LumberJocks

Wet wood reusable?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 02-10-2015 10:12 PM 839 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

220 posts in 800 days


02-10-2015 10:12 PM

I had some 2×6 that I build a raised garden bed with. They are untreated and sat in the weather for about 6 months. We are moving so I had to pull them out and the boards looked pretty decent a couple of them were very full of moisture but some seemed still solid.

Is there anyway to let them dry out and be able to cut out or plane out the bad parts and make the boards useable again?

-- Colorado Springs, CO


7 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#1 posted 02-10-2015 11:12 PM

Construction lumber is going to twist like crazy as it dries, I’d say you’d be good for another raised bed application if yu rebuild it pretty quick. Wood will take near a year per inch to dry in air stack not sure the lumber yuve got wiud be worth the work

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

220 posts in 800 days


#2 posted 02-10-2015 11:25 PM

A year per inch! My word.

-- Colorado Springs, CO

View Logboy's profile

Logboy

43 posts in 2697 days


#3 posted 02-11-2015 04:44 AM

The “year per inch” rule is a very poor rule that still exists to this day due to old timers and people who have no experience with drying lumber. Under warm dry windy conditions you can air dry fresh sawn 4/4 pine in 2-3 months down to 12% moisture. Thats actually lower than it is typically kiln dried to. Softer hardwoods can be dried in months while a hardwood like White Oak might take a couple of years. Like I said, the year per inch rule is a poor rule.

Long story short, put your boards in a warm dry environment. Lean them up against the wall in your basement or woodshop, but dont put a fan on them. Its all but impossible to dry softwood too quickly. You’ll probably get a little warping. When it stops getting lighter in weight then you know its dry, or just wait a month or so. This time of year our homes are very dry, like 30% humidity, and that will give you a moisture content of around 6% if you leave it there long enough, which is more than dry enough to work with. The stuff you buy from the lumber yard is probably at least 15% or more.

-- No log is too big to saw! www.logboy.com

View CharlesHeilman's profile

CharlesHeilman

5 posts in 668 days


#4 posted 02-11-2015 09:55 AM

Unfortunately there’s no simple and fast solutions to dry wet softwood. According to me, i think you should wait to dry the whole wood then reuse it.

-- Luxury Window Fashions Store : http://luxurywindowfashions.com/

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

220 posts in 800 days


#5 posted 02-11-2015 01:49 PM

Thank you all for your input would the wood being SYP increase or decrease its drying time?

-- Colorado Springs, CO

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#6 posted 02-11-2015 06:52 PM

PT takes a long time to dry out and you don’t want that surrounding your veggie bed. Bad for cell structure. Framing lumber on the ground and filled with soil can be expected to last about 5 to 8 yrs before insects and weather beat it down to where your screws and or lags will begin sliding out brackets will hold the corners together longer than lags alone. I also suggest you place and screw a 2X4 low to hold the sides together it’ll help when tilling and shoveling for spuds.

-- I meant to do that!

View Logboy's profile

Logboy

43 posts in 2697 days


#7 posted 02-11-2015 09:01 PM

SYP dries very quickly in a dry kiln so it will dry very quickly for you as well.

-- No log is too big to saw! www.logboy.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com