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Just Got My 1st Table Saw...now what do I need

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Forum topic by WillWilson posted 02-16-2015 07:05 PM 1524 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WillWilson

18 posts in 658 days


02-16-2015 07:05 PM

I’ve been wanting to get into woodworking for sometime, but I was holding off on getting a table saw until I came across the right deal. Well yesterday, I ran across a Craigslist add for a, brand new, Bosch 4100-09 for $400. I did a quick search and saw that I would be saving $200, so I bought it.

I’ve been lurking on here for a while now and I know that a lot of people recommend a cabinet saw, but I got the Bosch. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for add on’s to this saw. I was thinking about a new miter gauge.


26 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 02-16-2015 07:24 PM

Why don’t you just actually use the thing and then figure out what you might want/need? Everyone is different and use their tools for different purposes.. you need to figure out what you want to use it for, see what feels comfortable and what you might want to make things work better for you. Not everyone needs a particular gadget or gizmo.. you need to determine that. About the only universal is a push stick.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#2 posted 02-16-2015 07:28 PM

Get a decent blade. Maybe a diablo combo from ye olde bigge boxxe store.

Get ye some wood. Doe some cutting.

WAIT YOUUL CUT YOUR HAND OFF LIKE THAT WHAT ARE YOU THINKING

Okay… Read up on safety. Make a crosscut sled. Read up on safety. Practice technique. (Assuming here that you haven’t had much experience on the table saw. Forgive me if I’m wrong)

But anyhoo…. Read up on safety, and keep your hands away from the blade, and your body out of alignment with the blade.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 02-16-2015 07:32 PM

A good blade is one the most notable upgrades you can add. Getting things really well lined up is another.

The ABCs of Table Saws

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 798 days


#4 posted 02-16-2015 07:33 PM

Push sticks and eye protection and hearing protection. But first set up the saw. Make sure the fence is parallel or slightly open to the blade (a couple thousand over). Kick backs are dangerous. Make sure the splitter and blade guard work well and don’t bind the wood. Read up on table saw technique. Set up the miter gauge for 90 degree cross cuts. Have fun but be safe.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

728 posts in 2527 days


#5 posted 02-16-2015 07:34 PM

Find the manual and read it cover to cover…repeat. Adjust the saw as outlined and do test cutting to become familiar with the saw. Then decide what you want to build, what you can afford, and what you need. But as said, get a good blade. It will be money well spent to buy a good Freud or other mid price level blade. You don’t need top of the line now, but you will learn by reading reviews and on line articles and woodworking books. Also, you can learn a lot from right here. But, make safety your #1 priority. If you start to do something and it feels dangerous, then it probably is. Eye and ear protection and push sticks etc are priorities. Have fun.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3663 posts in 1727 days


#6 posted 02-17-2015 02:22 AM

I concur with Brad. You bought it, use the thing. Build something or try to and screw up a lot and often. Start with a small box, a shelf for the shop nothing to difficult. Then your off and running. You got ideas, your only limited by your imagination. Go forth and conquer!!!

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 885 days


#7 posted 02-17-2015 02:50 AM

grripper. especially because the table is small.

View WillWilson's profile

WillWilson

18 posts in 658 days


#8 posted 02-17-2015 02:51 AM

Thanks for all the feedback. I will definitely be getting be getting a new blade. I was in Lowes earlier, but the only blades I saw were DeWalt. I was looking for the Diablo because I have heard good things about them.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1537 days


#9 posted 02-17-2015 03:00 AM

I have a bosch saw and it’s served me well. The first thing I’d suggest buying is a good book explaining table saws and safety. There is no room for error when it comes to a table saw. Then get what you need to cut safely. Then start using it. This is not one of those ‘just plug it in and give it a go’ things.

Good luck. You’ll find lots of good advice and inspiration here.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#10 posted 02-17-2015 03:01 AM

Think of something to build. Then proceed to butcher it and have some fun in the process.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View eatsawdust's profile

eatsawdust

35 posts in 1724 days


#11 posted 02-17-2015 03:14 AM

I just got a pair of Grippers and sharp blades are important, watch a few table saw safety vids on youtube don’t do anything stupid, learn when to use a fence vs miter gauge, never freehand cut anything.

-- Why does everything I enjoy doing have to be bad for the environment, I work in the oil industry and enjoy working with exotic woods from rain forests

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 886 days


#12 posted 02-17-2015 03:57 AM

You definitely want a tool that will allow you to set up the saw, blade, and fence as accurately as possible.

Here is what I use. There are other designs but this one is fool proof. Others have problems with fitting the miter slot.

It can be found here.

A right angle gauge will help you insure the fence is perpendicular to the table top and the tool below will make sure the fence and the blade are parallel to one another.

The only other tool I find really helpful is a Wixey Digital Angle gauge to check the fence and the blade for perpendicular, and any other angle you need to set for the blade.

As others have suggested, a good combination blade is a good investment. I use a Freud Premier Fusion blade. Great blade for the price with excellent performance.

A zero clearance insert plate with a micro jig splitter is a good safety item, if your saw does not have a riving knife.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2406 days


#13 posted 02-17-2015 04:55 AM

For add-on’s, the first thing I’d have, before a sled or anything, is a stack of push SHOES.

I would make them capable of running past the splitter, so some would be 3/4” thick, some 3/8” or 1/4” and a few 1/8”.

As well, the heels would be different depths so they’d just skim over the surface of different thicknesses of materials. This allows you to run the push shoe through the blade and still push narrow pieces through, if need be.

These are your best friends for safety. They should be tall enough you’d have no qualms about running them through the blade and keeping your hand away from it.

Add good blades, insuring the blade and fence are parallel to the miter guides (a tri-square can do this) and using the/a splitter and you should still have all ten forty years from now (kick backs will be minimal).

Now days, I rely on my cabinet saw. I sold my Bosch because I retired and don’t do site work anymore, but it was a damn good saw (sold it for $400.00, but it was the non-riving knife type). It gave me good cuts and the fence was good enough for most cuts. When I needed precision, I set it with this:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/65954

If you make one, it will set any saw up as good as the dial versions do (you can set it so you cannot get a 1/1000 feeler gauge between it and the blade or fence.

View WillWilson's profile

WillWilson

18 posts in 658 days


#14 posted 02-17-2015 01:47 PM



grripper. especially because the table is small.

- jacquesr

I plan on getting the Gripper, but one thing that worried me is the fact that it seemed like I would have to take off the blade guard to use it.

View WillWilson's profile

WillWilson

18 posts in 658 days


#15 posted 02-17-2015 01:49 PM



You definitely want a tool that will allow you to set up the saw, blade, and fence as accurately as possible.

Here is what I use. There are other designs but this one is fool proof. Others have problems with fitting the miter slot.

It can be found here.

A right angle gauge will help you insure the fence is perpendicular to the table top and the tool below will make sure the fence and the blade are parallel to one another.

The only other tool I find really helpful is a Wixey Digital Angle gauge to check the fence and the blade for perpendicular, and any other angle you need to set for the blade.

As others have suggested, a good combination blade is a good investment. I use a Freud Premier Fusion blade. Great blade for the price with excellent performance.

A zero clearance insert plate with a micro jig splitter is a good safety item, if your saw does not have a riving knife.

- timbertailor

Thanks! I will look into getting this, I was actually wondering if the made a tool just for that.

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