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Forum topic by beaufish posted 05-07-2009 05:27 AM 6895 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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beaufish

12 posts in 2204 days


05-07-2009 05:27 AM

Hello All. Noob question here.

Glue roller? What does everybody use to roll out glue flat and smooth? Watching Tv and podcasts the woodworkers seem to be using a small wooden roller on a wire frame. I didn’t seem to be able to find this on the Woodcraft or Rockler websites. Closest thing I can find to what they use is a fondant roller you can pick up in most craft stores. It looks like it should work. I picked up one today. planning on putting some paste wax on the roller to help clean up after glue up. Are these fondant rollers what fellow LJ’s use?


24 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2576 days


#1 posted 05-07-2009 12:09 PM

Here is what I use when I need to roll out glue on large flat areas. For edges I generally just use a finger to spread the bead out.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View dustmaker's profile

dustmaker

38 posts in 2201 days


#2 posted 05-07-2009 03:18 PM

Woodcraft has a roller. The part number is 148363. I use one and works well. You can,t store the glue in it. You have to clean it out after you get done.

-- Dustmaker, Kansas

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2428 days


#3 posted 05-07-2009 03:22 PM

Yeah I just picked up something similar a while back. Very nice. Prior to that was just a glue bottle and some brushes, but for long pieces or multipiece lamination thats a big pain and sometimes eats up too much of the open time.

View lew's profile

lew

10166 posts in 2509 days


#4 posted 05-07-2009 03:57 PM

I have one similar to Scott’s (just the roller- no extra attachments). I used to use it a lot but now either use my finger or an acid brush (just don’t forget to clean it).

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2281 days


#5 posted 05-07-2009 04:24 PM

I use a mason’s adhesive trowel.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View Bovine's profile

Bovine

114 posts in 2082 days


#6 posted 05-07-2009 04:34 PM

My wife likes to make crafts and cards with paper. She has a little ink roller that she got from a craft store. I’m happy to say that she didn’t “misplace” it, but I have one too. Works great and they’re cheap. For the people in the US, you can get them at Hobby Lobby, Michaels, etc.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112941 posts in 2331 days


#7 posted 05-07-2009 04:50 PM

I use to use one but found I just get a quicker job using a bondo spreader.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2596 posts in 2187 days


#8 posted 05-07-2009 05:12 PM

foam brush…works fine…very primitive!

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2420 posts in 2192 days


#9 posted 05-07-2009 05:24 PM

I pick up a package of those multi sized foam paintbrushes at the dollar store. I keep a bowl of water to put them in between jobs. They work pretty good and when just wet also help to clean squeeze-out off the wood.

for wood edges I just can’t help but finger spread it.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Greg Wurst's profile

Greg Wurst

783 posts in 2587 days


#10 posted 05-07-2009 05:49 PM

Best glue roller I’ve used:

http://www.veneersupplies.com/product_info.php?cPath=86_37&products_id=1096

They also have a 6” model:

http://www.veneersupplies.com/product_info.php?cPath=86_37&products_id=382

Great for veneers, but I’ve used them for anything that needs a large amount of glue applied evenly.

-- You're a unique and special person, just like everyone else.

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 2107 days


#11 posted 05-07-2009 10:43 PM

Scott, I have that one too. When I’ve used it I find that the roller doesn’t always roll. It spins freely by itself, but what ever it’s made out of is too hard thus it doesn’t roll that well. I’ve always thought that if it were made of a softer compound it would work better.

Greg, those look nice, do they roll well? For yellow glue?

What I’ve been doing lately is use old credit cards and the fake ones they send you with an application when I have a large area to spread glue on. Some are cardboard which I use once and discard, but the plastic ones I clean up and use again and again.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Frankie Talarico Jr.'s profile

Frankie Talarico Jr.

353 posts in 2111 days


#12 posted 05-07-2009 10:47 PM

go to home cheapo and but the tiny roller with a plastic tray for $4.00( the ones with the red handle. All plastic) and wash it every use and it’ll last 5 yrs.

-- Live by what you believe, not what they want you to believe.

View Greg Wurst's profile

Greg Wurst

783 posts in 2587 days


#13 posted 05-07-2009 10:51 PM

BlankMan – Yes, they work great for yellow glue. It’s amazing how smooth and even they allow you to spread the glue.

-- You're a unique and special person, just like everyone else.

View edjellisjr's profile

edjellisjr

4 posts in 1426 days


#14 posted 11-22-2011 06:07 AM

Just got done gluing up a project with the infamous Glue Bottle Roller ($10 with roller and biscuit attachments at SEARS). Second one I’ve bought. The first was thrown out because cleanup was impossible. Figured I would give it another try. CLEAN UP . . . . Wiped off all the excess glue with wet paper towel . . . . Let dry . . . . Then used 0000 Steel Wool on the wheel. NO DAMAGE. Like new. The wheel also pops right off with a little help from a screw driver for even EASIER Clean Up.

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1949 days


#15 posted 11-22-2011 09:36 AM

Usually use an acid brush with about half of the length of the bristles cut off. That works on narrow surfaces and getting glue into biscuit slots as well as the biscuits.

For large areas have plastic card gizmo with various sizes notches on each of three sides and flat on fourth side, something like a miniature tile cement tool.

Had the Craftsman but, was a piece of crap and more trouble than help.

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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