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I need help on safe table saw ripping

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Forum topic by CTW posted 02-27-2015 05:28 AM 2272 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CTW

48 posts in 775 days


02-27-2015 05:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I am using a cabinet SawStop and yesterday I tried ripping a longer board for the first time. It was approximately 51”-52” long and as I am 5’4” the board was nearly as long as I am tall. I needed to rip two pieces off the board that were approximately 3” wide. I brought the fence over to the right distance and placed a magswitch feather board just to side a short distance back from the blade. The featherboard is the small one, about 7×4”. I stood a little to the left so I could reach the power paddle with my knee and I used my left hand to hold the board against the fence and fed the board with my right hand (followed by a push stick). A few inches in into the first cut I noticed that the board was tipping up off the table at the blade. This was before reaching the anti-kickback pawls. I quickly lifted the board with my right hand and made sure it was level on the table. I felt like I was extremely lucky that nothing happened. So when I started the second cut I tried to make sure I did it right, but sure enough I saw the board come up again – just not quite so high and this was when I was very aware and trying not to let this happen.

So before I try this again I need some guidance.
- Could this be a depth perception issue? (I don’t have great depth perception, but I can still parallel park).
- Are there safe hold-downs I could put on my fence to keep me from raising the board?
- Is this simply bad beginners luck and I will somehow learn what to do before I have a wreck?
- Could the featherboard have too tight against the board?

Hopefully somebody can help me figure this out.


41 replies so far

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MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 02-27-2015 05:43 AM

Put a featherboard on your fence to keep it from lifting.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Roller stands also help keep things level when using long stock.. both on the infeed and outfeed sides.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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CTW

48 posts in 775 days


#2 posted 02-27-2015 05:51 AM

Thank you Brad. After I posted I found the vertical featherboard by magswitch and I think it may be worth it to purchase. The alternative is not pleasant.

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jtm

218 posts in 1102 days


#3 posted 02-27-2015 07:06 AM

Is it possible the lumber wasn’t totally flat?

If there was a bow in it and you were feeding it with the bow side on the bottom, then the board will end up rocking. This may be why the board was coming up on you.

Obviously, this is not something you want.

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CTW

48 posts in 775 days


#4 posted 02-27-2015 07:58 AM

I believe it was flat, but I didn’t specifically check. Now I will be more aware. Thanks.

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2070 days


#5 posted 02-27-2015 08:56 AM

Don’t feel bad, this is a pretty common problem. When dealing with a lot of board sticking out in front of the blade its is easy to get it starting to ride up. Before the section your hand is on gets to the table you should forgo the push stick to use both hands. Make sure one hand is holding the board steady and the other is holding it down to the table so it doesn’t ride up. Once the part of the board you are holding reaches the table, switch to the push stick if the board is narrow enough to need it. That’s going to be if there is less room between the blade and the fence then your hand spread wide.

I would say that you are standing on the wrong side of the board. It sounds like you are standing where the off cuts are going. You should be on the side of the fence that doesn’t have wood next to it. If you can move your on/off switch over then great. If not, its more important not to be in line of wood that is next to a moving blade.

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albachippie

758 posts in 2501 days


#6 posted 02-27-2015 09:19 AM

I pic of your setup would be helpful. Does sound like a twisted board to me though. As you cut sawn timber, or any timber for that matter, the grains you are cutting through change the dynamic of the board, sometimes quite dramatically. It does help to flatten the board first so you know it is flat against the table top.

Sounds like you did everything correctly and safely. Sometimes just being aware of what the timber is doing and compensating for it is all you can do. If it wants to move it will, no matter what we do. I believe in featherboards and safety devices, but, if you have a feather board that is already tight, and the timber wants to spring up, it means you are having to push harder towards the blade because of the extra friction created by the springing timber.

Personally, I set the fence so that the end is in line with the first tooth of the blade when cutting sawn timber. This allows the timber to spring away from the blade un hindered. If it wants to close in on the blade, a little wedge at the opening of the cut helps to ease the cut. I don’t use feather boards at work but I do have a very large and sturdy overhead extractor hood which will stop anything that wants to jump up. I do however ALWAYS have the riving knife installed.

Hope this helps,

Garry

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

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albachippie

758 posts in 2501 days


#7 posted 02-27-2015 09:26 AM


I would say that you are standing on the wrong side of the board. It sounds like you are standing where the off cuts are going. You should be on the side of the fence that doesn t have wood next to it. If you can move your on/off switch over then great. If not, its more important not to be in line of wood that is next to a moving blade.

- Minorhero

Really?? I may be missunderstanding you here, but, I would have thought, and was taught, and teach others, to stand so you can keep steady pressure on the timber you are feeding into the saw, ie directly in line of the blade. Once you have got passed the riving knife and are at a comfortable stage, you need to keep the timber moving, whilst keeping slight pressure against the fence. How can this be done from the other side of the fence?

I am open to correction here,

Garry

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#8 posted 02-27-2015 10:27 AM

One of the primary reasons to get a jointer is to flatten a reference face of a board, then straighten and square an adjacent edge. Every step forward from there will reference off those surfaces. The flat face goes against the saw table, the flat edge goes against the fence. That should make the outcome predictable. Without those two reference points, the results are random depending on any deviations in the board.

Always make sure your blade is sharp and appropriate for the task. Make sure the saw alignment is spot on….fence parallel with blade, riving knife parallel with blade and aligned with the blade, fence is straight, etc. Press downward and toward the fence when feeding the board. I prefer a push shoe over a push stick….or a Gripper. You’re already using a featherboard to hold the piece against the fence, but you can also use one to hold the board down to the table.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2441 days


#9 posted 02-27-2015 12:06 PM

The vertical feather board and/or infeed side roller stand sound like the ticket…

View Bmezz's profile

Bmezz

34 posts in 849 days


#10 posted 02-27-2015 12:32 PM



Don t feel bad, this is a pretty common problem. When dealing with a lot of board sticking out in front of the blade its is easy to get it starting to ride up. Before the section your hand is on gets to the table you should forgo the push stick to use both hands. Make sure one hand is holding the board steady and the other is holding it down to the table so it doesn t ride up. Once the part of the board you are holding reaches the table, switch to the push stick if the board is narrow enough to need it. That s going to be if there is less room between the blade and the fence then your hand spread wide.

I would say that you are standing on the wrong side of the board. It sounds like you are standing where the off cuts are going. You should be on the side of the fence that doesn t have wood next to it. If you can move your on/off switch over then great. If not, its more important not to be in line of wood that is next to a moving blade.
With respect, that sounds like dangerous advise to me. How do you control the board from the off side of the fence? Anyhow, sometimes if the blade isn’t raised high enough the board will try to climb it. Long rips are inherently dangerous at the beginning and end of the cut. Roller stands, feather boards etc. all help but the most important tool is the one between your ears. All of your senses will inform you of what’s going on.

- Minorhero


-- Member Valley Woodturners Ottawa

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albachippie

758 posts in 2501 days


#11 posted 02-27-2015 01:10 PM


With respect, that sounds like dangerous advise to me. How do you control the board from the off side of the fence? Anyhow, sometimes if the blade isn t raised high enough the board will try to climb it. Long rips are inherently dangerous at the beginning and end of the cut. Roller stands, feather boards etc. all help but the most important tool is the one between your ears. All of your senses will inform you of what s going on.

- Bmezz

I agree

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

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Bill7255

354 posts in 1750 days


#12 posted 02-27-2015 01:31 PM

Not sure I am following the above on where to stand. I stand just to the left of the blade, so I am not inline with the board against the fence. If a kickback would occur it would be the piece between the fence and blade. This sounds like where you stood. Feather boards are good, there is also “board buddies” that work well. Not sure what blade you were using, but ripping blades work better than combination. I would also check the blade and fence alignment. I have my blade .001 towards the miter slot away from the fence at the back of the blade and my fence .001 away from the slot at the rear. What you don’t want is the blade towards the fence to pinch the wood against the fence and blade at the back.

-- Bill R

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dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#13 posted 02-27-2015 02:23 PM

Wood will climb the blade depending on hook angle, number of teeth, sharpness, blade height, feed rate etc. You can lift the back end of the board slightly to force the part being cut down until you get well into the cut. It’s a good idea to make sure you have a bit of waste at the beginning and end of your cut. You can simply clamp a piece of wood onto your fence to act as a hold down, don’t need to go out and buy specialized tools to do that.

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Bill7255

354 posts in 1750 days


#14 posted 02-27-2015 02:45 PM


You can simply clamp a piece of wood onto your fence to act as a hold down, don t need to go out and buy specialized tools to do that.

- dhazelton

That’s a darn good idea. Wish I had thought of it, and will use that tip. Thanks

-- Bill R

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#15 posted 02-27-2015 03:44 PM



You can simply clamp a piece of wood onto your fence to act as a hold down, don t need to go out and buy specialized tools to do that.

- dhazelton

I’m sure that’d be a help in a pinch, but it behaves a little differently than a featherboard that gives a little once adjusted. I’d think that by the time the top board is close enough to have much downward holding effect, it’d also be creating some extra resistance.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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