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Delta Jointer DJ-15 question

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Forum topic by SirIrb posted 02-11-2015 01:47 PM 1055 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


02-11-2015 01:47 PM

So i got this jointer in good condition for $280 this past weekend. I went to work tweaking it in. And when i got to pulling the knives the owners manual said “loosen these bolts to remove the knives”, Check, “and tighten/loosen these 2 screws to raise/lower the knives”. But as i looked down at “these screws” there is only empty pockets. So I would guess there were 2 screws (per knife) that were held in place forward of each knife by the pressure of the bolts that hold the knives in. I would have pics but i have never gotten photobucket to work for me.

The previous owner had been using it without these screws. I used it a bit without them. So my big question is does anyone have this jointer? If so what am I missing here? Are these just to assist in knife height but are not necessary to the performance of the machine?

What say ye, Jocks?

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.


20 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 02-11-2015 01:52 PM

Those are called jack screws, and they are handy when you are setting the knives. But once the knives are clamped tightly, it wouldn’t matter of they were missing.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#2 posted 02-11-2015 02:00 PM

Thanks. Based on the design of the cutterhead i didnt think they were mandatory. I just wanted to check with someone who had done it before. Now, why did that jackhole trash them? I am going to have to set the knives high and tap them to spot with a wooden mallet. check, recheck, recheck etc.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#3 posted 02-11-2015 02:21 PM

The only reason I could think of to remove the jack screws would be if someone tried to install the wrong sized knives.. ones that were wider than required, making them stand too proud of the cutterhead when the screws were adjusted as low as they could go. Their only purpose is to aid in setting the knife height, and as Fred said, they are not absolutely required for operation. You can continue using it as is, and adjust the knives like you mention (and how it’s done on many other jointers that don’t have jack screws), but it would make your life much easier if you could source some replacements. I don’t believe there is anything ‘special’ about them or unique for the machine, and according to the parts list, they are just M5×15mm socket head set screws and some matching nuts; so you could probably find them at your local hardware store or online easily.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#4 posted 02-11-2015 02:40 PM


Now, why did that jackhole trash them?

- SirIrb

Who knows why parts goes missing….I keep wondering the same thing about all the cabinet saws that are missing the motor covers. Like Mr. Unix said, it’s a standard hardware item.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#5 posted 02-11-2015 03:07 PM

The nuts seem to be special for the cutterhead. And they want $4 a piece. I say that till i work on tweaking the knives and cant get it just right then the $24 bucks will look kinda good.

thanks for all the help.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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PatrickH

51 posts in 1354 days


#6 posted 02-11-2015 03:09 PM

$280 is a steal. There’s one for sale here that I’ve considered buying at $600.

-- http://bloodsweatsawdust.com

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#7 posted 02-11-2015 03:10 PM

I didnt want to rub it in. He was asking $300 and said he could just as well keep it. I talked him down. But he has a delta saw for $500 with a 52” fence if anyone lives near Winston Salem NC.

https://winstonsalem.craigslist.org/for/4875099864.html

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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PatrickH

51 posts in 1354 days


#8 posted 02-11-2015 03:29 PM

Wish I were closer…

-- http://bloodsweatsawdust.com

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#9 posted 02-11-2015 03:46 PM



Wish I were closer…

- PatrickH

Nice web site. I have spent quite a bit of time in Buford Ga.

Come on, 5 hours isnt bad for a good saw. If you like I ll do some leg work for you. Mainly because that guy is supposed to get me another set of knives and the safety guard and if I tell him i am looking at the saw for someone he will make sure to get me my crap. The safety guard: I am not safety guru. I worked a 16” jointer when i did it professionally before the engineering bug hit me (another very long and twisty story) and felt fine on it. But I have a 5 year old now and would rather that cutterhead be covered.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#10 posted 02-11-2015 04:03 PM

That saw seems a bit overpriced at $500.. particularly if it’s a 5 hour drive one way to get it! Maybe if it were a Unisaw, but not for that hybrid IMHO.

Too bad about those ‘special’ nuts the jointer uses.. however, it might be worth a try to make some from regular nuts; at least it would not cost much to try and if it works out, win-win. Since they are not really all that critical to the machines operation, you probably wouldn’t need to make exact duplicates of the originals, just something with the same basic functionality.. a grinder and some creativity might be all you need:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#11 posted 02-11-2015 04:15 PM



That saw seems a bit overpriced at $500.. particularly if it s a 5 hour drive one way to get it! Maybe if it were a Unisaw, but not for that hybrid IMHO.

Too bad about those special nuts the jointer uses.. however, it might be worth a try to make some from regular nuts; at least it would not cost much to try and if it works out, win-win. Since they are not really all that critical to the machines operation, you probably wouldn t need to make exact duplicates of the originals, just something with the same basic functionality.. a grinder and some creativity might be all you need:

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

This is the place i deny having previously said i am an engineer (and dad was a machinist). I could give it a shot. nothing to loose. Grab some stock and drill / tap some 10-32 maybe. Getting that non-concentric offset will be the fun part.

Thanks for the close-up of the nut.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 02-11-2015 04:28 PM

Doubt it has to be round.. just offset so the knife can set on it while still allowing you to get to the set screw.. I imagine it wouldn’t be too hard to make.. well, at least I wouldn’t think it would be. Might be worth a shot.. or you could just bite the bullet and plunk down the $24.. you could look at it as having paid the original $300 asking price and then another $4 more for the missing nuts :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#13 posted 02-11-2015 04:30 PM

People sometimes remove the jack screws to use magnetic jointer setting jigs, like the jointer pal. Pick up a knife setting jig and you should be up and running.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#14 posted 02-11-2015 04:34 PM



People sometimes remove the jack screws to use magnetic jointer setting jigs, like the jointer pal. Pick up a knife setting jig and you should be up and running.

- pintodeluxe

How well does the magnetic jigs work when the tightening screws hit the knives and start to add tension? Part of me thinks they would tweak below/ above the jig. I would love to be wrong and the jig works great. I would pay $24 for the jig then.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#15 posted 02-11-2015 05:58 PM

You use one or the other. If you use the magnetic jig, it holds the knives in position for you to snug the gib screws. Then remove the jig and tighten the ‘em up.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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