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How do I flatten a 7" board with a 6" jointer?

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Forum topic by douginaz posted 2538 days ago 1513 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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douginaz

220 posts in 2599 days


2538 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: flatten jigs router planer

Hi all, I just perused the past articles and blogs but could not find a way to flatten a 7” board. The way I see it I have several options.
1. Winding sticks? and a hand plane. Sorry but I just don’t get this.
2. Router Jig by making “Sleds” to slide the router on after making a plywood base for the router. Hmmm, Maybe.
3. A planer jig. There has got to be some way to make a sled for my planer that would allow me to shore up the board in question on a piece of flat plywood/mdf and run it through the planer making one side flat. Yes?

I did a pretty good search of the archives and can’t seem to find one.

Anybody know where to find a plan for one or a pic?

Thanks in advance to all you Jocks and Jocketts,
Later,
Doug in AZ.

-- If you need craft books - please visit our small business at http://www.wittywife.com


16 replies so far

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

1973 posts in 3003 days


#1 posted 2538 days ago

short answer: “You Don’t.”

see if this idea helps: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/show/45

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

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Mark A. DeCou

1973 posts in 3003 days


#2 posted 2538 days ago

Just read my topic #45 again. I did pretty good writing that up then, if I do say so.

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

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Mark A. DeCou

1973 posts in 3003 days


#3 posted 2538 days ago

oh, I have done the planer sled method. Little shims taped in place, keeping the board from rocking and moving around. Not near as reliable as I had hoped it would be. I use the router rail method still, I like it better. I suppose those that have good hand planes and eyeballs could do it just fine with winding sticks. Now that I have bifocals to deal with, things like winding sticks always look crooked and bowed to me now. I do imagine a sure sense of pride that is higher with a handplane than the other methods. Course, you could buy a bigger jointer.

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2559 days


#4 posted 2538 days ago

There is a way to use a sled with 4 screws to adjust the board to run it through a planer. I’ve never tried it but someone here has. It would have to be a very special board before I’d go to the bother. If it’s small use winding stick and planes. If it’s real bad throw it in the stove. Either way you’re gonna get warm.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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GaryK

10262 posts in 2585 days


#5 posted 2538 days ago

Mark – I know what you mean about sighting with winding sticks.

I have found that if you put a small hole in a piece of paper and look through it everything will be in focus.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2559 days


#6 posted 2538 days ago

Mark, I think your router rail system might just be the best. I just looked over #45. It certainly looks like a good solution. There is also the concept that if a board is in wind it will just wind more after you straighten it. It’s just simpler for me to go through the whole pile until I get good boards then not leave them around too long. I’m lucky that at High Desert Hardwoods in Eagle , Idaho, Ron lets me dig out the boards that will work for me. Even if I’m getting 100 or 200 I still hand pick each board. I’m also lucky to live in an area where the moisture in the boards averages about 6% in the summer and 8% in the winter. I make allowances for shrinkage and epansion in my pieces because I never know where they will wind up.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View douginaz's profile

douginaz

220 posts in 2599 days


#7 posted 2538 days ago

Hi All, Thanks for that write up Mark. I knew you had one out there, I just couldn’t find it.
I’m working with 6/4 Black Walnut, 7” wide by 45” long. This may not seem to be a special board to you who live in wood rich territory, but here in the wild west it is pretty rare. I have four of these I’m turning into a coffee table top so I want the best finish I can get, that’s why I thought a planer would be worth the trouble. I’m with you on the bifocal thing, I can’t see worth a cr_p any more. When I rock this board on the table saw, one corner raises up 3/16 of an inch. If I flip it over, the other corner comes up the same. So the board does not really have a “high” side, more like it’s twisted. I guess I just pick a side to flatten? I seem to be having a problem getting my head around the procedure.
Thanks for the help fellas.
Later,
Doug in AZ.

-- If you need craft books - please visit our small business at http://www.wittywife.com

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2685 days


#8 posted 2538 days ago

A friend of mine puts it in his CNC router and goes to lunch.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View Greg Mitchell's profile

Greg Mitchell

1381 posts in 2666 days


#9 posted 2538 days ago

If you have a subscription to Fine Woodworking. They have a video of a gentlemen using a planer sled that he built to joint wide boards. Nice looking setup. With a 7” wide board I have pulled the guard off of m 6” wide jointer, and took very light passes turning the board end for end wit each pass. Use a plane to flatten the 1” or so that the jointer could not get too.

-- Greg Mitchell--Lowell, AR--gdamitchell@sbcglobal.net

View Eric Olson's profile

Eric Olson

17 posts in 2547 days


#10 posted 2538 days ago

I know a lot of you will disagree with this, but keep in mind that safety is the priority. I’ve got an 8” jointer and if I need to face joint a piece of stock which is wider than my cutterhead, I remove the guard and make a pass. I flip the board end for end and, keeping the unjointed side flat to the bed, I make another pass which flushes the unjointed side with the jointed side. I do this repeatedly until I get a flat face. Now, keep in mind that my hands DO NOT pass around or over the cutterhead! When approaching the cutterhead, even though it’s completely covered by the stock, I lift my lead hand and place it back on the stock which has already passed the cutterhead. This is followed by my trail hand. I also have a push block for longer stock, which is sculpted to fit my hands and apply even pressure along the length of the stock, keeping my hands even further away from the cutterhead. The same practices are used when using a jointer with a rabbeting ledge, except the fence must cover the cutterhead to the width of the rabbet you’re milling.

-- Eric Olson Springfield, MO Rock Creek Designs

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misch

4 posts in 2539 days


#11 posted 2537 days ago

I’ll echo what Greg said. Fine Wordworking has a great video and an accompanying article on how to make a planer sled to face joint boards wider than your jointer. You do have to have a subscription to access it, but I think I pay $4.99/month for now to access all the content on their website. Well worth it in my opinion.

View Max's profile

Max

55956 posts in 2870 days


#12 posted 2537 days ago

Speaking of making a planer sled, here is a link to a pdf that shows how to make one. It is on the second page of the pdf doc. You can use the adjusting screws as they show or use wedges under the high spots also. . Hope this helps. http://www.woodsmith.com/files/issues/sample/sample-04-05.pdf

-- Max "Desperado", Salt Lake City, UT

View douginaz's profile

douginaz

220 posts in 2599 days


#13 posted 2527 days ago

Hi All, Just as a follow up, I ended up making a planer sled. I used multiple screws up and down the sides to support the wind in the boards. Didn’t take near as long as I thought it would. once I got the adjustments right it only took about three passes to get the boards flat on one side. Thanks to one and all for the advice, links and your shared wisdom.
Later,
Doug in AZ.

-- If you need craft books - please visit our small business at http://www.wittywife.com

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2585 days


#14 posted 2522 days ago

One easy quick way is to remove the guard and just run your board leaving the one inch
hanging off. Make sure that you take all that you need to make it flat because you won’t
be able to make a second pass.

Then run it through the planer on a 6” board under the jointed surface to flatten the other
side. The 1” hanging off un-supported won’t be a problem.

Once done flip it over the clean up the un-jointed 1” and bring it to final thickness.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 2674 days


#15 posted 2522 days ago

Hey Douginaz

I tried the sled method in a couple of pieces of poplar. I too used screws . . . 6 in fact. One on each corner and 2 in the middle. The screws allowed for quick and easy adjustment.

The problem I ran into after that was snipe.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

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