LumberJocks

Trying to match finish for furniture repair

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Babieca posted 02-19-2015 09:41 PM 650 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Babieca's profile

Babieca

120 posts in 964 days


02-19-2015 09:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing

I am making a replacement foot for a dresser in my parents’ bedroom and I need some help getting a finish that will be an acceptable match.

The new foot is poplar. I have no idea what kind of wood the old foot is, but it isn’t fine furniture. The finish is pretty much opaque.

Suggestions for the color would be helpful, but I need to know how to do the whole finish. Is it a glaze? Shellac? Lots of dark wax.

Thanks ahead of time for your help.


10 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

623 posts in 1412 days


#1 posted 02-19-2015 09:53 PM

Trying to match and old finish like that can be a real challenge, especially for any finish that allows the grain to show through. Depending on the actual piece, one possibility is to make a full set of replacement feet. Slight differences in the coloration or finish can be made to look like a design detail. From the looks of the original you show, something very dark could look nice.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#2 posted 02-19-2015 09:55 PM

java

Looks like a good starting point, then tweak with mixol colors on a test board

You want a starting color that if not perfect is “lighter” and ‘warmer’ (redder) than the final. Like cutting wood. lightening a dark stain is a tough call.

but also it is easier to take something too red, and tweak with a little bit of green…. to brown it up more.
Going the other way takes a LOT of red to pull a too cool color into the right shade

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#3 posted 02-19-2015 10:13 PM

Here’s a crazy idea but it works.You take roof patch(yes I said roof patch) and thin it with mineral spirits. The more you thin it the lighter brown the stain is,experiment with a scrap of wood until you get the right color by using the right amount of coats or by how much thinking you do or both. Beleave it or not most brown stains have the same base as roof patch. After it’s dry top coat it like any stain.
Try it you’ll like it :)

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#4 posted 02-19-2015 10:21 PM

Also, something i did with my oldest for helping to select the color for his oak dresser… he wanted it darker.

Varathane wood stains sells (True Value here ) samples…. the size of a ketchup packet It is enough to stain up to an 8X8 inch area. here they sell for 45 cents. So for 2 bucks you can take 3-4 ‘candidates’ and get yourself close.

For working with poplar where you are starting almost white…., I would stain or dye it to get close first before i did the thinned roofing tar to darken it. but there are hundreds of ways to get where you want to go.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#5 posted 02-19-2015 10:38 PM

I’ve had good luck using Varathane Dark Walnut to match items similar to what you posted.

Great advice above and practice on scrap pieces and you’ll get it to compliment your
piece.

View Babieca's profile

Babieca

120 posts in 964 days


#6 posted 02-20-2015 01:28 AM

Those samples are exactly what I need. I haven’t seen them before. The closest True-Value is 30 miles away. Know of anywhere else that carries them?

If I don’t find one that works, maybe I’ll move on to roof patch.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#7 posted 02-20-2015 04:50 PM


Those samples are exactly what I need. I haven t seen them before. The closest True-Value is 30 miles away. Know of anywhere else that carries them?

If I don t find one that works, maybe I ll move on to roof patch.

- Babieca


Menards big box also has them.- but Menards is just midwest.

I would go to the Varathane website (they are part of Rustoleum) but there shoudl be a spot to find retailers where you put in your zipcode, and it spits out a list.

I go to true value for this kind of stuff, as our local store actually has a woodworking section, a small hardware store feel, and they are much closer than Menards.

if you only have to stain that one bracket foot, you can probably just buy 2 or 3 packets and complete the project!

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#8 posted 02-20-2015 05:14 PM

Use a pre-stain conditioner (usually just diluted shellac). Start with shellac seal coat mixed 50/50 with denatured alcohol. Brush that on and let it dry.
Then stain on a sample board with a 50/50 mixture of General finishes Antique Walnut and Java. That will get you close. Adjust your ratio until the color is a match.
Finally apply your topcoat, such as shellac or lacquer. Choose a satin or “hand rubbed” sheen for best effect.
Make a sample board like this to dial in the color you want.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#9 posted 02-20-2015 11:29 PM

I would also add that if you are pretty close on the bench…. in bright light.

Set it on the floor next to the original foot (vertical position as it will be installed).... and step back.

It is a repair job, not an exhibity at the smithsonian art museum.

You will find that under glancing light, on the floor, rather than on the bench…. your repair looks better an better

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#10 posted 02-21-2015 02:28 AM

The most foolproof method is to sneak up on the color with a multiple step process. Start with a conditioner since it is poplar. Follow with a water-based dye to get the underlying color. Next step is an oil stain which darkens the color to get it closer.

If the piece is still the wrong color, you can move on to glaze or toner or both. I usually do toners to make minor changes to the hue or to make things slightly darker.

Doing the above seems like a lot of work but if it’s just one small project, then it’s actually quicker then trying to get the perfect pre-mixed stain.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com