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Drill press keyless chuck?

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Forum topic by JeffP posted 02-12-2015 12:18 PM 1241 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


02-12-2015 12:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drill press question

Hi, I need some education on chucks for drill press. (is the plural of press just press, or presses?)

Anyway, I really like the keyless chucks that are common on cordless drills these days. Hate having to either go searching for the darn key, or have it dangling around on a cord that is always in the way.

In doing a little bit of buying research though, it seems this is not common on a drill press.

Why is that? Do they not work well in this application?

I noticed there is a significant after-market for drill press chucks, and there are some keyless varieties available. Have any of you upgraded to a keyless aftermarket chuck? Do you like it?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.


17 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1958 days


#1 posted 02-12-2015 12:48 PM

I purposely avoided adding the keyless to my DP when I upgraded the chuck. I have enough trouble getting the ones on my cordless drills tight enough, and I actually converted one of my corded drills from keyless to a keyed chuck. The DP has a lot more torque (and takes a lot more torque for the larger bits) than a hand held…no way was I going to fight with that. The DP keyless has it’s fans; when I asked about them I got several reco’s to go keyless, in my case that’s NFW.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View stnich's profile

stnich

116 posts in 2389 days


#2 posted 02-12-2015 12:52 PM

I have an old Jet drill press with a keyless chuck. I drill large holes largest being 3 1/4”. I hate the keyless
chuck for these bits. It is problematic getting the bit loose from the chuck. I got a new Drill Press a couple
of years ago now the Jet just sits there waiting for me to turn it into a dedicated mortiser.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#3 posted 02-12-2015 12:57 PM

Have a look at the ones from Röhm. Heavy duty and have a good grip and doesent lock on the bit like Stnitch mentions. Not the cheapest though..

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#4 posted 02-12-2015 01:29 PM

I could also use some education about the interface between the drill press shaft and the chuck.

What sort of a connection is it? Is it standard across the industry, or do I need to be careful when selecting an aftermarket chuck to get one that will “fit” on a given drill press?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1958 days


#5 posted 02-12-2015 01:43 PM

The chuck is held on by an arbor in most cases. The part of the arbor that fits into the chuck body has a taper most commonly called a “Jacobs Taper”, as in JT 2 or something like that. The end that fits in the DP is most commonly a Morse taper, or MT 2 . (linky) The chuck either has to fit the arbor you have, or you buy a new arbor. They can be pretty cheap, when I replaced mine I upsized the chuck to 3/4”, which also meant a new arbor…I think I paid about $10 for mine. I have seen some some chucks that thread onto the arbor, and then it still has an MT2 (most common) fitting to the DP. You need to figure out what you have first. Doesn’t sound to me like you’re leaning toward a keyed chuck, but if you are the Jacobs brand are fairly steep in price, The Asian imports just don’t seem to be very well made. An alternative is the LFA brand (made in France). Quite a bit cheaper than Jacobs, and just as well made (IMHO), you can get them from Amazon for less than $100.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#6 posted 02-12-2015 02:05 PM

Thanks Fred.

So I gather it is just a “friction fit” between the Jacobs taper on the chuck and the Morse taper on the arbor? And there are just a few different sizes (1, 2, 3, etc.)?

So the “arbor” has a screw-on connection to the DP? Is that standardized, or are there a few different styles of connection between the arbor and the DP?

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#7 posted 02-12-2015 02:21 PM

I am also looking to change the chuck on my drill press.

As mentioned above, my drill press has an arbor which is a #2 Morse taper…2MT…that fits into the drill press. The other end can be threaded or a taper. This connects to the actual chuck.

You need to determine what arbor you need and then a chuck which fits the arbor.

If you Google drill press arbor you can find some pictures and the different specs.

There is an amazing number of various combinations.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#8 posted 02-12-2015 02:25 PM

I salvaged the keyless chuch from an old Makita cordless and just chuck it up in the existing chuck on my drillpress. Only opens to 3/8” but I can use the chuck in the press for larger bits. I have no problems getting the keyless chuck tight.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#9 posted 02-12-2015 02:33 PM

Jeff, depending on what drill press you have, it could be an arbor that is threaded where the chuck is screwed onto the arbor but that isn’t common. As mentioned before the taper into the chuck is typically a Jacobs taper and it is a friction fit. The taper in the quill that accepts the arbor is a morse taper and these are different. Not all drill presses will have an arbor like this that can be changed, it is typically reserved for larger (non bench top) presses. You can remove the chuck/arbor assembly and use a dedicated bit that has a morse taper on the drive end instead of a cylindrical shank. This arrangement is usually for metalwork where torque levels are very high and bit slippage cannot be tolerated.

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#10 posted 02-12-2015 02:33 PM

Ok, after taking the suggestion above to google drill press chuck, I found a good youtube video by grizzly that made it all pretty clear.

drill press video

Seems that the “arbor” is a two ended taper thing, with Morse taper on the “top” end (hooking into the drill press spindle), and a Jacobs taper on the “bottom” end (hooking into the chuck).

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 02-12-2015 02:49 PM

You’ve got it now, I don’t always word things well enough. That’s also how drill chucks are held on a wood lathe, meaning if you have (or will have) a lathe you can pull the chuck from your drill and use it on the lathe (assuming the lathe is the same MT as the DP).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2449 days


#12 posted 02-12-2015 02:56 PM

One thing about the keyless chucks is that there are a whole class of them that are perfectly usable for drill presses. The ones on cordless drills are purposely cheap because they can’t be selling a cordless drill for $900 (unless you’re Festool :)). Machinists use keyless chucks frequently, but they buy really nice ones that cost about $300 just for the chuck. Those hold very well, don’t take a gorilla grip to open/tighten, have very good tolerances, etc. The cheaper ones will not be as nice. I would love to upgrade mine, but I just never seem to get around to it.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#13 posted 02-12-2015 06:19 PM

The original key-less chuck for a DP is made by Albrecht. The latest price is $360. It self tightens and won’t slip. I have a cheap import on my DP and it works fine. It doesn’t slip. I have a much better chuck on my vertical mill and was worth around $100 when I fount it in a pawn shop for $20. Every drilling tool I have has a key-less chuck and I have never had a problem with any of them

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2405 posts in 2390 days


#14 posted 02-12-2015 06:26 PM

My General International drill press came with a key-less, first time I used one on a drill press and I like it.

I have a Delta that is the same size w keyed chuck, and I suppose I could use it for very large bits to avoid the tightening issue, but really haven’t had any issues with the large ones (3” saw tooth) that I have used.

All the best!

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#15 posted 02-12-2015 06:38 PM

Thanks all.

Nobody has answered my pluralization question yet…

If one has more than one drill press, do they have:

a gaggle of drill press

a pride of drill presses

a cornucopia of drill pressi

????

(“several drill presses” seems a lot like a “school of fishes” to me)

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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