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Dang it already... :-( Fence problem...

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Forum topic by Milo posted 05-12-2009 08:59 PM 914 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Milo

862 posts in 2073 days


05-12-2009 08:59 PM

I spent the morning lining up and drilling to put the fence on my new unisaw. Everything used, and the previous owner did things bass ackwards.

I used my smaller biesemeyer to estimate everything I did on this one, but I’ll be danged if when it was all said and down the fence itself did ride up a good quarter of an inch or so off the tabletop. I didn’t notice it until I was across the room and looking back at the saw.

Do you think this is going to be a huge problem? I really detest the idea of drilling the caste iron again. I often us a sacrificial fence also…

Any thoughts? Drill again, right? :-(

Thanks,

Dell

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...


17 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

10164 posts in 2509 days


#1 posted 05-12-2009 09:07 PM

A “permanent” sacrificial fence looks like the way to go, to me.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2427 days


#2 posted 05-12-2009 09:11 PM

What fence did you put on the Uni that you had to drill?

View Ben 's profile

Ben

158 posts in 2118 days


#3 posted 05-12-2009 09:21 PM

I recently put a new fence on my table saw. It rides a little high.

This wasn’t a big problem until I went to cross-cut a wide piece of 1/8 inch plywood. I had the fence about 30” to the right, about a foot beyond my right extension table. As I was feeding the plywood through it slipped under the fence and wedged. It caused a pretty nasty kickback and I was lucky I didn’t get hit with the flying lumber. Needless to say I had to take a break from woodworking that day.

So, I would recommend redrilling or flush mounting an auxiliary fence anytime you are cutting thin wood.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2402 days


#4 posted 05-12-2009 09:33 PM

as long as the fence rides smoothly across the table and true to the blade – Id second lew, and go with a permanent auxiliary fence on it.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2575 days


#5 posted 05-12-2009 09:39 PM

Milo, I agree with Lew’s idea. I tried a Delta T2 fence on my Craftsman saw and, like yours, it sat 3/8 of an inch proud of the table. I put a plywood strip on it as a means of getting zero clearance. It worked pretty well. You can attach it to your saw via screws or you can use these clamps if you do not want to drill into your fence. They work pretty well.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

536 posts in 2235 days


#6 posted 05-12-2009 10:03 PM

The idea of using a auxiliary fence is a good idea, but I have an idea that might work. Now I’ve not looked at your setup so I don’t know if it will work, this is just a thought, but, why not widen one of the hole (either in the cast iron top :( or in the aluminum rail) and use a wider washer when you put the bolts in giving you some adjustment room. Sort of like a drawer front. Again, I’ve not tried this, so I don’t know if it’s possible to do what I’m thinking, just thought I’d put it out there and see what everyone thought.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Milo's profile

Milo

862 posts in 2073 days


#7 posted 05-12-2009 10:52 PM

Sorry, the fence is 54” biesemeyer… or 50 something, I forget off the top of my head…

The present sides on the fence are replacements, definatly not original. I suppose I could replace them also.

Chris, are you saying drill the holes in the cast iron larger?

Thanks guys,

Milo

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist's profile (online now)

Greg..the Cajun Wood Artist

5279 posts in 2062 days


#8 posted 05-12-2009 11:02 PM

Another solution would be to buy some 1/4” UHMW and use it as a sacrificial fence attachment. It works great since it is very slippery and reduces friction when using the fence. I have a piece on my fence and recommend it.

-- Each step of every Wood Art project I design and build is considered my masterpiece… because I want the finished product to reflect the quality and creativeness of my work

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

536 posts in 2235 days


#9 posted 05-12-2009 11:04 PM

Either the cast iron or the fence rail. I don’t know if either will accommodate a larger hole. My Unisaw top has about an inch lip coming down in the front, I’m using the Unifence on my saw so there isn’t any room on in the rail for a larger hole. I’m not familiar with how the rail attaches to the saw on a Biesemeyer, but if you can widen those holes instead, I have no doubt it would be easier then the cast iron.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

536 posts in 2235 days


#10 posted 05-12-2009 11:15 PM

Ok, so I’m looking at the user manual for the Biesemeyer fence. And depending on how many screws you’re using, you might be able to get away with just widening the holes on the rail that holds the guide tube (it’s nice to know the actual names of the parts). And drilling the rail might be better, since if it needs to be replaced it’s bound to be less expensive than having to replace the whole top.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Toddmc's profile

Toddmc

30 posts in 2123 days


#11 posted 05-13-2009 06:26 PM

Does anyone know if cross brand fence systems are extremly different? I want to put a rigid table saw fence system on a steel city table saw. Are there certain things I should be aware of before I try this, or is it even possible? Also would the steel city fence I have work with a rigid brand rail system?

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1860 posts in 2314 days


#12 posted 05-13-2009 09:39 PM

I have to ask – Did you check to make sure the fence is adjusted as far down as it goes? Recently I put a Delta T2 fence on a non Delta saw, and their are 6 bolts on the inside of the fence that can be loosened to lower or raise the fence ride height.

-- Joe

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2427 days


#13 posted 05-13-2009 10:43 PM

I’m still trying to figure out why you had to drill, the Bies is built for the Uni hole pattern. Outside of maybe drilling extra holes to help secure the installation you should be able to mount everything with out drilling.

The bottom of the front bracket should be 2 27/32” from the table top. I think the rear rail is 2 25/32

View Milo's profile

Milo

862 posts in 2073 days


#14 posted 05-15-2009 11:26 PM

ajosephg?

Bolts? Where? Can you send me a pix?

Marcb,

For whatever reason (age?) this saw did not match up properly.

Thanks!

Milo

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1860 posts in 2314 days


#15 posted 05-16-2009 12:16 AM

Milo -
Send me a personal message so that we can exchange email addresses, and I’ll send some photos.

-- Joe

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