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If only two, which spoke shaves to buy?

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Forum topic by OxBaker posted 02-21-2015 06:41 PM 755 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OxBaker

11 posts in 655 days


02-21-2015 06:41 PM

I’m ready to start cutting curves. Spoke shaves seem a logical starting point. If you were limited to just two, which would you choose?

-- Tracer rounds work both ways, amigo.


8 replies so far

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1951 days


#1 posted 02-21-2015 06:53 PM

Depends on what you want. Is you budget $200 for two new ones? The sky is the limit.
If you have a $200 budget, it has always been my best bet to buy vintage tools.
No matter what you buy, you’ll have to put an edge on it and you can get five or six for the same cost as two new ones. (I have 5 that I have less than $60 into and I would put them up against the best of today’s versions).

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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OxBaker

11 posts in 655 days


#2 posted 02-21-2015 07:25 PM

The plan is to go vintage. Right now I’m thinking, one concave, one convex, and one flat. Sound appropriate?

-- Tracer rounds work both ways, amigo.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2282 days


#3 posted 02-21-2015 07:33 PM

I’d skip the concave one. They’re basically only useful for making chairlegs or other round parts and I’ve found that I can get almost as good simply taking light facets off with a straight spokeshave. I bought one of the round ones and basically never use it (plus, quite hard to sharpen). So the good news is you only need two, not three (IMO).
Vintage is a good idea. With new you need to get a fairly expensive one to get anything decent, the cheaper ones mostly have a coating (paint?) behind the blade, which makes them chatter unless you file it off to provide a more stable bed for the blade.
It’s possible to replace both the curved and straight ones with a single low-angle spokeshave like http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=44834&cat=1,50230&ap=1 or http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/150740/woodriver-adjustable-spokeshave.aspx
But I have the Veritas one and still haven’t mastered its use at all.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Texcaster

1139 posts in 1138 days


#4 posted 02-21-2015 08:14 PM

I get by with only two. A 151 I’ve ground double convex an a round bottom Veritas. The throat opening of he Veritas is very fine and only for a fine cut. The 151 is wide open and is used for very rough shaping. I need both to build archtop instruments .

Mando in irons.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View OxBaker's profile

OxBaker

11 posts in 655 days


#5 posted 02-22-2015 12:59 AM

Tex, the 151: it was flat on one side before?

I’m hoping to refine a curved edge and carve out a chair seat.

-- Tracer rounds work both ways, amigo.

View Kentucky's profile

Kentucky

10 posts in 666 days


#6 posted 02-22-2015 01:17 AM

Im a big fan of wood spokeshaves like Daves shaves or woodjoy shaves..The boggs shave is also very nice..That said I have a Stanley 151 (early sweetheart) and a 52 (also early sweetheart) that work just wonderfully after a little tuning.

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OxBaker

11 posts in 655 days


#7 posted 02-22-2015 05:22 PM

I’m going with a Stanley 151. I’ll report back on the results later in the week… Or two.

-- Tracer rounds work both ways, amigo.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1139 posts in 1138 days


#8 posted 02-22-2015 08:22 PM


Tex, the 151: it was flat on one side before?

I m hoping to refine a curved edge and carve out a chair seat.

- OxBaker

Ox, yes ground from a flat 151. It didn’t take that long, have a bucket of water handy and keep it cool.

For interlocked grain a second cutter with a filed serrated edge helps to keep tear out at a minimum.

The double convex 151 should work well to fair the seat after rough carving. The handles on the 151 are high enough not to foul on the sides of a bowl like form. The Veritas handles are on the same plane as the cutter and can only be used on outside work.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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