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Forum topic by SG6578 posted 02-18-2015 11:49 PM 860 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SG6578

35 posts in 678 days


02-18-2015 11:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planing lumber walnut oak ash

Hello all,

I visited a guy last night who rough cuts lumber with his woodmizer mill. He had an enormous inventory but most of it was buried and not easily accessible. It was 8F outside and none of the buildings had heat so I dug up a few boards and got the hell out of there. Took about 15 minutes to get the feeling back in my hands but I was like a kid in candy store. He had some 16/4 slabs of a 150 year old mulberry tree he sawed a few years ago. It was a dark red that would put any mahogany to shame.

I dug out a 4/4 black walnut board 8” wide x 8’ long. For $30 and it planed out beautifully with 95% heartwood on one side. SCORE. Cut 10 years ago. Air dried.

Got a $3 walnut plaque. Is this a diagonal but off a branch or a cut from a burl? Air dried.

Also grabbed a 13” wide x 44” long 6/4 ash board for $20. I noticed lots of light spots on it though that would not plane out. Is this water damage or a disease in the tree? Air dried.

This new DeWalt 735 is paying for itself quickly.

Thanks for your help,

Kevin


7 replies so far

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SG6578

35 posts in 678 days


#1 posted 02-18-2015 11:50 PM

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Randy_ATX

835 posts in 1909 days


#2 posted 02-19-2015 12:19 AM

I love air dried wood. Nice score. I would go back and get some mulberry – post a pic of that if you do.
I’d also like to hear what others think about your light spots on that ash. I’ve got some air dried ash but it doesn’t have those markings on it.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#3 posted 02-19-2015 01:26 AM

Go back and see if you can find any quartersawn mulberry. All mulberry is beautiful but QS is spectacular!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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SG6578

35 posts in 678 days


#4 posted 02-19-2015 01:53 AM

There was some quarter sawn.

He had a 4” thick x 10” wide by approx 70” long piece and he wanted $100 for it. I have never seen any wood just POP that much in my life. I am regretting passing it up but will try to get out there and pick it up this weekend.

There was some minor checking but no major cracks. He also had some enormous burly cherry book matched slabs also 4 inches thick. I would estimate at 30” wide. Some of the largest cherry pieces I’ve ever seen. I didn’t ask the price but he was attached to them.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#5 posted 02-19-2015 02:10 AM

I think that the light spots in the ash are the beginning of white rot. The wood can still be sound, but the beginning phases of the rot will create those light streaks and spots.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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SG6578

35 posts in 678 days


#6 posted 02-19-2015 03:45 AM

Do you think the rot was forming when it was cut or after? The reason for asking is that I do not know when that piece was cut and Im wondering if it’s a good idea to let sit a while.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#7 posted 02-19-2015 12:44 PM

It happened before the log was sawn into boards. Sawing the log into boards stopped the process as the boards immediately began to dry, and the rot requires high moisture.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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