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Performax 16/32 - Favorite Grits?

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Forum topic by Keith Kelly posted 02-24-2015 04:31 PM 879 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1127 days


02-24-2015 04:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sander performax grit

I just picked up my father-in-law’s Performax 16/32 Plus w/ outfeed tables to borrow and restore. It needs a new conveyor belt, which I found at SuperGrit for a good price.

Now that I’m already paying SuperGrit shipping, I figure it’s best to buy some of their 3” cloth rolls (rather than buying precut elsewhere) So, without prior usage of a Performax, I’m trying to figure out which grits I ought to focus on. Like, is there a magical grit that I’ll use more than others? If so, then I’ll probably order a 50-yard roll for $60. Other grits I’ll just get a few yards of each.

My current projects are end grain cutting boards, a whole bunch of pizza peels, and other types of kitchen-like items for some relatives. I’d also like to use the Performax for final thicknessing of some woods that tear out super easy on the planer (my Claro Walnut and Hickory stock has super uneven grain)

I’m leaning towards buying coarser grits (36 or 60) and then finishing with a card scraper and/or ROS.

So, what grits do you find yourselves using more than others?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com


17 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 686 days


#1 posted 02-24-2015 04:41 PM

I’ve used 60, 100, 120, I think 180 and 220. on my 22-44

-- I meant to do that!

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1127 days


#2 posted 02-24-2015 04:59 PM

Which do you find yourself using most for final thicknessing of stock?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#3 posted 02-24-2015 05:38 PM

That’s pretty opposite of my experience. I settled into using mostly 120 grit. I’ve never used 36 or 80, and I’d bet sanding the scratches out from them would be a huge PITA (120 is bad enough). with the finer grits, the belts always got clogged regardless of combination of feed/depth/whatever. I kept a roll of 150 on hand, but found for the most part the 120 was as good a a balance as anything. I can see using the coarser grits for more rapid stock removal, but f you have a planer there’s little reason to do that on a DS. It does work well on woods prone to tear out, and the coarser grits may have a lot of use for that purpose. Since you just got this, I hope you have a DC to hook to it with a tight filter. It will generate a mountain of dust, and you
ll want to capture it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1127 days


#4 posted 02-24-2015 05:53 PM

Ok it sounds like 120 is what I should go for.

For dust collection, I have a couple of options:
  • Shop vac 6.5 “horsepower” with a bag that does an excellent job at capturing sanding dust. Low power, but contains dust nicely. (due to location I hope to use this)
  • 2hp Grizzly dust collector with 1550 CFM. However, the DC filter isn’t a real fine one. High power, but doesn’t control dust nicely.

How much air flow does this sander need?

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2405 posts in 2390 days


#5 posted 02-24-2015 05:58 PM

I use mostly 100 on my 22-44 for getting close to final thickness, but it really depends on your projects.
Have all the other grits too, and lower grit works well for final flattening of short pieces too wide for jointers, switching the grits out as you do RO, it takes out scratches nicely. Especially good on large batches of same size pieces.

After sanding with 100, I use RO sanders, moving up in the grits.

your 2HP Grizzly will be sufficient, I have an Oneida cyclone hooked to my ducting, nothing special about my filter, works fine.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#6 posted 02-24-2015 06:04 PM

The DC will be all you need, but if it doesn’t have good filtration it may wind up recirculating more dust than it captures. The vac probably just isn’t going to cut it. One last comment: do not ever, ever, under any circumstances, put soft wood through it…hardwoods only.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1127 days


#7 posted 02-24-2015 06:07 PM

ok, I’ll use the DC and just air out the garage after sanding. (I use fans and a leaf blower quite frequently)

Thanks for the help!

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3006 days


#8 posted 02-24-2015 06:38 PM

I was probably the first one or one of the first ones in Georgia to buy a 22-44 pro max 3 about 21 years ago and it’s still going strong. I bought it from Highland Hardware at an IWF show. The only thing I’ve had to do to it was replace the conveyor belt and I think I got that at Stone Mt. Power Tools about 10 years ago.

I tried several grits and have used nothing but 120 on it since the beginning. As a matter of fact I still have the original wrap that came on it that I use for a template to cut new ones for it.

I use a small dust collector on it and have no dust problems what so ever.

The “older” I get the more important that 22-44 comes into play for me.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2240 days


#9 posted 02-24-2015 06:52 PM

I used 120 almost exclusively, but now I have started using 180 mostly. As Fred Hargis said 120 is not completely scratch free. I did use 60 for taking the crown out of some wood, then came back with 180 to clean it up. It worked great and I got the wood for next to nothing…..
Caveat…180 on Cherry is not good, Cherry and Maple burn easily, make sure to take light cuts and go a little faster than normal.
Good luck with it, I never thought I would use it as much as I do…
Mike

View Keith Kelly's profile

Keith Kelly

223 posts in 1127 days


#10 posted 02-25-2015 02:18 PM

How valuable do you find the infeed/outfeed tables? I’m considering removing them for the sake of space (my shop is in a 2-car garage)

Since the drum sander doesn’t have rollers keeping the wood down on the table (like a planer) I’m assuming that I’ll have to be more attentive to keeping longer wood level with the table.

-- Keith - Bolivar, Missouri, http://www.SquareOneWoodworks.com

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1749 days


#11 posted 02-25-2015 02:55 PM

Hmm! My Supermax has pressure rollers. I don’t know about the Performax, but would suspect it does also. I would also suggest a overhead air cleaner. Grizzly had theirs on sale for a little over $100, about as cheap as you could build one unless you have the materials.

-- Bill R

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 686 days


#12 posted 02-25-2015 07:21 PM

I never used the 22-44 to size material only to sand smooth. I have a JPM13 for sizing

-- I meant to do that!

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2240 days


#13 posted 02-25-2015 08:10 PM

You can certainly get snipe, much like a planer…the more the infeed/out feed space you have the less it will be a factor. I also hve the supermax which doesn’t have tables beyond the belt, but I have two roller system that I use and it certainly lessens the possiblity of any sort of snipe.

Without rereading all the posts, I don’t know iif it was mentioned that a drum sander should not replace a planer, rather compliment it. You need to take slow, thin passes. This is not made to resize material…yes it will do it, but very slowly. This is not a quick tool by any means. Also I have just got a simple 1250 Cfm DC…I have never had any issues with this being dusty, the DC handles it well.
Mike

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1574 days


#14 posted 02-25-2015 08:46 PM

I have a 22/44…

I’ve used 24 and 36 grit for quick material removal on highly figured stock that my straight knife thickness planer will destroy. It’s a pass or three with both of those, then 60-80-120, as high as the particular material needs. Since highly figured stuff isn’t going to be pigment stained, it’s OK to go as high as 220 before dyeing or moving to hand finishing. With the heavy grits, I’ll usually alternate diagonal passes to better see if previous grit scratches have been properly removed.

Most “normal” stuff, previously jointed and planed, spends 99% of the sander time with 120. If I’m using a ROS to go further, I’ll start at the same grit with the ROS, then either stain it or continue to higher grits.

I’ll often run trim that is going to get a clear finish without a pigment stain 120 / 150 / 220. The Performax is a lot faster than a ROS for many feet of flat trim.

I’ve also used 24 grit to create a decorative textures on woods like cedar or cypress, for rustic projects. It’s easy to create a look similar to cedar shakes.

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3006 days


#15 posted 02-25-2015 11:07 PM

I have out feed rollers on my 22-44. The only time I get snipe on mine is when I pull up on what ever I’m sanding before it leaves the drum. I had some snipe when I first got mine and found the in feed and out feed hold down thingys were to tight. I loosen them up and had no more snipe If you have anything in feed an out feed be sure they’re level with the conveyor belt.

Sometimes if you’re sanding doors you’ll get a little snipe behind the door rail. Mine sopped that after I adjusted the tension on the in feed and out feed rollers.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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