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How do I seal Padauk to prevent color change?

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Forum topic by Scrappys_Squirt posted 1885 days ago 3776 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scrappys_Squirt

43 posts in 1958 days


1885 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: padauk color change seal

I want to make a box (and lots of other things lol ) out of padauk but I know it changes color quite drastically when exposed. my question is whether there is anything that I can seal it with that will prevent it from loosing its awesome color, or is the change light related. if anyone out there knows, I’d really appreciate some advise, I see so many beautiful projects that include it, its such a beautiful wood. What do you all use to seal it and does it do any good?
Thanks for any advise in advance

-- Amanda


17 replies so far

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Scrappys_Squirt

43 posts in 1958 days


#1 posted 1885 days ago

I did just find this post ( http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1485 ) I am getting ready to read it now…

-- Amanda

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TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2260 days


#2 posted 1885 days ago

Please let us know if you discover a “Magic Bullet” to preserve color or dramatically slow the change.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Scrappys_Squirt

43 posts in 1958 days


#3 posted 1885 days ago

so far no luck sorry..

-- Amanda

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Broda

313 posts in 2103 days


#4 posted 1885 days ago

I’v never used Padauk for anything but if its anything like purpleheart it is its richest colour straight after you mill it. after time it starts to go brownish and you think AHHHHHHHHH WHAT HAPPENED TO MY PURPLE!!!???
but after you mill it put it in the sun for a while and it will stay that colour.

but as i said, i’v never used padauk before, it might not be the same

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

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TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2260 days


#5 posted 1885 days ago

Broda, Are you saying the sun exposure will lock in the rich purple of purpleheart?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Durnik150

647 posts in 1906 days


#6 posted 1885 days ago

I’ve worked with both Padauk and Purpleheart but I’m not an expert (I just play one in my garage). I’ve heard that ultimately these woods will darken and brown and there is little if anything you can do. Purpleheart can be set in sunlight and it will reactivate slightly and regain a little bit of its color. I’ve been told that this gets less and less noticeable over time. Again, both of them will brown up as time goes by.

I made a box out of Padauk about 1 1/2 yrs ago and it was a vivid bright orange. I used several coats of poly and it held its color as long as I had it inside my house. I entered it in an art show and they put it in a glass box that was exposed to sunlight for 6-8 hours every day. When I retrieved the box at the end of the show (3 months) it had lost most of its bright orange and was now a dark umber color. The box is in my gallery so you can see the color that it ended up.

I’ll be watching as well to see if someone has a technique to lock in those colors.

-- Behind the Bark is a lot of Heartwood----Charles, Centennial, CO

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Broda

313 posts in 2103 days


#7 posted 1885 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor- durnik150 said it pretty well

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

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a1Jim

111999 posts in 2162 days


#8 posted 1885 days ago

House paint LOL I haven’t found a perfect way to keep most woods from changing color except to cover it totally or do you best to keep it out of direct sunlight and in a oxygen free atmosphere . So I guess ether paint it or put it on the dark side of the Moon. Dark woods tend to lighten and light woods tend to darken as very loose rule of thumb when exposed to direct sunlight. Some finishes help some.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Greg3G

815 posts in 2670 days


#9 posted 1885 days ago

I have used Padauk for a number of project, and I have asked that same question. What I have learned is that you can slow it down a little, but it will turn. I have managed to slow it with a UV protection poly but it will still darken and turn a rich brown. (I happen to like that too, so I’m still happy) If you use an oil finish it will turn a little quicker.

There is one other problem with Padauk, it can react with finishes sometime. I did a pair of boxes for a customer and had a big problem with it. I ended having remove the gummy finish, re-sand, then I wiped it down with Mineral Spirits. I then followed several LJ’ers suggestion and sealed it with a thin coat of Shellac. The Poly went back down great.

-- Greg - Charles Town, WV

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TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2260 days


#10 posted 1885 days ago

I see it on cutting boards some times on LJ. I guess there is no problem with food, eh?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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John Ormsby

1276 posts in 2322 days


#11 posted 1885 days ago

This is the reason one should really be careful when selecting grain for woods that turn so drastically. The grain will help give the aged piece character. I made a fly box out of padauk about 18 years ago and it looks just great. I have always kept out of direct sunlight.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2260 days


#12 posted 1885 days ago

Dave, Why pay the price for Padauk if you’re going to turn it brown on purpose? Walnut is cheap compared to Padauk!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

14552 posts in 2260 days


#13 posted 1885 days ago

Grain would definitely be different, but color is faily easy with stains/ dyes.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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scott shangraw

513 posts in 2654 days


#14 posted 1885 days ago

I’ve never tried it but was once told to put Armorall on the piece after the finish.Have been always hesitant to try it on a purple heart rocker after completion though !!!!!!

-- Scott NM,http://www.shangrilawoodworks.com

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scopemonkey

182 posts in 2748 days


#15 posted 1884 days ago

You will never stop the process. Keeping it out of sun or other UV light sources, using UV blocking poly, or as some have said, a good coat of paint are about the only precautions you can take. Of course, the obvious choice is use something other than padauk. Chatka Viga is supposed to have a similar color to padauk, but takes longer to darken. How long, I don’t know since I have never worked with Chatka Viga, but I have fallen prey to padauk’s alluring charms before.

As an aside regarding the purpleheart issue, has anyone heard of “cooking” the wood to oxidize it faster and bring out the color? I remember reading somewhere about someone putting purpleheart in an oven on low heat but can’t recall all the details as my last remaining gray cell is having another “moment”.

-- GSY from N. Idaho

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