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MXBON cyanoacrylate glue for wood?

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Forum topic by FrankLad posted 05-10-2009 04:55 AM 9844 views 6 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


05-10-2009 04:55 AM

Topic tags/keywords: glue cyanoacrylate super glue wood ring wood rings bentwood question

Hey guys!

I currently use Gorilla Glue for my wearable wooden rings, particularly the ones that are built up from several layers of wood and cut out.

However, for the bentwood rings I am looking into cyanoacrylate / “super” glues. Today I tried the Gorilla brand super glue, and found it so much more convenient for gluing up the bentwood rings, and for intricate inlay work. When doing this type of work with the regular poly Gorilla glue, clamping posed a problem, due to the nature of bentwood rings (not as easy as clamping flat pieces of wood, as in the built-up rings). With the super glue, I can simply squeeze the wood parts with my fingers (gloves on, of course… ha ha) and a surprisingly strong bond is achieved in half a minute. My first bentwood ring built with this super glue felt super strong.

The problem I have is that the Gorilla super glue is not waterproof like the regular poly glue. Granted, I don’t market my wood rings to scuba divers – and I discourage excessive water contact – but I prefer to overbuild and err on the side of caution.

So I did a bit of Googling and discovered MXBON, which can be purchased from UtopiaTools.com. From what I read about it being water proof and resistant to high temperatures, it looks like just the ticket. But before I order the stuff (it ain’t the cheapest glue in the world), I wanted to see if anyone here has had experience with it.

Thanks for any help or info!

Frank

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com


19 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#1 posted 05-10-2009 06:43 AM

Hey Frank
Good find ,sorry haven’t used it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View LesB's profile

LesB

1235 posts in 2903 days


#2 posted 05-10-2009 07:58 AM

I assume when you say you have been using Gorilla Glue you mean urethane glue.

I haven’t used that brand (MXBON) but I assumed all cyanoacrylate are “water” proof. Have you tested any of it in water? If it is not water proof what fails, the bond with the wood? The glue itself is like plastic when it sets up.
Cyanoacrylate is brittle so it may fail from a shock if someone bangs the wooden rings against something. Also my understanding of the quality (and cost) of cyanoacrylate has to do with the distillation process used to make it. Cheaper ones are less pure, ergo probably not as good??
They glue jet airplanes together. Wouldn’t it be great to get some of that glue?

-- Les B, Oregon

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


#3 posted 05-10-2009 05:51 PM

a1Jim: I hadn’t heard about it until just recently. They have quite a selection, for various applications.

LesB: Correct, I have been (and plan to keep using) the regular Gorilla urethane glue for the built-up rings. I think it is great for that. The glue foaming/expansion seems to penetrate the pores and there is no question that it is waterproof.

The Gorilla Super Glue formula mentions that it uses rubber particles to help with impact/shock. Seems like a few of the brands are offering this nowadays with the concern of the joint being brittle, as you pointed out.

I decided to test that ring last night by leaving it in a ziplock bag of water. Just as structurally sound as ever this morning. Wasn’t squishy, in other words – felt very stiff when squeezed.

So… the Gorilla Super Glue may actually work. If the ring passes the left-in-pants-pocket-and-thrown-in-washing-machine test, then I’ll be convinnced.

I’ll post back with further results.

Thanks, guys!

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

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FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


#4 posted 05-12-2009 03:02 AM

The ring survived the washing machine test. Held up as if nothing happened, just came out wet. :-)

BUT that’s not all! I decided to take it a step further and subjected it to the left-in-pants-pocket-and-thrown-in-DRYER test. Wanted to see how it would hold up to the heat + friction.

Again, came out just fine! This was with no finish applied; just the raw wood. I’ll also try a couple with the different finishes we use, to see how they behave.

I also did an inlay on a ring today, carefully cutting a design into a ring and filling it with the glue plus some contrasting fine sawdust. Sanded over it all once cured and really liked the results. After I get a finish applied (takes a few days), I’ll upload it to the gallery.

Went ahead and ordered some MXBON 105 from UtopiaTools (quick plug for them: Spoke with a very nice representative named Seth who was knowledgeable about MXBON and cyanoacrylates in general. Also, my order shipped not long after it was placed.) I’m looking forward to trying that MXBON as well.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#5 posted 05-12-2009 05:10 AM

Are you saying the Gorilla Super Glue seems to be good enough?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


#6 posted 05-12-2009 03:10 PM

It does seem to work very well. At least it survived what I put it through (overnight water submerge, washing machine, dryer).

But I did go ahead and order the MXBON. From what I read, it is a more ‘pure’ adhesive (solvents are distilled) and has other working qualities that I like (longer shelf life, for one).

I’ll put it through the same testing procedure, plus some. :)

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View FEDSAWDAVE's profile

FEDSAWDAVE

293 posts in 2892 days


#7 posted 05-12-2009 07:10 PM

From one cyanoacrylate to another(same viscosity)...super glue is super glue. The main differance? Marketing.

-- David, Tools4solidsurface.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3133 days


#8 posted 05-12-2009 07:45 PM

Its all 1 of 2 different formulations with all the same properties. 4 Formulations if you take into account the ones just for skin gluing.

Shelf life would depend on the presence of water which causes the actual glue to set. So leave the cap off and you get a rock hard tube.

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3410 days


#9 posted 05-12-2009 08:01 PM

FEDSAWDAVE… you are mostly correct. There are many variants of cyanoacrylate adhesives.
(even in the same viscosity ranges) I use over 13 variants at work in the automotive OEM glass industry. Many variants contain additives to extend open time or to improve bonding to non-porous surfaces or smooth glass. Issues can occur with these different types of adhesives such a “whitening” of your visible surface.

Franklad.. if you have any problems with the wood bonding, wipe the contact surfaces with a wet cloth before bonding. You may also want to fill the pores on the wood prior to bonding. This will give you a better surface for bonding with the “super” glues.

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FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


#10 posted 05-12-2009 08:53 PM

Thanks for all the info, guys!

Tearen: So far, the bond seems to be quite strong. I did read that Baking Soda makes a good filler. But I guess I could also use sawdust… particularly if matching colors/wood.

I’m used to damping the wood for Gorilla Glue (regular poly type), but was concerned with damping the wood when used with the super glues – as far as getting the wood too damp. Thoughts?

I’ve heard that super glue (particularly the gel type) can be used for inlay work where epoxy would normally be used. I’ll be trying a bunch more inlay work and testing that in the near future.

Thanks again, guys!

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3410 days


#11 posted 05-12-2009 08:59 PM

Super glues use the moisture to begin and speed up the bonding process. You don’t need that much… remember, the moisture on your fingers in enough to cause a reaction. So, I would only use enough to change surface color of the wood. If is really humid outside, you probably would not even need to wet the wood…

View FEDSAWDAVE's profile

FEDSAWDAVE

293 posts in 2892 days


#12 posted 05-12-2009 09:06 PM

Agreed Tearin. I saw an on line ad for a super glue with “new space age polymers” LOL hence the advertising differance between some cyanoacrylates.

To alleviate “whitening”, you’ll need to ask for what is called a low-odor non-bloom super glue that will dry clear. A lot of granite shops will use that for small repairs. It is a higher price that conventional super glue.

-- David, Tools4solidsurface.com

View FEDSAWDAVE's profile

FEDSAWDAVE

293 posts in 2892 days


#13 posted 05-13-2009 03:05 AM

Always try and buy a super glue, no matter the bottle size with a needled cap. The better brands will have this so after you cut the spout and use, the needle in the cap will keep the port open but sealed.

-- David, Tools4solidsurface.com

View FrankLad's profile

FrankLad

273 posts in 2769 days


#14 posted 05-13-2009 09:12 PM

Thanks for the info on cyanoacrylates, guys! I’ve learned a lot about “super glue” the past few days. :)

The MXBON arrived today, so I’m looking forward to trying it.

It doesn’t appear that the 105, which I ordered, falls under the “low odor, low blooming” series. This should be fine for basic wood bonding, but I may check out those others for crushed stone inlays and such, where I’d want a clear finish similar to how epoxy inlays are done.

-- Frank, Mississippi, Original Bentwood Rings - http://www.bentwoodrings.com

View BlackBearBladeworks's profile

BlackBearBladeworks

1 post in 2744 days


#15 posted 05-30-2009 12:56 PM

Hello Lumberjocks My name is Bill and I am a Custom Knife Maker from Maine and I use a LOT of different adhesives!!! And I can tell you that MXBON is the highest quality Cyanoacrylic Adhesive made PERIOD!!! I would avoid the thin stuff simply because it is TOO thin, just a tip of the bottle without a special tip (Utopia Tools send about 6 free with every bottle and they are the best tips I have used as well) Another Super High Quality CA glue is Hyperbond. It is MUCH less costly as well (3X2oz. bittles for $16) I use the thick for 75% of my gluing tasks but when I have to go with the “best” MXBon can NOT be Beat …... Hope This helps ….BK;~)

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