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Forum topic by albachippie posted 02-10-2015 03:51 PM 1631 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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albachippie

757 posts in 2497 days


02-10-2015 03:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer thicnesser

I have recently started a new job in a machine shop in a local college. I am responsible for the machines and their safe use by students. I would like to make a point to the students about eye safety, particularly while using the planer thicknesser. I want to know, roughly, how fast would a wood chip be travelling whilst being ejected be the planer drum, which is rotating at 5000rpm? I see the students, and lecturers for that matter, standing over the machine, screwing their face up because there are chips flying straight at their face. Why not wear safety glasses,which I have made readily available at all machines, I just don’t know. I have seen a thread regarding the use of safety gear on TV on LJs, and I agree. These are guys and girls starting out in their chosen trade, who are going to need their eyes for the rest of their lives.

Anyway, any ideas????

Cheers,

Garry

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl


37 replies so far

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2705 days


#1 posted 02-10-2015 04:00 PM

No safety glasses, no entry.

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descolada

52 posts in 1260 days


#2 posted 02-10-2015 05:18 PM

Assuming a 4” diameter cutterhead, the chips should be flying out at about 60mph. Twice the diameter equals twice the speed.

Or what MrRon said.

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Redoak49

1945 posts in 1450 days


#3 posted 02-10-2015 05:20 PM

I agree with no safety glasses no entry.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 02-10-2015 05:32 PM

How do you stand over a planer when feeding wood and why would the chips be coming straight up? Pretty much every planer I’ve ever used shoots them out the opposite side of feed, away from the operator. But yeah, glasses should be required in order to use any machine in that type of environment, regardless of where the chips may fly. That has been the rule in every shop class I’ve ever been in or seen.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 02-10-2015 05:40 PM



I agree with no safety glasses no entry.

- Redoak49

Pretty much

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Julian

1034 posts in 2152 days


#6 posted 02-10-2015 05:52 PM

This should be a rule established by the department manager (or who ever is responsible) and enforced by the instructors. I would also suspect you could find an OSHA regulation on the use of personal protective equipment (i.e. safety glasses, etc…). All OSHA regs. are on the internet.

-- Julian

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agallant

530 posts in 2348 days


#7 posted 02-10-2015 05:54 PM

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JoeinGa

7480 posts in 1469 days


#8 posted 02-10-2015 06:20 PM

I would bet that an OSHA inspector would FREAK OUT if he came into a woodworking shop and no one was wearing safety glasses. Same for most manufacturing plants. Every one I’ve worked at had signs on all the doors saying “Safety Glasses Required Beyond This Point”

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Yonak

979 posts in 983 days


#9 posted 02-10-2015 06:38 PM

Where’s the dust extraction ? That’s a negligent situation to have it shooting to the air.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#10 posted 02-10-2015 06:54 PM

Even with a vac running, chips can and do get stuck up in the carriage then drop down onto the board being planed then ejected out the infeed side. The spinning cutter head with knives standing out an 1/8” acts just like a rotating fan. It happens when multiple boards are making multiple passes to dim.

All planers are set to eject without DC, you can buy the attachment to connect a DC hose or not. Not recommended but doable. My JPM came with the dust shoot, I had to buy the shoot separate for my Delta 12”

-- I meant to do that!

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HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 676 days


#11 posted 02-10-2015 07:40 PM

I would create a certification program. A person must be trained and certified by an instructor to operate that machine, must pass a written test, must agree to use the PPG provided, and can have their certification revoked if they are observed misusing the machine or failing to wear PPG.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

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Shadowrider

183 posts in 671 days


#12 posted 02-10-2015 07:43 PM

Knowing the RPM and the diameter of the cutterhead you can figure the surface speed in feet per minute. That’s how fast the cutter teeth are moving so the chip is going that fast as it leaves the cutter.

(RPM x DIA)x 3.1416/12

Edit: Dang software won’t let me type asterisks

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#13 posted 02-10-2015 07:54 PM

I come out w/ 86 fps (feet per second), assuming a 4” cutterhead, which is probably more meaningful than mph. So if a persons eye was 18” from the cutterhead it would take .017 seconds for a particle of wood to reach the target eye, far faster than anyone can react or even perceive the hazard. Wear safety glasses.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#14 posted 02-10-2015 08:03 PM

So if a persons eye was 18” from the cutterhead it would take .017 seconds for a particle of wood to reach the target eye, far faster than anyone can react or even perceive the hazard. Wear safety glasses.

It may leave the cutter at that speed, but will very quickly slow due to air resistance, shape and light weight of the chips themselves.. and I doubt anyone is going to have their head just a foot and a half away from it! Still not an excuse.. safety glasses need to be worn and should be required to use any machine that shoots out chips or has any potential to do so, regardless of how fast or slow they may be coming at you.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View albachippie's profile

albachippie

757 posts in 2497 days


#15 posted 02-10-2015 08:21 PM

Thanks all for your input. The extraction is very efficient, but, as Ghidrah says, the best extraction in the world wont stop stray chips. I have been round machinery long enough to know you can’t be too careful. This is the machine in question.

It has a 520mm wide cutter head, with 4 knives, which, as I say, rotates at up to 5000rpm. I have signs, I have glasses everywhere, and I have talked to the lecturers, urging them to insist on safety wear. The college have policies in place, as laid out by the HSE (Health and Safety Executive) but enforcing this is proving to be challenge.

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

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