the forum pages about jigs & fixtures available on this site. I’ll try to post jigs & fixtures I’ve made that are different and unique and stay away from ones that are already so numerous that it seems pointless to just post more of them on the site.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with


13 replies so far

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patron

13538 posts in 2808 days


#1 posted 03-03-2015 03:33 PM

where are the pictures ?
or is it just my puter

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#2 posted 03-03-2015 03:34 PM

This is a saw jig that I use to make radius cuts on the ends of beams. It can be used on 4x, 6x, etc… I make the cuts pretty much like you make cove cuts on the tables saw. I start very shallow dragging the saw across the end of the beam incrementally increasing the depth of the cut until desired depth has been reached. The final pass is made very slowly to achieve a smoother cut. The miter pictured is 22.5°. The radius of the cut is limited to the size sawblade used. This saw pictured has a 7.25” blade.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#3 posted 03-03-2015 03:35 PM

sorry David, It took me a minute to write and post pics.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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patron

13538 posts in 2808 days


#4 posted 03-03-2015 04:23 PM

very nice look darrel

they do allot of corbel cuts around here
to go with the southwestern adobe look
but mostly with the bandsaw
which of course cant be done well
with long timbers

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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helluvawreck

23199 posts in 2333 days


#5 posted 03-03-2015 04:32 PM

That looks really nice.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#6 posted 03-03-2015 04:44 PM

Thanks David.

Yes bandsaws work well on the shorter corbels. I’ve seen other carpenters try to make similar cuts on the ends of beams with reciprocating saws, but the cuts are usually out of square, especially on thicker beams. This method does make a cleaner, crisper cut.

Thank you, Charles.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#7 posted 03-04-2015 12:46 AM

Another big wood jig/fixture. I call this one the ”aircraft carrier”. It is what it resembles. It is made for use with a 16” beam saw. I know there probably are not a lot of fellow LJs that use large beam saws, but there are now more than 100,000 of us on the site. With spring/summer approaching here in the Northern Hemisphere I think that there will be quite a few people starting to think about future plans.
The fixture is for safely cutting 45° miters on the end of 6×6 post with a 16” beam saw. The pictures should pretty much make building one and use self explanatory for a typical carpenter/woodworker.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#8 posted 03-04-2015 01:22 AM

That first jig is way cool. You are the only guy I ever saw sculpting with a Skilsaw!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#9 posted 03-04-2015 02:05 AM

Thanks for sharing this. It’s unlikely I’ll ever work with beams like that but that’s one of the more novel jigs I’ve seen.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#10 posted 03-04-2015 05:28 PM

Thanks Andy, JAAune. I do love the model 77 Skilsaw, It’s is my favorite circular saw. I have been know to use it like a power planer for a quick planning job when I didn’t want to or didn’t have the proper planer with me.

FYI, on the 2×6s pictured above, to cut the radius I used a “jigsaw” that Porter cable sells calling it a bayonet saw. It has a wide fixed base. I’ve had better luck with it vs. other jigsaws making clean cuts without the “walking”out of square cut experienced with some saws cutting a radius.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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vonhagen

528 posts in 1831 days


#11 posted 03-05-2015 08:04 AM

now that is some old school millwork!!! great job devann.

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

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Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#12 posted 03-10-2015 05:42 PM

That’s really cool. How many passes would you say you make to get a corbel cut? Can you get much more than 1/8” per pass?

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devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#13 posted 03-11-2015 03:41 AM

Thank you Blaine. old school sometimes is the only way I know. But I never turn down a better way. That’s what makes this site such good place to visit. More ideas are a good thing.

Thanks Tim, How many passes? I don’t know, a lot. An 1/8” per pass sounds about right. If you get greedy and try to go deeper you run the risk of kickback, or kickup in this case. Ether way you’ll ruin the piece if it happens. Slow, linear pressure and steady speed across the grain are required. For the last pass I slow down the speed dragging the saw across the grain. This gives more cuts per inch making a smother cut.

I realize that it is hard to see in the picture of the first jig. I installed a piece of 90° wall angle, (the stuff you see around the room edge of an acoustic drop ceiling) on the jig for the Skilsaw table to ride on. I did this for wear reasons.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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