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Space saving multifunction jig

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Forum topic by Dan Krager posted 02-12-2015 10:23 PM 1653 views 3 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1696 days


02-12-2015 10:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig router clamp joining

While it’s cold out, I’m keeping myself busy drawing up a relatively complex multifunction jig. I have made a couple simpler ones, and have interest in several more, but I realized two things: 1. space is an issue for almost everyone including me and 2. these desired jigs all have many elements in common. So why not combine them?

I’d like to start a conversation about the notion, and so I will post four pictures of what I have so far. The first picture is the assembly of all the parts. Don’t let it intimidate you, because as you will see it isn’t going to be hard to build.

Here are some mortise set ups…

This is a set up for cutting equal or variable finger joints. A router with a top bearing pattern bit follows the fingers on both sides and has the capacity to cut all the joints for a box in two steps.

This is the setup potential for a double moxon vise, useful for layout, transfer, and cutting of dovetails. Notice it elevates the height to a comfortable distance above the work bench.

This is a compilation of ideas from many different sources. This is on my bucket list to build later this year after the potential of the design has been exploited as far as it can be taken. I know it won’t be for everyone, so don’t go all ballistic if you don’t like it. I’m very partial to well designed multifunction stuff that has the added bonus of using modular parts. In my shop are many modular items that serve me well around the shop and this uses some of them.
Let’s hear from you. I will eventually share the SU drawing at my website for you to download freely.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.


13 replies so far

View Rob's profile

Rob

704 posts in 2533 days


#1 posted 02-12-2015 10:46 PM

I definitely see the potential but like you mentioned, it may not be for everyone. The nice thing about a simple jig is that you can look at it and easily know how it works. But I can see how something with more than a couple adjustments could quickly become confusing if you’re not the person who designed it. I’m really looking forward to a video once you build it!

-- Ask an expert or be the expert - http://woodworking.stackexchange.com

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Jerry

1767 posts in 1110 days


#2 posted 02-12-2015 10:49 PM

That makes my brain hurt.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

45 posts in 1399 days


#3 posted 02-13-2015 09:41 AM

Dan you are one of the most creative guys I know!
I’ll look forward to the SU drawing to peruse. I’m not sure I’ll have the mental nor skill to
capably implement it….

-- Jhopewell, New Hampshire, www.hopewellwoodwork.com

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#4 posted 02-13-2015 10:41 AM

I think it would be easier to add on to the shop. :)

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jacquesr

339 posts in 885 days


#5 posted 02-13-2015 12:05 PM

Very interesting – I will closely follow this thread.
Keep us posted!

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

6903 posts in 1592 days


#6 posted 02-13-2015 05:14 PM


I think it would be easier to add on to the shop. :)

- AlaskaGuy

Less brain power for sure!

Dan, this looks cool. I was just thinking the other night that I need to start making some jigs, and then that naturally flowed into, “where am I going to put all of these?”

I will be following along closely.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1570 days


#7 posted 02-13-2015 05:19 PM

I suspect this probably would be easier to understand from watching it in action than from looking at specs/design plans. So I’m gonna go ahead and wait for you to build it and then put up a Youtube video :-).

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1696 days


#8 posted 02-13-2015 09:56 PM

LAWLs! The interaction is fun…thank you for it. This is one of those things that you don’t have to build all at once. You can start with the basic piece and add as you need it. It looks like, with that in mind, a builder might want to start with identifying what function is needed first. I’ll keep that in mind as I design and lay out instructions. I’ve made it BIG because my shop layout specs call for up to a 30” capacity on jigs like this. (Shop specs also call for a layout that can handle 10’ boards without moving anything (very much), etc, etc.) It can be made to any capacity one wants, within reason.
I imagine this to be primarily a hobbyist tool that they build themselves, not a commercial production. However, I’ve watched other ideas develop commercially where for $X you get the basic unit and for $10X dollars you get the “accessories”...

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View dougmk's profile

dougmk

17 posts in 1063 days


#9 posted 02-14-2015 02:11 PM

After studying the drawings, sleeping and looking at them again, I concluded I am still confused. But sometimes opening a box cereal can be a challenge for me. It is obvious you have put a lot of thought into the jig and I like the modular concept. I will be watching for future posts on this.

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1696 days


#10 posted 02-16-2015 03:52 PM

Perhaps these photos of a spring board prototype will help? This was built a while ago primarily to make repeatable mortises fast and easy for loose tenons. What may not be obvious is that the router edge guide is captive in the T-slot along the back, captive but slides freely side to side. Note also that I could not find a hinge that would keep the top edge of the tilting table even with the support table for the router, hence the quadrant style pivot whose center point is the edge of the tilting table.




DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

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Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1696 days


#11 posted 02-16-2015 09:09 PM

Man! I just read the Porter Cable instruction manual (sort of— had to say that to keep reputation ya’ know) and now MY head hurts. The jig shown above will have nearly as many capabilities, and more in some areas, but I think it be a LOT simpler than the PC Omnijig! YMMV.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

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Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1696 days


#12 posted 02-25-2015 10:27 PM

Here’s why I want the jig to be as big as it will be… It could almost justify its own tool stand.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View Jaywind's profile

Jaywind

4 posts in 612 days


#13 posted 04-03-2015 02:17 AM

Wow, very impressive!

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