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Tools required to make a 3" wood disc.

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Forum topic by TinMan2000 posted 1905 days ago 3047 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TinMan2000

1 post in 1914 days


1905 days ago

Hello,

I am new to woodworking and would like to ask the woodworking community for some advice. Your respond is greatly appreciated.

I need to create a 3.0” circular wood disc. The disc thickness is only 0.25”. What are the tools I need to safely create the disc?

Thank you in advance!

TinMan2000


14 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

9945 posts in 2354 days


#1 posted 1905 days ago

I would use a circle cutting jig on my bandsaw (1/4” or 3/8”) blade.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2125 days


#2 posted 1905 days ago

lew has the best method. There are others, use a drill press with a hole saw and remove the drill bit in the center and slowly feed into the wood. or… cut with a jig saw or hand saw and hand sand. or… you can use a router with a circle jig.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2363 days


#3 posted 1905 days ago

( Use a drill press with a hole saw and remove the drill bit in the center and slowly feed into the wood ) Great advise, NOT !

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2176 days


#4 posted 1905 days ago

If you don’t have the previously mentioned tools . Draw a 3” circle with a compass cut it out with a jig saw leaving the line and then sand to the line or use a file to bring it into shape. This is the hard way.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View RedShirt013's profile

RedShirt013

219 posts in 2260 days


#5 posted 1905 days ago

Does the disc have to be perfectly round? What tools do you have?

It’s much harder if you don’t want a hole in the center.

You could make a circular template with a hole saw or a router, then use a router to route a 3” inner diameter circle groove about 3/8” deep into a 5/8” thick piece. Then kinda like resawing cut the disc out on the bandsaw.

-- Ed

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2125 days


#6 posted 1905 days ago

( Use a drill press with a hole saw and remove the drill bit in the center and slowly feed into the wood ) Great advise, NOT !

Woodchuck1957 is right, this is not a good way. This is how I had to make wooden disks when I had nothing else to work with not even a jig saw.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View wdkits1's profile

wdkits1

211 posts in 1952 days


#7 posted 1905 days ago

I would use a scroll saw

-- Mike --www.midlothianwoodworks.com

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 1952 days


#8 posted 1905 days ago

( Use a drill press with a hole saw and remove the drill bit in the center and slowly feed into the wood ) Great advise, NOT !

Do it all the time on my DP. With a sacrificial piece of wood underneath and both securely clamped to the table and the table securely locked in position.

What’s the problem?

Depending on how nice a finish I want on the edge without having to sand it and risk it then being under size in that case I use a router with a circle jig, and lean towards that method if I want a nice edge.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2363 days


#9 posted 1905 days ago

If any of you actually did that, you’d know what the problem is. And then you suggest it to a newbie that has very little, if any drill press experience ?

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 1952 days


#10 posted 1905 days ago

“If any of you actually did that, you’d know what the problem is”

I think think I said I do it all the time.

Once I wanted to cut a half circle, with the drill in mind you, and during a momentary lapse of reason, did not clamp the wood down. Six stitches in my thumb later I was back with it clamped down. I was stupid and in a hurry, but if not for that it can be done.

So having the drill in or out, there is still risk. Firmly clamping the wood down mitigates some of the risk and I clearly stated, “securely clamped down and table locked”.

I’ve cut 4” disc’s using a hole saw this way.

Did I indicate there was no risk? No. You take a risk every time you turn on a machine, but you work safely to mitigate the risks.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

525 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 1905 days ago

I’ve used a hole saw in the drill press without the pilot bit to cut circles out of 1/4” stock. I didn’t even use a clamp, I did use a fence though, and it was a long piece of wood wo I had plenty of wood to grip, however, I would suggest a clamp if the piece is less then 10” long. If the speed of the drill press is slow enough (I say less then 550 RPM) and you pull down with easy pressure, there shouldn’t be any problems. I say practice to get the feel of it, and if it makes you nervious, use a saw (jig, band or scroll, what ever the case may be) and sand it to your final size.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2363 days


#12 posted 1905 days ago

Amazeing.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 1992 days


#13 posted 1905 days ago

simple. Find the material with the right thickness.
Grab a Coping saw and cut the circle by hand. Finish with sand paper.
Power tools for small things like this are messy and dangerous.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 1952 days


#14 posted 1905 days ago

“Amazeing”

Yes indeed’y is it amazing. A simple fast way to cut out perfect circles every time!

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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