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Best way to put this 45 together

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Forum topic by Jackietreehorn posted 02-15-2015 09:58 PM 1523 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1403 days


02-15-2015 09:58 PM

I guess this is a joinery question. I have small bar top my sister wanted me to make, then she brought in some oak bar trim for the edges. My question is what’s the best way to mount the pieces to the top and best way to make that 45 miter stay nice and tight? I’ve never had to do this before so figured I’d ask vs trial and error.

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com


16 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#1 posted 02-15-2015 10:07 PM

I would glue it and probably add a finishing nail or two. Then use putty to fill the nail hole in.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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altendky

169 posts in 1675 days


#2 posted 02-15-2015 10:23 PM

Not talking from experience, but you could perhaps strengthen the joint with a spline? Exposed or hidden depending on her preference.

Is it real granite or laminate? It should probably be obvious, but I’d rather ask than guess. If real, I figure you either just glue (construction adhesive or some such) or drill holes for pegs or threaded inserts. Otherwise, I suppose about the same thing.

Good luck g

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Crank50

173 posts in 1041 days


#3 posted 02-15-2015 11:56 PM

Glue and finishing nails as suggested.
Due to difficulty clamping that angle some folks would use CA glue for that.

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Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1403 days


#4 posted 02-16-2015 12:28 AM

Thanks for the input guys, so this generates another question, how does one finish these in place? I originally was thinking I’d finish them and then put them in place. The top is formica, so do I just use a nice masking tape?

With that spline idea, I guess I could use a biscuit, I would just have to modify one or make my own cut at the right angle…

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 687 days


#5 posted 02-16-2015 03:46 AM

If it a completed octo and all angles are correct I’d say glue then band clamp it. If not I’d make a jig that would align the pieces then shim the ends for a pressure fit.

-- I meant to do that!

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#6 posted 02-16-2015 01:56 PM

Since you haven’t attached them yet, why not finish them first ?

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 889 days


#7 posted 02-16-2015 02:04 PM

Attach one piece at a time with construction adhesive (liquid nails) after test fitting the next two pieces in sequence first.

I would of had the supplier of the counter top cut a waterfall or bullnose for me but I am lazy.

P.S. That first piece looks a smidge long.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View dogmir's profile

dogmir

25 posts in 1437 days


#8 posted 02-16-2015 02:24 PM

If I was doing that, I would use glue and pocket hole screw on the inside face of that joint to ensure it stays nice and tight.

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2400 days


#9 posted 02-16-2015 04:05 PM

If the final finish is going to be clear and not something like paint I wouldn’t nail it. Those nails will show regardless of any filler or putty. I would run biscuits along the length to fasten it to the top and then a spline/biscuit on the miter.

Edit: if you don’t have a plate jointer to cut biscuit slots get a slot cutting bit (w/bearing) for the router and and cut a slot all around the top and another on the molding and use a spline.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#10 posted 02-16-2015 04:50 PM

I will mention that I have a corner hutch antique reproduction. It has some trim molding attached like that illustrated.
Over the years it all has fallen off and had to be re-attached.
A tight joint around a table top like yours is a virtual impossibility.
It will expand and shrink with the humidity in the air and will either have gaps in the corner joint or will push away from the table edge in time.
In theory, a rigid connection of the joint and a flexible attachment to the table might be as good as you can hope for.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#11 posted 02-16-2015 08:27 PM



A tight joint around a table top like yours is a virtual impossibility.

- crank49

I had a different experience. This similar trim was attached to a counter top 8 years ago with construction adhesive and pins, to a plywood substrate. It has never come apart and seems to remain very strong.

View Jackietreehorn's profile

Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1403 days


#12 posted 02-16-2015 08:53 PM

Thanks for all the input guys. The substrate is mdf. The top Formica, it’s only a one sided bar top, so I only have this one 45 section to deal with. I figured pre finishing would be best, it’s just getting clear top coat, no stain. I have both biscuit jointer and slot cutting bit, I’m thinking I might try the slot cutting bit since running the biscuit jointer on the edge of that moulding seems like a wobble fest. Probably won’t tackle till next weekend, cross my fingers.

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2435 days


#13 posted 02-16-2015 09:35 PM

Plywood or MDF will help make the system more stable. My situation is solid wood against solid wood with grain running perpendicular in direction.

And, I did agree that the attachment to the table needed to be flexible. Good place for construction adhesive.

Being half a top will be even better.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View Jackietreehorn's profile

Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1403 days


#14 posted 02-22-2015 03:37 PM

Here’s about all I got accomplished, made test piece that I’m going to practice with. I made a spline out of mdf that fits nice and tight. Guess I’ll see how it ends up

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 687 days


#15 posted 02-22-2015 06:58 PM

I have used similar joints on headboards and foot boards etc., etc. No splines, nails, screws or biscuits just glue. The youngest is 8yrs old and in my bdrm, (.img above Oak headboard) all the rest are well over 8 and none of my custs have called and complained about open joints. I have one fin nail at the center with glue, the trim joint and the corner is glued. Note but unseen, I also dadoed the underside of the trim so it sits over the 1 1/2” thick Oak Hb. A bed is not a static object it moves every time something scrambles over the mattress.

In the limited experience I have in jointing I get my best results doing the below.

1. All mat should be as dry as you can get it before you begin the milling process.
2. The thinner/narrower the trim is the less it will expand and contract.
3. The dryer it is when the finish is applied the less moisture absorption will take place later on.
4. The shorter the section of cross grain area to be covered by the trim the less the worry is regarding expansion.
5. If you apply glue on a cross grain area, do it in the center section

-- I meant to do that!

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