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Forum topic by DuaneEDMD posted 05-17-2009 04:56 PM 2028 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DuaneEDMD

115 posts in 2818 days


05-17-2009 04:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: milling planer

Having seen all the great cutting boards posted here and having made a couple myself, I wanted to survey the group about using a power planer on end grain cutting boards. I have asked several people within their project posts about planing their end-grain boards and have got a wide range of answers so I thought I would take it to the forum. Do you ever run your end-grain cutting boards through a power planer? Why or why not? Good results or bad? Tricks to make it work better? Thanks to all who share their knowledge.

-- --It's not how long you live, but how you live that makes it a life.--


16 replies so far

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marcb

768 posts in 3139 days


#1 posted 05-17-2009 05:04 PM

You can, but its not perfect. You will still need a lot of sanding to fix the possible tear out.

Sturdy planer is a must. I personally wouldn’t put it through a lunch box.

Sharp knives, not sharp enough to do wood still, SHARP

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NY_Rocking_Chairs

507 posts in 3063 days


#2 posted 05-17-2009 05:17 PM

I am about to finish my first end-grain so looking forward to seeing the responses…

-- Rich, anybody want a peanut?

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dalec

613 posts in 3354 days


#3 posted 05-17-2009 06:04 PM

I recall seeing a discussion on on “the woodwhisperer forum” where the question was asked if it was ok to run end grain through a planer.

Here is the link:

http://thewoodwhisperer.com/end-grain-through-the-planer-question-of-the-week/

I have considered it i the past, but thinking about the possible outcomes (huge kickback or something exploring inside my planer) makes me think, maybe there is another safer way to do it.

Dalec

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#4 posted 05-17-2009 06:22 PM

I would say it depends on the planner I think you would have better success with a spiral head planner but ultimately the tool I think is best for end grain boards is a drum sander.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Francisco Luna

939 posts in 2859 days


#5 posted 05-17-2009 06:34 PM

I agree with Jim, a spiral head or new Sharp Tersa knives, very precisely installed and taking just 1/32” would make the job.
What about traditional handplanes and hand scrapers?

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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DuaneEDMD

115 posts in 2818 days


#6 posted 05-17-2009 07:21 PM

I went to the link reference above and read the post and replies. The general feeling there was don’t do it and if you have been doing it and it is working, you are very lucky and you don’t want that luck to run out so stop now. I have to admit that I only have a block plane and a shoulder plane. I plan on expanding my plane collection and maybe this is the time. A sharp jack plane #5 do the job???

-- --It's not how long you live, but how you live that makes it a life.--

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Francisco Luna

939 posts in 2859 days


#7 posted 05-17-2009 07:43 PM

Yes.
both planes.
If the blockplane is a low angle, a 38 or 50 degrees bevel on the blade would do a better work.
Regarding the #5, a back bevel would help also…...I’ll be sharing more info in the afternoon.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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Francisco Luna

939 posts in 2859 days


#8 posted 05-17-2009 09:16 PM

I do not have direct experience with cutting boards, and I have never seen how looks the piece after clamping all those little pieces, I imaging a rough surface with lots of glue spills…..

To get the pietce flat, this tools come to mind:
a.Scrup plane
b.Belt sander
c. A grinder with this disc
d. a router sledge

that last one would be my choise if you are planning to make cutting boards regularly, because a nice, mirror like finish is obtained with a $5 card scraper

This is a Maple top I made and you can see the nice and smooth surface:

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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Ampeater

425 posts in 3213 days


#9 posted 05-18-2009 02:49 AM

Hey guys, we are talking about end-grain here aren’t we? A hand plane or a scraper would be difficult and time consuming to say the least. I have make several end-grain cutting boards and I used my Delta 13” planer on them.

Here is the way I did it.

1. Remove any high spots and glue with a belt sander.

2. Select the smoothest side and use the belt sander on it until the board will not rock on a flat surface.

3. Round over all edges of the board with a router. This will almost totally eliminate tear-out.

4. Since I was going to coat the finished board with mineral oil, I applied a soaking coat prior to planing. This also helps to eliminate tear-out. This step may not be needed with some woods.

5. Plane the board with very shallow cuts and with the board placed with the side down that was sanded in step 2. I cut less than 1/64” on each pass. Continue planing until this side is smooth and flat.

6. Flip the board over and plane the other side.

I did not find that anything about this process was dangerous and the boards looked good.

-- "A goal without a plan is a wish."

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3208 days


#10 posted 05-18-2009 03:39 AM

I follow initially the strategy of ampeater using a belt sander
I pass mine through the planer – DW735 but very fine cuts

I never had any issues with tearout of the surface, rather I would get a flaking/blow-out of the trailing edge passing through the planer.

I put about a 1/8 to 3/16 chamfer on the ‘short’ ends otherwise the planer wants to blow out the edge.
Take extremely light passes

after it is flat, I pass the edges on the jointer ~1/16 then use a 3/16 radius round over bit on the router table to round over all the edges.

Suppose if the dimension is critical, one could attach a ‘sacrificial scrap’ or simply use one more strip in the glue-up, then once flat, trim it off on a miter sled.

Easy way is to have a big drum sander, but I haven’t justified the cost yet.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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dustbunny

1149 posts in 2760 days


#11 posted 05-31-2009 08:44 PM

Ditto on the planer strategy. I run all my end grain cutting boards through my 13” DeWalt. Routing over the edges with a round over bit is a must. I also go 1/8 or less turn on each pass. The only thing I don’t do is belt sand. I use a 1 1/2” chisel to remove any glue, sort of like scraping. Only had a problem once, because I got mad about a knot that was lurking beneath the surface that exposed itself, I cranked down 1/2 turn and blew out the back edge grain. WHAT WAS I THINKING?
Anyway, it works for me if I’m cool about it.

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

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mski

418 posts in 3446 days


#12 posted 06-01-2009 03:25 AM

Delta 13” 2 speed, Ultra Light passes, 1/8 turn per pass.
Takes awhile but quicker than sanding, after that it was 100 grit and finer.
We made 8 boards and my blades were sharp as a razor afterwards , I found out while cleaning them, OUCH!!

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2863 days


#13 posted 06-01-2009 09:39 AM

I have the Powermatic 15HH with the Byrd insert hed and have run endgrain cutting boards through it. It still produces a little chip out on the trailing edge but that goes away when I square the cutting board up anyway. See the link below for a story I did on building end grain cutting boards. Near the end there is a video that actually shows the amount of chipping from the planer.

http://www.newwoodworker.com/bldendgrncutbrds.html

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

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mski

418 posts in 3446 days


#14 posted 06-02-2009 11:25 PM

Tom I rounded over the edges and that eliminated the chipout,

-- MARK IN BOB, So. CAL

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

382 posts in 2975 days


#15 posted 06-03-2009 02:38 PM

For thoes of us without a planer…I still turn to a router jig.

All my cutting boards have been edge grain but this method is still valid for end grain. It does take some work to clean the surface from the individual mill passes…but I suspect a planer is the same. Use as wide a bit as possible to minimize the number of passes…but the wider the bit the more precise the sled needs to be aligned to parallel. I also use this jig to plane stock down to project thickness.

Good luck, Duane.

Greg

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

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