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Veneering with Oysters

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Forum topic by Yettiman posted 05-20-2009 10:50 PM 1159 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Yettiman

163 posts in 3197 days


05-20-2009 10:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi,

Can anyone give me any advice on veneering with oysters.

Any special way / time of the year to cut them?

How do I dry season them?

What type of glue is it best to use with them?

How thick should I cut them?

Are there any good refence books / websites I can look at?

Sorry for the Q/A style of the post, but I wanted to let everyone lnow the type of info (ie any) that I need

Many thanks for reading?

-- Keep your tools sharp, your mind sharper and the coffee hot


10 replies so far

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3547 days


#1 posted 05-20-2009 11:05 PM

I never knew you could do anything with oysters other than eat them.

I don’t think they will taste any better if they have veneer on them.

Seriously, are you trying to use the nacre? Mother of pearl?
Are the veneers going to be used on a curved surface? I never knew an oyster to have a straight line.
As to the time of year they are dead when they are dead. Oysters “R” in season in months that have an “r” in them so you are about out of fresh oysters.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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Yettiman

163 posts in 3197 days


#2 posted 05-20-2009 11:07 PM

Hi Sawdust,

Oysters is the term we Brits call the cut accros a small branch, it show all the growth rings and is notorious for splitting as it drys.

It looks a bit like a drinks coaster

-- Keep your tools sharp, your mind sharper and the coffee hot

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3187 days


#3 posted 05-20-2009 11:26 PM

I was just about to send you over to the videos by Chad Stanton AKA thebigchopperoo. He made a box with inlay and video’d the process.

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Yettiman

163 posts in 3197 days


#4 posted 05-21-2009 12:01 AM

Awesome, many thanks Hokiemojo, I look forward to them, many many thanks

-- Keep your tools sharp, your mind sharper and the coffee hot

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3036 days


#5 posted 05-21-2009 12:35 AM

Hey I was thinking the same thing Sawdust posted but now I’m More informed

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3547 days


#6 posted 05-22-2009 05:06 AM

Me, too. Just when I thought i knew everything.

I can see why you call it an oyster.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3547 days


#7 posted 05-22-2009 05:15 AM

I cannot think of their names right now but there is a famous father/son family of turners.
Their shtick is REALLY big hollow turnings with really small openings

The son came to the guild once and had a bowl where he had put limbs in probably acrylic so that they were all oriented to the center, thus leaving visible the portion which would be the “oyster” end of the limb. Hundreds of limb ends showing.
He was then basically turning end grain all the time.

It was an amazing bowl.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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Gary

8968 posts in 2892 days


#8 posted 05-22-2009 05:31 AM

So Lee, you say that bowl had a lot of shtick’s shticking out of it???

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View kimball's profile

kimball

323 posts in 2757 days


#9 posted 05-23-2009 07:24 PM

Hi back at ya,
I’ve had the best results by only doing in months that have a “R” in them. Tobasco sauce helps also.
Kimball

View thelt's profile

thelt

661 posts in 2839 days


#10 posted 05-24-2009 01:22 PM

Now that’s MY kind of oyster! A saltine and a little Tobasco make em even better.

-- When asked what I did to make life worthwhile in my lifetime....I can respond with a great deal of pride and satisfaction, "I served a career in the United States Navy."

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