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using a pin nailer on hard maple?

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Forum topic by marc_rosen posted 03-02-2015 01:17 AM 842 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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marc_rosen

80 posts in 2648 days


03-02-2015 01:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question attaching hardwoods

Hello Gang,
(First, I plan to experiment on several pieces of scrap once I drag my compressor into my basement shop.)
I am redoing our kitchen and to match my refrigerator I’m replacing the pine T&G boards on my closet and other areas with some mildly (curly) figured hard maple. Most of these board are attached to the framing lumber with #6 screws but I need to affix the floor and ceiling mouldings and the corner trim mouldings with something less visible. (the screw heads will be covered by the aforementioned mouldings). My first thought was to drill clearance holes for finish nails but before I do that I wanted to know if any of you have experience using pin nailers to attach maple.
The boards are 3/4 inch think and I’ll probably machine the mouldings to be 1/2, except the outside corner pieces will closer to 1 inch on their widest dimension.
Again, I will experiment before I trash my finished pieces but I’d like to hear what some of you have done.
Thanks in advance for your comments. Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"


5 replies so far

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Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2489 days


#1 posted 03-02-2015 01:48 AM

I have had a Cadex CPB23.50 23 gauge pinner for several years now. I have used it very effectively on hard maple. The bigger issue than the wood species might be the size of the moldings. I most frequently use the 23 gauge pinner on small decorative moldings but for base boards, door trim, and crown molding I am more likely to reach for the 18 gauge brad nailer.

The 23 gauge pins are so small that you don’t need to fill holes at all while 18 gauge brads might need a spot of filler

-- Greg, Severn MD

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marc_rosen

80 posts in 2648 days


#2 posted 03-02-2015 03:04 AM

Hi Greg,
Thanks very much for this reply. I’m hopeful to test this out next weekend and if I need to I’ll look into getting a brad naileras well.
How was your weather down in Severn today? We’re icing up a little here just below Pennsylvania. Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

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JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#3 posted 03-02-2015 03:17 AM

Oak is actually a tougher wood to drive pins into. Sometimes those thin pins divert from the original path and follow the softer pores instead of going in straight. Despite that, I’ve had success with every species I’ve pinned.

The downside to pins is that without heads, they are terrible for pulling moldings straight. If you’re dealing with larger moldings that have a bow, it may be necessary to step up to brads to pull the joint tight.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 03-02-2015 04:37 AM

I use 15 through the jamb and 18 into the wall. I’ve occasionally had issue with oak and maple but only when I wasn’t paying attention to the grain.

-- I meant to do that!

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Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2489 days


#5 posted 03-02-2015 10:49 AM

Marc – we got a fair bit of ice down here. The others brought up a good point that I forgot. The smaller the gauge, the greater the chance of deflection… maintaining orientation to the grain certainly helps reduce that. But make sure that you keep your fingers well clear of the area being pinned because some can curl and come out in unexpected places.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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