LumberJocks

Where do I get a replacement fan for a motor?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by soob posted 02-24-2015 11:16 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


02-24-2015 11:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: motor parts

The bearings in my jointer’s motor (an old 2 HP Dayton) are shot, so I took it apart to replace them. The fan or impeller (whatever it is) on the back of the motor did not survive the disassembly (it was broken already, but it’s more broke now).

It looks like it should be a pretty ordinary part, and I know I’ve seen similar fans attached similarly on motors before. But darned if I can find them for sale online. The particular motor I have is still sold but they don’t seem to offer any replacement parts for it. It’s a Dayton 6K393 if that’s of any use.

Any help or advice would be appreciated. Thanks in advance!


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1663 days


#1 posted 02-24-2015 11:29 PM

You might be able to contact Dayton and get one. There are also some aftermarket suppliers that might have them, such as these guys: http://www.jenkins.com/SpecialtyParts/tabid/115/Default.aspx

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#2 posted 02-24-2015 11:56 PM

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#3 posted 02-25-2015 01:02 AM

While waiting for this topic to be approved I learned a little more, I think, about the part. Apparently Dayton either never existed as a manufacturer, or it no longer does. It’s apparently distributed and/or owned by Grainger now. And Grainger will not sell you parts for it if you do not have a “business account” with them. They wouldn’t even look to see if they actually have the part.

I went through hundreds of electric motor fans on ebay to no avail. Looked through the Jenkins website and didn’t see anything that looks like it. I think they cater to much larger and more expensive motors, but I will e-mail them and ask. No luck with ereplacementparts.com.

I believe I have found the fan through pure brute force googling. Apparently the same company made a number of motors including DeWalt, Emerson, Doerr, Nidec. A company called EIC seems to be the only source and they’ll give it to me for the friendly low price of just $42 shipped. I think this is it, page 201 #3: http://www.eis-inc.com/files/pdf/EIS-Holden_Section2.pdf

The shaft has peculiar dimensions—it’s a “double d” type that’s 1/2 by 11/16. Yeah, 11/16. It might be a fairly standard motor but I just can’t find anyone who sells them for an honest price. I am on the fence about whether it’s worth it to replace the fan and bearings given that the motor has quite a bit of corrosion. It might just end up being good money after bad. And a lot of time spent googling. I could get a similar motor at harbor freight for $125 or so.

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#4 posted 02-25-2015 04:10 AM

Ugh. Looking at it closely the centrifgual switch is busted too. It rusted through. $30 for that. I think this motor is scrap. $30 for the switch, $25 for the fan, $30 for the bearings. Plus $20 to ship it. That’s 3/4 of the harbor freight motor right there.

At least the work on the jointer is coming along nicely. It’s a Yates-American J131. An 8” jointer with a 50” bed. From the 1950s. My dad gave it to me (it wasn’t his, he just got it from somebody a while back as a project).

Very tricky to disassemble but through the judicious use of leverage, wedges, and hammers, I got it all taken apart. It needs new bearings too, plus knives.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 02-25-2015 04:26 AM

Yup, sounds like it’s too far gone.. not sure if I would get a HF motor, but that’s your call.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Don’t know where you are getting your bearings, but $30 for two for that motor is more than twice what you should be paying.. I just ordered two 6205’s from Accurate Bearing and it ran me $15 including shipping, and bearings for your motor should be even less (6205’s are pretty big bearings).

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#6 posted 02-25-2015 04:39 AM

I’ve hammered on my share of bearings, but I really am no expert on motors. For $135 (including tax) I could get the harbor freight motor. It’s 2 horsepower and the right RPM for this jointer (which, IIRC, came with a 3/4 HP motor back when horses were real horses). Still, I expect 2 horsepower from harbor freight, whatever that means, would be plenty good. The HFT motor’s not totally enclosed, but this jointer has a dust chute so it should be fine. The reviews on the website seem to be okay, with a few negatives that you’d expect from anything. But they have a 90-day warranty so it’s not such a big risk.

On the other hand, motors are pretty simple animals, or at least, they seem to be to me. So maybe it would be worth keeping the old motor. The switch on the back seems to be fine. But I don’t know what impact the corrosion would have on other parts. That’s why I’m reluctant to invest a hundred bucks in parts given the risk that I either won’t be able to reassemble it, or that it will fail soon from some other cause related to the corrosion.

Interestingly the outside of the jointer is in good shape. I’m not sure why the inside of the cabinet is so corroded.

ETA: I am not totally sure about the bearings. The ones from the motor are peculiar. They may have generic analogues though. I haven’t gotten a quote yet.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1663 days


#7 posted 02-25-2015 04:48 AM

I am not totally sure about the bearings. The ones from the motor are peculiar. They may have generic analogues though.

Most bearings are generic.. even fairly vintage ones.. Motor manufacturers don’t make bearings, they order them from bearing manufacturers and incorporate them into their end bell design. I haven’t found a motor yet that required anything other than a standard bearing, and haven’t had any problem cross matching between manufacturers.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#8 posted 02-25-2015 05:14 AM

Ah, thanks Brad. I appreciate the wisdom. Do you have an opinion about the corrosion? There seems to be some surface rust on all the motor components. I would not have thought it was too bad, but the cent. switch is corroded through. One of the weights is missing. Curiously it ran okay (other than awful bearing noise) so maybe that broke when I took it apart. I haven’t seen the weight on my shop floor—but it is a mess.

I took this jointer for a project, because I like tinkering with machines as much as anything (and I certainly have more experience with that than woodworking) but I kind of resent it at this point. It’s not like I couldn’t afford a new one with a long bed, a spiral cutterhead, and parallelogram tables. I have learned a lot while playing with it, which I wouldn’t have with a new one. So that’s something at least. I just hate being extorted for the parts.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1663 days


#9 posted 02-25-2015 05:44 AM

If you can’t figure out a way to fix the centrifugal switch, it’s probably not worth going any further on it IMHO.. while it may run, if the switch doesn’t break contact after spin up, you will probably let out the magic smoke pretty quickly. I’d keep an eye out for a nice vintage motor that more matches the period of the jointer. They pop up on CL now and then fairly cheap since the sellers think they are just old junkers. But that’s just me.. I like trying to keep my restores period correct if at all possible.

Surface rust isn’t that big of a deal and can be easily removed with a wire brush, steel wool, sandpaper, etc..

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#10 posted 03-19-2015 03:08 AM

I got the bearings from accurate bearing and the motor parts from EIS. The bearings cost about $8; the motor fan and centrifugal switch—about $80. I put it back together, and, to my amazement—it worked.

I was really not sure about the centrifugal switch. The replacement had six weights instead of three, even though the catalogue said three weights. Apparently the maker of the switch says that doesn’t make any difference. Whatever.

I drove it back onto the shaft as far as the original was, but it’s hard to check it for proper functioning since you can’t see if it’s contacting the rear switch without assembling the motor. It seems to work! I ran it for about ten minutes. Quiet and just a little vibration. The jointer’s almost ready too. One of its bearings was apparently not original and was the wrong width so the cutterhead could slide about 1/8” side to side. That’d be bad.

Anyway, thanks again for the help.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1663 days


#11 posted 03-19-2015 03:38 AM

I put it back together, and, to my amazement—it worked.

Cool… Glad you got it all sorted out. If the motor starts right up, then you probably have the centrifugal switch installed just fine (and the number of weights, 3 vs 6, doesn’t really matter).

Now you just need to figure out what’s going on with the cutter head. Might need bearings with extended inner races. You never said what make/model/age the jointer was, but many of the older machines frequently had felt seal bearings (as opposed to shielded) that were a bit wider. For those, the 87xxx or 88xxx series rubber seal bearings can usually be used (which one depends on if you need one side extended or both).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 673 days


#12 posted 03-19-2015 04:53 AM

Brad, you’re right on the money as usual. The 87xxx is exactly what I got from the folks at Accurate Bearing to replace the (one) original. I ordered another and that should do it; the holes for attaching the cutterhead caps have a little play in them so I can push them closer or farther apart a tad to adjust—I think. When I got it the bearings were rusted into the caps and so I didn’t anticipate this issue.

The jointer’s a Yates-American J131. I think it’s an older one because of the short tables. Seems to be pretty nicely made. A lot of the amenities are crummy—the depth of cut gauge is useless, the handles tiny, things like that, but the tables (even after I removed all the rust) are very flat and easy to adjust. I think it’ll work out real well for the tiny investment I have in it.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com