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Dog hole jig?

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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 03-02-2015 02:28 AM 1302 views 1 time favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

219 posts in 796 days


03-02-2015 02:28 AM

So all I have is a 20v hand drill and I need to make some dog holes in my 2 1/2 inch top.

What jigs or guides did you all use? Where can I get it or what are the details to build my own?

Also what bit would you suggest?

-- Colorado Springs, CO


34 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1642 posts in 1779 days


#1 posted 03-02-2015 03:24 AM

The cheapest route would be a hard block of 2” thick maple for the guide block and a cheap, conventional twist drill modified to a brad point. I use lots of maple for drilling jigs that only need to last for a few hundred holes.

Glue the maple to a strip of plywood then drill two 3/4” holes on a drill press if you can get access to one. One goes into the maple and the second goes through the plywood at the proper spacing away from the first hole. That’s used in conjunction with a dowel for spacing the holes evenly.

Modifying the drill bit is trickier and unfortunately, I can’t describe that process in writing. It requires a standard bench grinder to do and could be time-consuming with a 3/4” bit. After modifying the bit, the flutes are dulled to minimize the chance of damage to the drilling jig.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#2 posted 03-02-2015 03:31 AM

What he said and maybe clamping a sacrificial piece at the bottom of your bench below the hole to prevent blow out.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Mykos

102 posts in 1257 days


#3 posted 03-02-2015 03:43 AM

I took a 3×5x2” block of wood and scribed the center lines all around all the sides. Then I drilled a 3/4” hole through it with a router clamped down to ensure it was square to the faces. If you have access to a drill press, or know anyone who could do that part for you then it’d be ideal.

I could then mark out the lines for where I wanted dog holes on the bench top, align the block with the lines and clamp it down.

I used a brace and 3/4” bit, so that isn’t any help to you but the jig worked just fine to keep me plumb.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2694 days


#4 posted 03-02-2015 04:06 AM

How about making a jig similar to this. Follow JAAune’s advice and drill a row at a time.
I was bored so I thought I would whip this out. I saw something like this where a router was used…sorta like drilling shelf pin holes. You could do the same with a larger hole for the guide bushing to fit.


Hope this helps.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1008 days


#5 posted 03-02-2015 04:33 PM

You could always try this too.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=72602&cat=51&ap=1

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#6 posted 03-02-2015 07:30 PM

I see no need to worry about exact placement of the holes like you would for shelf pins. The issue is drilling holes that are perpendicular to the bench. A thick board with a v-notch cut in the end will do the job just fine. Or a thick board with a hole made in a drill press if you have access to one.
A degree or two out of square is not going to affect either bench dogs or holdfasts.
Check out http://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/?p=309

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2694 days


#7 posted 03-02-2015 07:35 PM

“I see no need to worry about exact placement of the holes like you would for shelf pins.”

Yeah, but it makes ‘em look purty! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

219 posts in 796 days


#8 posted 03-02-2015 07:40 PM

Thank you all for the help in this.

-- Colorado Springs, CO

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1914 posts in 1218 days


#9 posted 03-02-2015 07:49 PM

While I haven’t done it myself, I understand that a lot of people use a plunge router for dog holes. Do you have a plunge router?

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View Splinter12's profile

Splinter12

55 posts in 1578 days


#10 posted 03-02-2015 08:16 PM

I did that not to long ago,

http://lumberjocks.com/Splinter12/blog/39641

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

219 posts in 796 days


#11 posted 03-02-2015 08:34 PM

I do not have a plunge router

-- Colorado Springs, CO

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1642 posts in 1779 days


#12 posted 03-03-2015 12:23 AM

Exact placement isn’t necessary but I find it’s good to be precise. Sooner or later, you’ll probably get the bright idea to build a jig that fits into the holes and if the spacing is off, that won’t work.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1950 days


#13 posted 03-03-2015 12:48 AM

A piece of pipe mounted on a pipe flange will give you holes straight enough to call them perpendicular.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1038 days


#14 posted 03-03-2015 12:56 AM

After you are about 1” down in the bench you won’t need the jig,the bench will hold the drill straight.

View Mykos's profile

Mykos

102 posts in 1257 days


#15 posted 03-03-2015 02:51 AM

That is true. However starting the drill plumb for that first inch is crucial. If you’re a few degrees off then once you’re an inch down you’re pooched. Hence his request for a jig.

I’m pretty good about drilling plumb with a brace unassisted. I made a jig for the bench dog job because there are so many holes and having them on a bit of an angle will make it so a holdfast won’t grip as strong in the direction the hole is canted toward. Not to mention like JAAune said, if you want to make something that drops into two or more dog holes (like a planing stop or batten) then if they aren’t all in the same vertical plane it won’t work to be interchangable.

If you were in the same country I’d just mail you my block of wood. Heck, if you want to pay international shipping for a block of wood with a hole in it, it’s yours. Probably there’s someone in your state with a drill press or a router that can hook you up though.

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