LumberJocks

Drill press runout question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by jacquesr posted 02-11-2015 02:44 AM 701 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 883 days


02-11-2015 02:44 AM

Hi guys,
I have had a PC drill press for 4 months, sitting pretty outside of my shop.
Key components were broken, and the arbor could not be installed…
Received new parts, replaced them…. had huge runout… bought a Grizzly keyless chuck…
I think I still have about .0010-.0015 – but when I use a 1 1/4 inch forstner bit (Colt)... I get a 1 1/4 inch home as per my caliper…. Is this a good test to mesure runout?
Am I being anal retentive (don’t answer please).
I intend to do precision work, hence my focus on accuracy.

Sleepless in Montréal

Thanks


13 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#1 posted 02-11-2015 03:08 AM

If you want to minimize run out you need to clamp the project to the table,. I have a Delta 16” and it’s a decent DP does pretty much everything I ask of it. I use metal and wood bits the wood bits, forstner and brad point, I have some brad point bits from the same group that are so off center or bent they’re not good for anything but sinkers or paper weights.

You need to do some experimenting to tie down the culprit, is it still bad with forstners and HSS when the object is clamped? Is the DP base moving around, or is the entire unit rattling/vibrating while the motors running and your not drilling? Is the table secure and square to the bit? Marrow the possibilities down.

-- I meant to do that!

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 883 days


#2 posted 02-11-2015 03:14 AM

The piece was solidly clamped.
Is a Forstner bit a good test?
Thanks for your input.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 02-11-2015 03:42 AM

Can you rattle the chuck/arbor/spindle in the quill?
Pop open the top and watch the belts and pulleys while the motor is running any undue slop between them?
I would then bottom out the spindle and lock it down then set up a dial indicator on the table then remove one of the belts and rotate the spindle by hand from the pulley compartment. Watch the indicator for the run out. It’s possible the quill could be warped.

-- I meant to do that!

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2084 days


#4 posted 02-11-2015 03:52 AM

Really, you are worried about 1 thou?

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 883 days


#5 posted 02-11-2015 04:05 AM

10-15 thou

View Garbanzolasvegas's profile

Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 687 days


#6 posted 02-11-2015 04:07 AM

I have gotten a PC from lows with huge runout. Cant decide it its the chuck or the shaft

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13442 posts in 1316 days


#7 posted 02-11-2015 04:09 AM

.001 is a thousandth.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#8 posted 02-11-2015 04:15 AM

I have an older Delta runout on it is about .005. It drills an accurate hole. Your working with a material that will move way more than your runout. Your being anal.
Just the manufacturing tolerances in the chuck jaws could give you .001 runout. If you need that kind of accuracy you need to get a mill made for metal work. You can adjust them for zero on setup for each job.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 883 days


#9 posted 02-11-2015 04:22 AM

Thanks! .010-.015 then.


.001 is a thousandth.

- firefighterontheside


View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#10 posted 02-11-2015 01:04 PM

Pictures of where and how you are measuring the runout would help.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2084 days


#11 posted 02-11-2015 02:02 PM

OK .01 IS serious.
First check to see if it is the arbor or the chuck.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#12 posted 02-11-2015 05:41 PM

A drill press is not considered a “precision” machine. In the metal working world, if you want accurate holes, you use a lathe or vertical mill. But yes, .0010 to .0015 is too much; even for wood. If you want a precise chuck, you need an Albrecht chuck, but be prepared to pay around $200 for it. The ball bearings on a garden variety DP are general purpose bearings which means .001 to .002 precision. You have clearance between the bearings and the arbor; clearance between the arbor and the quill and the chuck has a runout amount. It all adds up to excessive runout. I have a DP and a vertical mill. If I want an accurate hole, I go to the mill.

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 883 days


#13 posted 02-12-2015 12:46 AM

Alright guys – looks like the arbor was not fully seated.
I have drilled many types of wholes today and the results are excellent.
My calliper shows me exactly 15/32 when I used that bit, and so on.
Quite happy – A drill press is (to me) a simple machine and I was ready to switch for a big Jet.
But my el cheapo PC will do just fine.
Thanks a lot for those who chimed in.
Much appreciated.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com