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Help, leaky shed

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Forum topic by Broda posted 05-23-2009 02:18 AM 3827 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Broda

313 posts in 2984 days


05-23-2009 02:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shed water question

hey everyone,
my new shed has just been built.

PROBLEM
it leaks…
the main problem is water pooling up at the doors and going in through the cracks that i cant silicone (because then the doors wouldn’t open)

has anybody got any ideas on how to divert the water away from the doors? (second image)

thanks in advance

PS. i hope the photos worked

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-


20 replies so far

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Broda

313 posts in 2984 days


#1 posted 05-23-2009 02:20 AM

bugger, looks like they didn’t

how do you attach the photos into the post?

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 3033 days


#2 posted 05-23-2009 02:39 AM

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Broda

313 posts in 2984 days


#3 posted 05-23-2009 03:45 AM

shed door

thanks derek,

the water pools up around the door when its closed and gets into the shed, but then it cant go back out.

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3177 days


#4 posted 05-23-2009 06:10 AM

Could you place some weather stripping on the outside of the door to divert the water away from the track so it doesn’t collect there? Perhaps drilling some holes on the outside edge of the track would let the water out so it would not accumulate and overflow inside.

I had a similar problem on an garden shed back in Winnipeg. Water (and then ice) would actually jamb the door so I had to melt the ice out before I could open the door (actually had to break the door so I could get in to melt the ice).
Try to divert the water first to reduce the amount you have to get rid of then figure out how to drain the water out of the track to the outside so it doesn’t flow inside.

HTH.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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kimball

323 posts in 2762 days


#5 posted 05-23-2009 06:15 PM

Hey Brody,
It looks like you have a floor there. If so and it has some sort of stiffening system (pressure treated 2x’s),
empty out the shed. Jack it up and make a loose cinder block foundation. You may have to move the shed off of the floor in order to get cinder blocks under center of floor to prevent sagging.

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Broda

313 posts in 2984 days


#6 posted 05-26-2009 08:31 AM

Mark Shymanski- thanks ill try some of that

kimball-no floor, just the concrete underneath
but i could put a small risen floor in there
thanks

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

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kimball

323 posts in 2762 days


#7 posted 05-28-2009 04:47 PM

A floor made with plywood over pressure treated 2x’s on top of the cement should do the trick. The whole floor can be held in place with “tapcon’s” or what ever goes for concrete screws in your neighborhood.
Good luck, Kimball

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Elaine

113 posts in 3088 days


#8 posted 05-28-2009 11:43 PM

Water obeys the gravity command. My two cents worth -raise the building so the doors are above the slope of the concrete in front of them with 4×6 treated. (use a 4’ level on a straight 8 -10’ timber or a string level). Run the front 4×6 parallel with the opening so it acts as a block. You then can seal the space between the treated lumber and the concrete. I’d put the 6” so it is flat against the concrete with 4” height. This way it will give you more room to square the building. I’d finish up with the floor as kimball suggested A sloped timber in front and you can still get anything in without damaging the door frame. The other penny -you can always cut into the concrete in front of the door and put in a drain of some sort, maybe french or use the metal grid like they do at factories to divert the water away (had to do this with my driveway). Make sure if you use the drain method to slope away from any other structures. Oh and I would put some type of sealant on the concrete and the wood. It will make them last longer.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3113 days


#9 posted 05-29-2009 12:31 AM

try coming up with some “sub roof” or some material with a slope right under the roof line which will divert the water further away from the shed, so that it will not accumulate at the door area, then tunnel the water away by digging the ground to form tunnels, or building sand mounds.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Broda's profile

Broda

313 posts in 2984 days


#10 posted 05-29-2009 01:37 PM

Thanks for your replies everybody
there is a bit to think about there

if i did make some sort of raised floor inside the shed, would it the too unstable and make my lathe shake when turning?

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

View kimball's profile

kimball

323 posts in 2762 days


#11 posted 05-29-2009 10:27 PM

Since it appears that you will be working in the shed as opposed to just storage, I would make a raised floor with joists and rim joists much like a real floor. I should be bigger than the shed and anchored to the concrete. The alternative is raising the level of your concrete slab by pouring and leveling more cement.
Again, good luck,
Kimball

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3113 days


#12 posted 05-29-2009 10:54 PM

I would suggest trying to get the water away from the shed then raising the floor – although raising the floor is a good idea, and you should do it anyways is you can – if you do not get the water away from the shed, it’ll still leak inside- and accumulate under your new floor – humidity, and other problems might occur from that. and with a floor already installed -you won’t be able to see it , nor deal with it in an easy manner.

try to get the water away from the shed… then build a floor for added security and peace of mind.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Elaine's profile

Elaine

113 posts in 3088 days


#13 posted 06-01-2009 06:37 PM

Broda,

How big is your lathe? I have no problems with a floor on 16” centers. My entire shop is on cinderblock. I’ve had no problem with weight or vibration from any of my tools. (and no they are not all hand tools :) ) None of us asked how big your building is, that might change some of the answers.

View Vjeko's profile

Vjeko

135 posts in 2879 days


#14 posted 06-04-2009 02:32 PM

Your floor needs to be above water level otherwise no hope.
If that is the case, your entry needs to be a little higher than the outside and sloping
towards the outside and in addition add a (not sure what you call it) a weather strip
at the bottom of the door to stop rain directly coming in. Of course, ideally
the entry should be covered so you have least chance of any rain/water coming in
(I would start with this step as it has the greatest effect on your problem).

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

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ellen35

2724 posts in 2897 days


#15 posted 06-04-2009 03:05 PM

I put a small sunroom on my house a few years back. When I was doing the platform, I was told that it had to be exactly the dimensions of the outside of the structure or water that ran off the structure would puddle on any lip exposed beyond the perimeter and the whole thing would leak. I suspect that is your problem. To me, the simplest way to “fix” this is to put the shed on a platform that exactly conforms to the perimeter. Of course, caulking is a must too.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

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