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Going out on my own. Need some advice...

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Forum topic by spooligan34 posted 02-12-2015 02:41 AM 755 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spooligan34

7 posts in 662 days


02-12-2015 02:41 AM

I currently work for a large closet franchise and am planning on going out on my own. I was wondering if anyone had advice on how to setup a shop for starters, show some of your work vans, and if anyone has started in the closet business, how you started.

I have lined up my supplier for the parts and hardware, just not sure what else I will need. I am thinking of working out of my house with an office and a small shop out of my garage to cut the poles and hanging rails and house hardware, closet accessories, etc. As for a van, I’m thinking of a sprinter or cargo van with shelving on the sides to house tools and such. The material will be transported in the van inside a “job cart” with 2 separate carpeted sections for shelves and vertical panels.

My debate is whether anyone has found the need to have a storage unit to house the material for upcoming jobs.


7 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3175 days


#1 posted 02-12-2015 02:50 AM

I think there may be a bit more to starting a business than lining up suppliers. There have been several well thought posts here on LJs about starting out on your own. It may be worth reading through those; using “starting your own business” in the search tool in the top right corner may be a good start.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View abie's profile

abie

818 posts in 3233 days


#2 posted 02-12-2015 02:56 AM

My Best friend has,had a closet Business he started here in N. California,
worked it for 20 years
lots of advice perhaps
let me know and I will put you in touch.
Bruce

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

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spooligan34

7 posts in 662 days


#3 posted 02-12-2015 11:09 PM



I think there may be a bit more to starting a business than lining up suppliers. There have been several well thought posts here on LJs about starting out on your own. It may be worth reading through those; using “starting your own business” in the search tool in the top right corner may be a good start.

- Mark Shymanski

Hey Mark,

I appreciate your looking out for me. I understand that there is more to starting my own business than just lining up suppliers. Especially in my state on NJ, there are regulations and such that need to be followed and I am also lining up my LLC and GL insurance, and then my NJ HIC registration. I am also lining up my financing. My post was more of a specific information request. The company I currently work for manufactures their own panels and shelves, etc. I wouldn’t have those capabilities and therefore am looking for advice from those that have possibly done this same venture and their process.

Thanks though and I will look at some of those posts anyway. You can never have too much information.

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spooligan34

7 posts in 662 days


#4 posted 02-12-2015 11:12 PM



My Best friend has,had a closet Business he started here in N. California,
worked it for 20 years
lots of advice perhaps
let me know and I will put you in touch.
Bruce

- abie

Bruce,

I would love to speak to your friend. i am sure he would have lots of great advice.

spooligan34@gmail.com


My Best friend has,had a closet Business he started here in N. California,
worked it for 20 years
lots of advice perhaps
let me know and I will put you in touch.
Bruce

- abie


View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3204 days


#5 posted 02-12-2015 11:14 PM

You might reach out directly. Search for closets and then PM the makers if they are pro’s

In New Jersey – do you need to pull permits or have any sort of “journeyman’ status like plumbers builders and electricians… or is the ‘closet’ work officialy small enough that the city/county doesn’t require inspections/licenses etc.

here there is no requirement, but I always heard Jersey was big on unions, so your laws may be strict.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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spooligan34

7 posts in 662 days


#6 posted 02-12-2015 11:35 PM



You might reach out directly. Search for closets and then PM the makers if they are pro s

In New Jersey – do you need to pull permits or have any sort of “journeyman status like plumbers builders and electricians… or is the closet work officialy small enough that the city/county doesn t require inspections/licenses etc.

here there is no requirement, but I always heard Jersey was big on unions, so your laws may be strict.

- DrDirt

In NJ everyone making any alterations to homes is considered a Home Improvement Contractor and requires a HIC registration. To get that you have to have GL insurance, LLC, INc, Corp documentation and $110 feee ach year. Plumbers and electricians are the only ones that truely require licenses. As for my town, no business license is needed, so that 1 less expense.

No permits needed as the closet systems do not affect the structure of homes. The closet systems hang on a steel rail that is screwed into the studs through the drywall.

In NJ even lanscapers that plant shrubs or trees need an HIC registration.

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,

2387 posts in 3009 days


#7 posted 02-13-2015 01:13 AM

I started a custom cabinet shop back in 2010. Things I wish I would have thought more on at the beginning would be: Hire a good accountant, look for small business services that will help guide you through taxes and any other local and national rules you might have. Consider how you will get the word out about your new company and how you plan to generate leads / sales. So marketing has been a huge asset for us, especially when done correctly. I have always made every attempt to minimize overhead. I began by renting a highly visible shop that was smallish and about the cheapest rent I could find. I then lived a lot off of walk ins and then from profits I ended up building our own shop so that we could cut rent overhead. Another huge advantage I have found is going with a cash as I go rule. If my customer cannot afford 50% down, then neither he/she or I can afford to work together. If they give 50% down, and your prices are correct, then the job should be built with the 50% cash down. Therefore no debt is really required. The 50% balance will cover your overhead and begin to build your operating cash flow, or reinvest back into your company as I have.

-- .

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