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Modify surface of wet grinding wheel

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Forum topic by Ray posted 02-25-2015 03:50 PM 732 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ray

120 posts in 1470 days


02-25-2015 03:50 PM

Is it possible to dress a wheel in a way that will yield different grits?
Thanks

-- Creating less fire wood every day


8 replies so far

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

853 posts in 1577 days


#1 posted 02-25-2015 03:59 PM

Tormek sells a stone grader for their wet grinder. Here is a link one company selling them.

I have wondered if it would work with my Grizzly version of the Tormek

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View OhioMike's profile

OhioMike

73 posts in 1629 days


#2 posted 02-25-2015 04:11 PM

You don’t say what machine you have but I own both the Grizzly (made by Sheppach) and the Tormek. Both respond to the stone grader that Jesse linked to.

The stone on either the Grizzly or the Tormek can be as coarse as 250 grit or as smooth as 1000 grit.

I have found that if I don’t use the stone grader, the stone naturally becomes smoother with use – more like a 1000 grit stone – and that’s how I like it. I only regrade the stone to 250 if I have to grind a very badly damaged tool.

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waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#3 posted 02-25-2015 04:12 PM

View Ray's profile

Ray

120 posts in 1470 days


#4 posted 02-25-2015 04:26 PM

“You don’t say what machine you have…”

I have the 8” Central Machinery wet grinder. It was given to me. I think it came from Harbor Freight. It looks very similar to the Grizzly.

-- Creating less fire wood every day

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

296 posts in 3435 days


#5 posted 02-27-2015 12:22 PM

Why bother?

The result of the finest re-grading is never going to be fine enough for a bench chisel or plane blade. You still need to hone the edge on waterstones, etc.

Stick to the coarsest grade, keep the surface clean … treat the Tormek as a grinder.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View unbob's profile

unbob

719 posts in 1370 days


#6 posted 02-27-2015 04:01 PM

Using industrial cutter grinding machines, the way a wheel is dressed will determine how it cuts. For example, if a sharp diamond point is moved rapidly across the wheel, the grit will open up and be more free cutting. Moving the diamond slowly across the wheel, the grains close up some, the finish will be finer. Using an abrasive dressing stick the grains in the wheel can be closed up further resulting in a bit finer surface finish, but slower cutting.
A useful method, as its not easy to change wheels.

View Ray's profile

Ray

120 posts in 1470 days


#7 posted 02-27-2015 09:36 PM



Why bother?

The result of the finest re-grading is never going to be fine enough for a bench chisel or plane blade. You still need to hone the edge on waterstones, etc.

Stick to the coarsest grade, keep the surface clean … treat the Tormek as a grinder.

Regards from Perth

Derek

- Derek Cohen

Thanks-

I came to the same conclusion yesterday based on the replies that I have received.

-- Creating less fire wood every day

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#8 posted 02-27-2015 09:58 PM

To answer your question…. NO

Regardless how you dress the stone… you cannot change a 80 grit stone to a 120 grit stone, using a stone dresser. The grit was chosen at the factory, and is friable (so it breaks away from the stone) exposing more 80 grit material as it wears.

cant change the grit with a diamond dresser.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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