LumberJocks

What's the difference between finger joints and box joints?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by utwoodhacker posted 02-27-2015 04:33 PM 1083 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View utwoodhacker's profile

utwoodhacker

6 posts in 651 days


02-27-2015 04:33 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finger joint box joint joints question router joining

I’ve had discussions with a buddy of mine about this topic. He says that these two joints are one in the same. He’s more experienced than I am, but I don’t think he’s correct on this topic. I see both sides mentioned all over the internet. Someone took the liberty of posting on wikipedia that they are the same.

Am I right or am I wrong on this one? BTW, it really doesn’t matter to me if I’m wrong. It’s just that I don’t think I am and well, you know how a debate can go with a buddy that always thinks he’s right.

-- UTWoodHacker, Utah


18 replies so far

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1571 days


#1 posted 02-27-2015 05:05 PM

I’ve always used them identically.

What do you think is the difference between them?

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#2 posted 02-27-2015 05:05 PM

/Users/tawana/Downloads/vertfingjnt.jpg
This is what I call a finger joint.
/Users/tawana/Downloads/WoodJointsTT8.jpg
And this is what I call a box joint.
I have heard people refer to the latter as a finger joint but never the other way around.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2434 days


#3 posted 02-27-2015 05:07 PM

Well, can’t get this MAC to post images, but the following post shows what I was trying to show.
Finger joints are to splice boards and box joints make corners.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#4 posted 02-27-2015 05:08 PM

A lot of people use the terms interchangeably to refer to the corner joint. Personally, I call those corners a box joint and use finger joint to refer to the similar technique used to scarf two pieces together to form a longer piece, like this:

Don’t know if the way I use the terms is correct, but it at least keeps the different techniques and applications separate in my head.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View jakep_82's profile

jakep_82

105 posts in 1769 days


#5 posted 02-27-2015 05:09 PM

My take on it is that all box joints are finger joints, but not all finger joints are box joints.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1571 days


#6 posted 02-27-2015 05:11 PM


My take on it is that all box joints are finger joints, but not all finger joints are box joints.

- jakep_82

Whether or not this is dictionary-definition true, I really like this answer.

Edit: perhaps I have been wrong all this time; I never really thought about using the term finger joints for end-to-end scarfing, but it makes sense.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#7 posted 02-27-2015 05:28 PM

My take on it is that all box joints are finger joints, but not all finger joints are box joints.

- jakep_82

Whether or not this is dictionary-definition true, I really like this answer.

- ADHDan

Makes sense to me, too. A finger joint would be any joint that uses “fingers” of wood interlaced to make a connection, while a box joint is a specific application of a finger joint used to make a corner.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#8 posted 02-27-2015 05:47 PM

To me, finger joints are small and box joints are bigger than the small ones :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#9 posted 02-27-2015 06:04 PM

In my experience finger joints are used to put together wood in length and usually cut with tapered fingers. Finger jointed moldings is one example. You must paint it. Box joints are used to put together pieces of wood that will join at an angle i.e. a box.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1015 posts in 1392 days


#10 posted 02-28-2015 12:45 AM

SirIrb: “You must paint it.”

Why?

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View splatman's profile

splatman

558 posts in 862 days


#11 posted 02-28-2015 01:38 AM

Yeah, aren’t there some people that like that finger-jointy look?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#12 posted 02-28-2015 01:59 AM

My understanding is the same as Jay T’s. But I do see the terms used interchangably.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2572 days


#13 posted 02-28-2015 02:00 AM

You must paint it in the sense that stain grade wood is seldom used for a finger joint.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View utwoodhacker's profile

utwoodhacker

6 posts in 651 days


#14 posted 03-02-2015 05:03 PM



My take on it is that all box joints are finger joints, but not all finger joints are box joints.

- jakep82

My take on it is that all box joints are finger joints, but not all finger joints are box joints.

- jakep82

Whether or not this is dictionary-definition true, I really like this answer.

- ADHDan

Makes sense to me, too. A finger joint would be any joint that uses “fingers” of wood interlaced to make a connection, while a box joint is a specific application of a finger joint used to make a corner.

- JayT

I think these really make a lot of sense. So, going back to my original post, I guess you can say that my buddy and I are both right, but it depends on the specific application. Thanks for all of the input.

-- UTWoodHacker, Utah

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#15 posted 03-02-2015 06:32 PM

If you buy finger jointed molding specifically it is sold as “Paint Grade” because it looks like crap if you just clear it. It is made from the dregs and cutoffs in at the molder. You get a bunch of 12” pieces glued together and molded. So specifically molding, yes, paint grade.


SirIrb: “You must paint it.”

Why?

- Picklehead


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com