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GLUING CROSS GRAINED WOOD

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Forum topic by Mark Geserick posted 08-08-2007 03:18 PM 884 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark Geserick

35 posts in 2699 days


08-08-2007 03:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glue grain orientation cross grained

I WAS WATCHING A NEW YANKEE SEGMENT. NORM WAS CAREFUL NOT TO GLUE THE ENTIRE SURFACE OF A TRIM PIECE HE WAS ATTACHING TO A CARCASS. HE ONLY PUT A LITTLE GLUE IN THE CENTER OF THE MOULDING AND THEN TACKED IT WITH BRADS. THE REASON WAS THE GRAIN OF THE PIECE HE WAS GLUING WAS CROSS GRAINED. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? AND IS IT IMPORTANT?

-- Mark, South Jersey


3 replies so far

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GaryK

10262 posts in 2737 days


#1 posted 08-08-2007 03:36 PM

It is very important.

What he was saying is that when wood expands it grows wider and not longer (not very much anyway).

So when you attach two pieces together and the grains are going across each other you have to allow for expansion.

Gluing them together along the entire length will cause the joint to fail or the wood to split.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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Dadoo

1776 posts in 2739 days


#2 posted 08-08-2007 04:46 PM

Agreed. It’s definately to allow for expansion in the wood.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

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Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2836 days


#3 posted 08-09-2007 12:58 PM

First, please do not type in all caps. It is considered yelling. We are not hard of seeing.

Wood will expand and contract depending upon the humidity. It changes from season to season. Daily is not usually a problem. The board will expand on the width, sometimes quite a lot (for a piece of wood) and some woods expand and contract more than others. If you live in Arizona it is not a big problem. If you live in an area that has three or four season it probably is.

If you look at the underside of a table top (made of real wood, not some of this manufactured wood commonly used nowadays) you will see that the fasteners are usually in elongated holes That is to accomodate wood expansion.

You might be able to find “Understanding Wood” by Bruce Hoagley (sp) in your library. It is also a good reference book to have yourself. He is (was) a professor at UMass.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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