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Forum topic by SCOTSMAN posted 05-24-2009 11:51 PM 1213 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3050 days


05-24-2009 11:51 PM

Friday I got a terrible shock I was busilly sanding some wood on an industrial sander which I own a belt disc type, when I got the big whammy.Full 440 volts right through me fortunately I was a bit shaken not but not too stirred. I didn’t do anymore work that day. I don’t have proper three phase but have a collection of newish convertors and one of them feeding the sander had a loose wire I fixed it today so am still with you tday.I got a fright though to tell the truth and hope it never happens again keep well my brothers and sisters kindest regards Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease


15 replies so far

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lew

11340 posts in 3220 days


#1 posted 05-25-2009 12:00 AM

Alistair,

I wonder if they make a GFI receptacle for 3 phase. If they are available it may be worth the money.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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patron

13538 posts in 2806 days


#2 posted 05-25-2009 12:07 AM

well thank God you are still with us .
i finaly had to learn about electricity ,
for just that reason too .
now i do it myself and know what to look for .
thanks for the heads up .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Allison

819 posts in 3264 days


#3 posted 05-25-2009 01:06 AM

Any shop accident is down right scary. I am so thankful you are okay!

-- Allison, Northeastern Ca. Remember, Amateurs built the Ark. Professionals built the Titanic!

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Rustic

3220 posts in 3061 days


#4 posted 05-25-2009 01:06 AM

Glad you are still with us 44 could have killed you

-- www.carvingandturningsbyrick.com, Rick Kruse, Grand Rapids, MI

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3765 days


#5 posted 05-25-2009 03:25 PM

You were lucky Alistair.

It reminded me about electrical shock. They say that the amperage, not the volts that kill.

So I looked it up. This gives a good explanation of it.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#6 posted 05-25-2009 11:48 PM

Wow Alistair I’m sure glad your alright .thank goodness.
Hey DaveR thanks for the saftey tips.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View kiwi1969's profile

kiwi1969

609 posts in 2907 days


#7 posted 05-26-2009 12:03 AM

Been there twice. It kinda make a tickle doesn,t it! Glad my Stanleys don,t have plugs.

-- if the hand is not working it is not a pure hand

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3765 days


#8 posted 05-26-2009 12:56 AM

I’d also like to thank DaveR, for some expert advice.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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Karson

35035 posts in 3866 days


#9 posted 05-26-2009 01:02 AM

Glad to hear you are OK. I’ve only played with 220. Had a couple of screwdrivers melted but no physical shock. My max has been 120.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#10 posted 05-26-2009 04:24 AM

Glad to hear you’re still posting Alistair.

The ground on your equipment is the most important conductopr of all!! It is the brakes for electrical circuits; it is there to trip the breaker when there is a fault. You wouldn’t drive a car without brakes, would you? Do not operate electrical equipment without a ground!

lew, they make GFCI equipmet for just about any thing you want to protect any more. It is required on all services over 1200 AMPS.

DaveR, the ground DOES NOT replace the neutral conductor. The neutral is a current carrying circuit conductor. The ground only carries ground fault current to trip the circuit over current device. Using it for any other purpose is not a safe practice. If the neutral is compromised or open, the tool should not work. It is the same if the hot conductor(s) is open, the tool doesn’t work. The only tools not required to have a ground are double insulated.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#11 posted 05-26-2009 07:35 AM

Sorry, I didn’t mean to “put words in your mouth”. I just reread what you said about the neutral, it is technically correct; however, probably a bit beyond the comprehension of the novice reader.

I suppose you can make a case for some leakage always being present, but not for the purposes of this forum. A personal protection ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) trips in the range of .005(+/-) amp within .025 seconds, which is before the second cycle is completed after the detection. Less than .003 amp is, for all practical purposes, not an electrical current unless you are dealing with sophisticated electronics. Even equipment protection GFCIs found on small circuits trip at .030 amp.

What the novice needs to know is the ground is the most important safety feature of their electrical system. They can check it to a known ground with a continuity tester or meter. The worst possible electrical shock is from one hand to the other across the heart. Anyone over about 50 that that gets an electrical shock should spend the next 24 hours in a hospital for observation. The heart can go into ventricular fibrillation which is a condition of uncoordinated beats during that period. Younger people usually do not have this risk beyond a couple of hours.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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scrappy

3506 posts in 2896 days


#12 posted 05-26-2009 08:54 AM

Bad scare but thank god your still with us.

Be safe everyone!

Scrappy

-- Scrap Wood's the best...the projects are smaller, and so is the mess!

View Brian024's profile

Brian024

358 posts in 2865 days


#13 posted 05-26-2009 10:29 PM

As a student electrician let me say, thank god you were not hurt. There have been a couple guys in my class that have gotten shocked by 120 and even 208, but were not hurt. As Dick and Dave pointed out it is not volts that kills but amps, volts are still dangerous though. The analogy my teacher uses to explain electricity is water in a pipe. Voltage is the pressure, Amps is the water flowing in the pipe, and Resistance is the force opposing the water. Ohm’s law basically. I always work 1 handed when working with anything electrical, it keeps it from flowing through the heart. I also always have my voltage detector nearby, I say its the best $14 I ever spent.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3765 days


#14 posted 05-26-2009 11:02 PM

One handed approach is good advice.

I learned that in electronics class over 60 years ago.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#15 posted 05-27-2009 09:38 AM

Having worked a lot of “hot work” in the last 40 years, there are times when you need both hands; keep them together ;-)) Another thing to keep in mind is the power of any shock will over power the millivolts that operate your nervous system. The reason electricity is said to hold you is because it overcomes the nervous system and contracts your muscles. If the shock is to the back of the hand, the contracting muscles pull you away; conversely, if to the center of the hand, it closes and you stay there until someone cuts the power. I have only seen that happen once. An electrician I was working with was using a properly grounded tool. A tin bender had an ungrounded defective tool. When the tin bender touched the metal building which was supported above grade on a concrete foundation, the whole building became hot! We didn’t know what the problem was when Steve got hung up. We drove a ground rod to ground the building, it wasn’t long before we found out.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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