LumberJocks

Atlanta, GA Lumberjocks - chat & meet thread

  • Advertise with us

« back to Coffee Lounge forum

Forum topic by Planeman40 posted 02-20-2015 08:45 PM 680 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


02-20-2015 08:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: atlanta georgia ga

I hope this thread gets some interest. There are a number of us in the Atlanta, GA area scattered all around and very few of us know each other. Hopefully this thread will allow us to get to know one another, swap local wood & tool sources, and maybe be of some help to each other from time to time. Just sign in with your location and tell a little about yourself.

Me, I am Rufus Carswell Sr., I’m 74 years old, and live in the Sandy Springs area of north Atlanta. I have been woodworking (and metal working) since I was an early teenager. I have a very complete woodworking and metalworking shop in my basement.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!


8 replies so far

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3001 days


#1 posted 02-20-2015 10:31 PM

I live in the north Georgia mountains, does that count?

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#2 posted 02-21-2015 12:05 AM

You bet it counts! Do you mind saying where Bruce?

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2410 posts in 1868 days


#3 posted 02-21-2015 05:59 AM

I am Morrow, work in Decatur. Been butchering wood and such since I was a kid with my grandfather.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#4 posted 02-22-2015 01:00 AM

Welcome “woodbutcherbynight”!

I read your home page about financing the shop. I did the same thing beginning back in the 1970s for a good while. A friend of mine, George, worked at a filming company that made television advertising films. He was a hot rodder and often came over to my shop for me to weld things for his car. One day he called me and said they needed a junk sculpture welded up for an ad they were filming for C&S National Bank and wanted to know if I would build it. I didn’t consider myself a sculptor or an artist but he dismissed that and asked if I would do the project and asked what I would charge. Not knowing how much to charge, but thinking $100 plus materials in the back of my mind, I hemmed and hawed. Finally my friend said “We have $500 as the budget, would you do it for that?” I said “You have yourself a junk sculpture!”. A few months later George called and wanted something else. These projects appeared about every two or three months for the next three or four years and ran from $500 to $5000 or more and were VERY profitable. The down side was you were never sure how you were going to accomplish some of them as they were pretty wild – like a flying saucer coming in from outer space and landing in a farm field and a water heater appearing out of it to a mockup of the inside of a music box showing a C&S National Bank charge card being played to a pre-recorded tune as part of the workings. There was always a time crunch for delivery too. I spent quite a few sleepless nights doing this as part time work while tending to my regular job. But it made good money and paid for most of the shop I now have.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2410 posts in 1868 days


#5 posted 02-22-2015 03:18 AM

I would do more work were it not for those that think I snap my fingers and make it happen overnight. It is rare that anyone understands that this is a hobby and I am rather particular about how things are done. Just to make a cabinet drawer is one nights work and maybe stain, then several days of poly, dry, sand, poly, repeat until nice finish is achieved. I got a new miter saw in early December and have just completed all the details to the top of the cabinet for that. New fence with drawers underneath, cabinets behind for extra storage. All that takes a tremendous amount of time as you work through small details that add up in time on the project. Currently I am working on the cabinet below which after 10 years I figure is about time it got drawers and some proper storage space for scraps. Last night I got all the drawers assembled and fitted with 100lb drawer slides then took it back down and prepped for stain. Forgot to check I had satin, and did not so that gets done tomorrow. Another week of poly, sanding and waiting for it to dry. Tomorrow I get the day to work on the other half of the cabinet getting it sectioned off and framed out. No rush I have till I am dead to get it done right? (laughing)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#6 posted 02-22-2015 03:36 AM

Yeah, most individual people have no idea of what it takes timewise to do most projects. I found that professional people in medium to larger firms have been through these kind of things enough to know what custom one-of-a kinds cost. Non professional individuals are used to buying mass produced items that Chinese production has lowered even more. You can’t compete in this area. You have to go where the money is, either with wealthy clientele or build for people like architects and the like. I have done a good bit of work with architectural firms and they know what custom work costs. After working on a personal project for over two years off and on, I showed it to a good friend who admired it and said “you ought to build these and sell them” to which I replied “would you pay $15,000 for that?”. He was stunned. I then told him roughly how many hours I had in it and he shook his head. They just don’t realize and understand.

I am now retired and work only for my personal enjoyment. I spend most of my days in the shop where its nice and peaceful. : ) A year ago I wanted a nice set of carving tools. I had a few I had collected over the years but never a complete set. Due to the cost of new tools, I made my own from 31 black rough socket handle type forgings . I ground, polished, and sharpened them and turned the handles from some Purpleheart I had in stock. They all have a razor edge and are a pleasure to work with. I also made a set of six carving knives with Cocobolo handles. I am presently using these to do some wood carving. I also ground, polished and sharpened 31 smaller tang type carving gouges. I haven’t turned the handles yet. I need to get a couple of lingering projects finished and then I will finish off these gouges, probably beginning next Fall.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2410 posts in 1868 days


#7 posted 02-24-2015 04:24 AM

I spent all day yesterday in the shop working on putting in dividers under a cabinet. Right before I am about to get a can of finish out a I heard a hissing noise and look up to see a crack in my shop air line. Had to stop, hit the valve for the air and take a look. Of course I had all but one piece to fix the repair at the time. (Laughing) Left the air off for the night, did my poly work and called it a decent day.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#8 posted 02-24-2015 07:27 PM

That reminds me of when I began putting my shop back in order after a roughly 10 year pause in using due to advancing osteoarthritis in my knees which made it painful to stand or use the stairs.. I finally had my knees replaced and was able to get back in the shop. I found that a number of things made of rubber were beginning to deteriorate. This was around 2005 and most of the “rubber” things were purchased in the late 1960s to mid 1970s. First was the rubber air hose on the air compressor. Then the heavy electrical leads on the Hobart stick arc welder, and soon after the hose on my oxy-aceteline welder. It was a shock to think I had lived long enough to have this happening! : ) After replacing all of these I began inspecting all of the wiring and rubber on everything in the shop. Thank God everything else was in good shape. But I still keep an eye out for bad rubber and wiring.

And you mention ” Of course I had all but one piece to fix the repair at the time”. Have you ever noticed when it comes to nuts and bolts – and sometimes screws – no matter how many thousands of nuts, bolts, and screws you have, you always need something you haven’t got!!!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com