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Craftsman Planer with issues...

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Forum topic by Marc posted 02-25-2015 01:47 AM 761 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marc

10 posts in 650 days


02-25-2015 01:47 AM

I have an older craftsman planer (220v with 5hp motor) that I cannot get to properly run wood through.

I had a buddy pick it up from a guy off facebook and the guy ran a 2×4 through it for my buddy. I picked it up from my buddy a few days later and didn’t mess with it for a week or so.

I adjusted the lever to 3/4 inch for some hardwood that was true, and I couldn’t get it to feed. Realized that the roller on the infeed was too low toward the infeed table.

I can’t totally tell, but it seems that the blade is 3/4 inch from the table.

I have loosened the top adjusting screws to loosen the tension on the roller but still haven’t had any luck.

Any thoughts? I am at a point where I just want to sell it, but if I can’t even demonstrate that it works, it will be a tough sell.

I have tried it with a 2×4 unsuccessfully…


18 replies so far

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MrUnix

4212 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 02-25-2015 03:13 AM

Can’t read the model number, but it looks like a craftsman badged belsaw 12” planer. Are you saying that you set the thickness to 3/4” and then tried to shove some wood through it, or you tried to take a 3/4” cut, or ??? How thick was the wood and how much of a cut? You also really need to clean up the beds and give them some wax so the wood slides easily over it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Marc

10 posts in 650 days


#2 posted 02-25-2015 03:56 AM

Unix,

The wood I have is 3/4. and I set the cut depth to 3/4, just to get the wood through it, and I was going to slowly adjust it down.

I know that the feed table needs some love, but if I can’t get wood through it in any fashion then the cleaning of the table can wait

Thanks

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Marc

10 posts in 650 days


#3 posted 02-25-2015 04:00 AM

The planer model is 306.2339 I have the manual, but it doesn’t give much info

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runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#4 posted 02-25-2015 04:20 AM

I realize photos can be deceiving, but that table looks really dirty, which will create a lot of friction. Needs not only to be cleaned, but lubricated as well. I know a lot of LJs recommend wax, but I have good luck with Dry Lube (a silicone formula, I believe).

You say you need to be able to get wood through it before you’ll clean it, but you’re asking a lot of a planer in that condition. I don’t know what kind of rollers that planer has. If rubberized, they should be thoroughly cleaned (not with a lubricant!!), and dried. It may be the rubber has gotten old and has a glazed surface, which would be a sure recipe for not feeding wood.

There used to be a product for rejuvenating typewriter rollers (shows how old I am) by deglazing them. Don’t
know if it still exists, but it might work well if you can find some. Office supply stores carried it.

Just thought of one more point: if you set the depth to the existing thickness of your wood, you may simply be not getting enough contact with the rollers for them to do their job.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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tomd

2026 posts in 3232 days


#5 posted 02-25-2015 04:20 AM

The rollers are spring loaded, make sure the roller turns then a little WD40 on the guides at the end of the rollers where the roller rides up the guides might do it. Just my 2c.

-- Tom D

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MrUnix

4212 posts in 1661 days


#6 posted 02-25-2015 04:21 AM

Indeed a belsaw planer/moulder.. nice machine and built like a tank. I have been looking for a nice old belsaw for a while without success. The manual has the procedure for adjusting the feed rollers, but with the beds like they are, I doubt it is going to feed at all when taking off basically nothing.. setting the height to 3/4” and using 3/4” stock doesn’t remove any material. And the beds need to be absolutely clean, smooth and waxed for anything to slide over them. I would clean and wax the beds, verify the knives are set properly and then try taking some 1/16” or 1/32” passes and adjusting the feed roller tension appropriately as described in the manual.

There is a lot of information about those planers over at the OWWM site with lots of owners who hang out there, so it might be worthwhile to check over there for model specific details.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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nonserviam

29 posts in 1454 days


#7 posted 02-25-2015 04:27 AM

I will concur with MrUnix…my neighbor across the street bought a belsaw badged planer just like this a few months back and was having problems with it not feeding properly, after a bunch of the two of us tinkering around his old man took one look at thing and said “it’s never gonna push anything through that gunk” pointing to the bed which we “thought” we had cleaned pretty well…not even close….clean that bed up and I bet it will solve a bunch of problems for ya. Hope it’s that easy!!

-- -Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur-

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Marc

10 posts in 650 days


#8 posted 02-25-2015 05:38 AM

Everything is making perfect sense that you are all saying, however, when I set the cut depth to 3/4, for a 3/4 piece of wood, it is just to see if the wood will move through. The issue that I am running into is that the blade depth is 3/4, but the roller depth is more like 3/8 maybe 1/2 inch. The wood is just being pushed into a roller that isn’t high enough to suck it in.

I will definitely clean the table and lube the stuff up. What should I use to lube the chain. One of the chains seems very loose, but it works.

What is the OWWM site? This seems like a great place for information. I know that this is a good planer, and I would hate to have to let it go. I got a great deal on it

Thanks again everyone, it is appreciated. I have only been here for 2 days and I can already tell I will surely become addicted

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MrUnix

4212 posts in 1661 days


#9 posted 02-25-2015 08:41 AM

What is the OWWM site?

Old Woodworking Machinery site where you will find various forums for woodworking, metalworking, electrical and other old machine stuff and really helpful members: http://www.owwm.org/

Also associated with them is their ‘mother ship’, the Vintage Machinery Site that contains a great manufacturers index complete with histories,publications (known as ‘dirty paper’), photos, etc.. and a wiki chock full of information, how-to’s and stuff like that: : http://www.vintagemachinery.org

Both are an invaluable resource for working with, identifying, restoring, repairing and maintaining old machinery.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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rick1955

258 posts in 892 days


#10 posted 02-25-2015 08:49 AM

When I was working as a technician Iused to go to all kinds of schools and shops and deal with planisphere dishes and the first thing I did was clean and wax the bed. You cannot feed anything through that planer with the bed in that condition.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View Marc's profile

Marc

10 posts in 650 days


#11 posted 02-25-2015 02:54 PM

I will do some research on what to use to wax the bed with, and will clean it thoroughly today when I get home. I am sure WD-40 will be a good friend throughout this process. This will also serve purpose for me to wax the table saw and jointer.

Brad- Thank you so much for the info. I will be researching until my eyes bleed I am sure.

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Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#12 posted 02-25-2015 03:21 PM

I would avoid any silicone based lubricants. Any residue can create real problems when finishing.

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MrUnix

4212 posts in 1661 days


#13 posted 02-25-2015 03:28 PM

Start by scraping off the chunky stuff with WD-40 and a razor blade.. that will get most of the rust and encrusted stuff off. Then use WD and a scotch brite pad. A vibrating sander used with the pad makes things a bit easier. Keep scrubbing until it’s clean and then give it a good coating or three of paste wax. If you feel like taking the machine apart, there are other methods that can also be used on the rest of the parts as well (electrolysis, evaporust are the two main and least destructive ones).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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JoeinGa

7480 posts in 1469 days


#14 posted 02-25-2015 03:32 PM

Sounds like your gauge is off.
You said ” The issue that I am running into is that the blade depth is 3/4, but the roller depth is more like 3/8 maybe 1/2 inch. The wood is just being pushed into a roller that isn’t high enough to suck it in.”

I’m betting if you adjust the height UP to where the board will JUST SLIDE under the roller (with the machine turned OFF). Now remove the board and lower it about 1/8” or 1/16”... THEN turn it on and try to send your board thru.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Marc's profile

Marc

10 posts in 650 days


#15 posted 02-25-2015 07:06 PM


I m betting if you adjust the height UP to where the board will JUST SLIDE under the roller (with the machine turned OFF). Now remove the board and lower it about 1/8” or 1/16”... THEN turn it on and try to send your board thru.

- JoeinGa

I don’t think the gauge is off… Like I said when the gauge reads 3/4, the blade is 3/4. It is the roller that is too low.

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